Humans can regenerate cartilage

longknife

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d...-finds-offering-hope-for-arthritis-treatment/
 

Frannie

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d...-finds-offering-hope-for-arthritis-treatment/
I seem to remember Christopher Reeve explaining that stem cells were going to regenerate spinal tissue
 

Bo Didleysquat

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @
Someone will have to see a suitable return potential to be maximized first.
 

Frannie

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
Really regrowing limbs?

You would need salamander DNA to do this
 

alang1216

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
Really regrowing limbs?

You would need salamander DNA to do this
Who says we don't already have that salamander DNA in us? If you believe in evolution you have hope.
 

Frannie

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
Really regrowing limbs?

You would need salamander DNA to do this
Who says we don't already have that salamander DNA in us? If you believe in evolution you have hope.
False hope is not hope, it's a way to cope. Start exercising and take Natrol dhea, it's better that test replacement. Only you can make it happen
 

RodISHI

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
A little research and the right ingredients along with light therapy may be helpful. I made Rod a mixture of herbs, minerals, vitamins and used the cartilage from beef or chicken bones in broth which helped his knee immensely along with a light.

https://www.betterbraces.com/media/...rtilage Repair and Osteoarthritis Healing.pdf

Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy in an Experimental Model of Osteoarthritis in Rats Evaluated Through Raman Spectroscopy
 

Frannie

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
A little research and the right ingredients along with light therapy may be helpful. I made Rod a mixture of herbs, minerals, vitamins and used the cartilage from beef or chicken bones in broth which helped his knee immensely along with a light.

https://www.betterbraces.com/media/Effects of Light Therapy on Cartilage Repair and Osteoarthritis Healing.pdf

Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy in an Experimental Model of Osteoarthritis in Rats Evaluated Through Raman Spectroscopy
Chicken cartilage does nothing because the body merely digest it as another form of protein. Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM will help with joint issues a little.
 

RodISHI

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
A little research and the right ingredients along with light therapy may be helpful. I made Rod a mixture of herbs, minerals, vitamins and used the cartilage from beef or chicken bones in broth which helped his knee immensely along with a light.

https://www.betterbraces.com/media/Effects of Light Therapy on Cartilage Repair and Osteoarthritis Healing.pdf

Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy in an Experimental Model of Osteoarthritis in Rats Evaluated Through Raman Spectroscopy
Chicken cartilage does nothing because the body merely digest it as another form of protein. Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM will help with joint issues a little.
"Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM". I put both of those along with other goodies in his daily mix. A bone in his hand that was broken when he was in his twenties he never had taken care of was also breaking frequently and the super mix seemed to help that too.

Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats. - PubMed - NCBI
 

Frannie

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Lord above, I hope so. The cartilage in my left knee is almost completely gone and the same in my right isn’t far behind. It’s got me stuck to walkers, a wheelchair, and an electric scooter.

If you get a cut, it’ll heal. If you lose some skin to road rash, it’ll grow back. But lose a limb, and it’s gone for good. Unless you’re a salamander, a zebrafish or an axolotl, of course — all of which can regrow missing limbs. Now, scientists find that some of the molecules crucial to that process are at work inside of us.

Confirming that similar processes are working in different species means the scientific community can identify which microRNAs humans lack or have in short supply. Boosting their production in joints could, for example, slow cartilage degradation and maybe stop osteoarthritis. The condition, where joint cartilage degrades and makes moving painful, is one of the most common causes of disability in the world. Currently, the only option for treatment is to replace the joint entirely. If the tissue could be prompted to regenerate itself, then patients could avoid the pain and intense surgeries.

It may be a decade away – far too long for me – but there’s a possibility that researchers might assemble the right combinations of microRNA to heal arthritis.

Full story @ Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage, Study Finds, Offering Hope for Arthritis Treatment - D-brief
A little research and the right ingredients along with light therapy may be helpful. I made Rod a mixture of herbs, minerals, vitamins and used the cartilage from beef or chicken bones in broth which helped his knee immensely along with a light.

https://www.betterbraces.com/media/Effects of Light Therapy on Cartilage Repair and Osteoarthritis Healing.pdf

Effect of Low-Level Laser Therapy in an Experimental Model of Osteoarthritis in Rats Evaluated Through Raman Spectroscopy
Chicken cartilage does nothing because the body merely digest it as another form of protein. Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM will help with joint issues a little.
"Glucosamine Chondroitin and MSM". I put both of those along with other goodies in his daily mix. A bone in his hand that was broken when he was in his twenties he never had taken care of was also breaking frequently and the super mix seemed to help that too.

Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats. - PubMed - NCBI
Chicken cartilage is a hoax, all you can experience is the placebo effect. I press 1200lbs at 54 years old, talk is cheap so I walk the walk
https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems.../collagen-supplements-what-the-research-shows

Taking Stock Of Bone Broth: Sorry, No Cure-All Here

The dumbest thing I have seen is putting collagen cream on the skin, this can do nothing except moisturize the skin with the included cream. See surface skin is all dead, nothing you can put on it will rejuvenate it even though old bags waste billions on this
 

RodISHI

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The cartilage from the chicken bones and beef bones have a lot of proteoglycan in them. If one is taking N-acetyl glucosamine supplements and Hyaluronic acid orally to help relieve joint pain after age 60 adding some of the bone broth may help.

N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan containing supplement improves the locomotor functions of subjects with knee pain. - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan-containing supplement (NGPS) on knee pain and locomotor functions in middle-aged and elderly persons with knee pain. An open trial was conducted on 19 subjects suffering from knee pain. The subjects, aged (55.6 ± 6.9) years, were given the NGPS tablets, which they must take 3 times per day, that contain 526.5 mg of N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) and 33.6 mg of proteoglycan for 12 weeks. Subjective pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), while the function of the knee with regard to daily operation was evaluated using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Score (JKOM). Walking, stair-climbing and swelling were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association Score (JOA). These items were evaluated at a baseline, and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of NGPS treatment. The VAS scores at 8 (p = 0.004) and 12 (p < 0.001) weeks were significantly lower than that at the baseline. The JKOM total score was significantly lower at 8 and 12 weeks (p = 0.001) than that at the baseline. The JOA score in the more painful side of the leg was significantly higher at 12 weeks (p = 0.002) than that at the baseline. The present study reveals that intake of NGPS is effective for relieving knee pain and improving knee function when walking or climbing stairs, swelling and bending or stretching.

Oral hyaluronan relieves knee pain: a review
Abstract
Hyaluronan (HA) is a component that is particularly abundant in the synovial fluid. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials carried out between 2008 and 2015 have proven the effectiveness of HA for the treatment of symptoms associated with synovitis, and particularly, knee pain, relief of synovial effusion or inflammation, and improvement of muscular knee strength. The mechanism by which HA exerts its effects in the living body, specifically receptor binding in the intestinal epithelia, has gradually been clarified. This review examines the effects of HA upon knee pain as assessed in clinical trials, as well as the mechanism of these effects and the safety of HA...
 

Frannie

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The cartilage from the chicken bones and beef bones have a lot of proteoglycan in them. If one is taking N-acetyl glucosamine supplements and Hyaluronic acid orally to help relieve joint pain after age 60 adding some of the bone broth may help.

N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan containing supplement improves the locomotor functions of subjects with knee pain. - PubMed - NCBI

Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of N-acetyl glucosamine and proteoglycan-containing supplement (NGPS) on knee pain and locomotor functions in middle-aged and elderly persons with knee pain. An open trial was conducted on 19 subjects suffering from knee pain. The subjects, aged (55.6 ± 6.9) years, were given the NGPS tablets, which they must take 3 times per day, that contain 526.5 mg of N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) and 33.6 mg of proteoglycan for 12 weeks. Subjective pain was evaluated using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), while the function of the knee with regard to daily operation was evaluated using the Japanese Knee Osteoarthritis Score (JKOM). Walking, stair-climbing and swelling were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association Score (JOA). These items were evaluated at a baseline, and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of NGPS treatment. The VAS scores at 8 (p = 0.004) and 12 (p < 0.001) weeks were significantly lower than that at the baseline. The JKOM total score was significantly lower at 8 and 12 weeks (p = 0.001) than that at the baseline. The JOA score in the more painful side of the leg was significantly higher at 12 weeks (p = 0.002) than that at the baseline. The present study reveals that intake of NGPS is effective for relieving knee pain and improving knee function when walking or climbing stairs, swelling and bending or stretching.

Oral hyaluronan relieves knee pain: a review
Abstract
Hyaluronan (HA) is a component that is particularly abundant in the synovial fluid. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trials carried out between 2008 and 2015 have proven the effectiveness of HA for the treatment of symptoms associated with synovitis, and particularly, knee pain, relief of synovial effusion or inflammation, and improvement of muscular knee strength. The mechanism by which HA exerts its effects in the living body, specifically receptor binding in the intestinal epithelia, has gradually been clarified. This review examines the effects of HA upon knee pain as assessed in clinical trials, as well as the mechanism of these effects and the safety of HA...
I said Glucosamine worked, I also said chicken cartilage is a waste of time because the body just sees another protein source in a pill or broth. The best thing to help with bone density is not calcium but vitamin K2 with D3 as it not only improves bone and teeth strength but also directs calcium out of the coronary arteries

Vitamin Shoppe

The Synergistic Interplay between Vitamins D and K for Bone and Cardiovascular Health: A Narrative Review

 

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