CDZ How Can "Another Ferguson" be Prevented?

Figaro

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
 

Asclepias

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
You cant take the power of a cop away from apprehending a suspect. First of all a crooked cop is going to find a loophole or a way to get around any policy change. The law enforcement agency needs to change the selection criteria for its cops. They actively recruit people with power issues that wish to control others. The people doing the selecting tend to be ingrained racists

Second of all the racism is abundant in the higher levels and the followers always reflect the leaders. There wont be much meat to any policy changes with the same people in power.
 

tipofthespear

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Human beings are not perfect beings, regardless of what their career is. Humans will always make mistakes/poor decisions. Racism is a reality in life, and not just in the US. I don't think it is even possible to prevent "another Ferguson." I suppose that Police Departments should strive to properly train their Officers on how to deal with the public they serve, and I suspect many of them do. However, to believe that the problem lies only with the Police is not rational.

There are many social issues that need to be addressed which could help in reducing the number of incidents such as what happened in Ferguson. As well, the rush to judgment in this case proved to be almost as damaging as the actual event itself.
 

Darkwind

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Yes.

The perp can harm, kill, or take someone hostage while the cops are waiting for backups.

They already back off in car chases when it becomes obvious that the pursuit is more of a danger to the public than the runner. But that is the key. The actual pursuit has to pose a threat to the public, not a threat to the perp.
 

georgephillip

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The next Ferguson is inevitable unless we define the source of the conflict correctly:

"Will the recent rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, be a tipping point in the struggle against racial injustice, or will it be a minor footnote in some future grad student’s thesis on Civil Unrest in the Early Twenty-First Century?"

Last August, Kareem Abdul Jabbar wrote a column for Time Magazine in which he answered his question by asking readers to remember events that took place some 44 years earlier in Ohio.

"You probably have heard of the Kent State shootings: on May 4, 1970, the Ohio National Guard opened fire on student protesters at Kent State University. During those 13 seconds of gunfire, four students were killed and nine were wounded, one of whom was permanently paralyzed.

"The shock and outcry resulted in a nationwide strike of 4 million students that closed more than 450 campuses.

"Five days after the shooting, 100,000 protesters gathered in Washington, D.C.

"And the nation’s youth was energetically mobilized to end the Vietnam War, racism, sexism, and mindless faith in the political establishment.

Ferguson The Coming Race War Won t Be About Race

I believe Kareem draws the correct conclusion from Ferguson and Kent State: the mindless faith in a political establishment ruled by economic elites grinding their heels into the necks of the poor to increase their already sizable fortunes guarantees...

"The Coming Race War Won’t Be About Race"
 

Missourian

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Folks can stop committing strong arm robbery, stop resisting arrest, refrain from assaulting a police officer, and then not try to bumrush that police officer instead of surrendering.

Of course, not each part individually, but altogether as part of the same incident.

Problem solved.
 

HereWeGoAgain

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Thats easy..shoot to kill.
 

georgephillip

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Folks can stop committing strong arm robbery, stop resisting arrest, refrain from assaulting a police officer, and then not try to bumrush that police officer instead of surrendering.

Of course, not each part individually, but altogether as part of the same incident.

Problem solved.
For Big Mike maybe.
Not so much for the poor living in Ferguson and other third world-like hell holes where the American Dream has morphed into a never ending nightmare of pay day loans and local cops serving as collection agents for corrupt judges.
 

Missourian

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Folks can stop committing strong arm robbery, stop resisting arrest, refrain from assaulting a police officer, and then not try to bumrush that police officer instead of surrendering.

Of course, not each part individually, but altogether as part of the same incident.

Problem solved.
For Big Mike maybe.
Not so much for the poor living in Ferguson and other third world-like hell holes where the American Dream has morphed into a never ending nightmare of pay day loans and local cops serving as collection agents for corrupt judges.
Sounds like it's the communities responsibility to clean up their township. How did they allow this in the first place? The citizens of the county seat of my county petitioned the State Auditors Office to audit the township when they felt the city government was not operating in the best interests of the city.

BOLIVAR, Mo. -- The residents of Bolivar had concerns about their city's management.

So in 2013 the public asked the state auditor to run through the records, going back to 2008.

And the result of that request was a 50 page report given to the public in December outlining all the ways the city went wrong.

"You've got serious financial problems, there was just bad financial planning for several years," State Auditor Thomas Schweich said in December.
In a meeting last December, residents like Chris Green learned just how deep the problems ran.

"It was eye opening for people in Bolivar," Green said.

Issues included misuse of restricted funds, poor budgeting, and an aquatic center that cost millions more than anticipated.

Notice, there were no riots, no businesses were torched, there was no looting...just citizens responsibly taking their leaders to task for violation of the public trust. Folks resigned, some were voted out and new leaders took their place.

That's how it is done. Citizens doing their civic duty to keep their elected leaders in check, and replace them when the occasion calls for it.

The State didn't do it, the Feds didn't do it, Eric Holder didn't do it, Barrack Obama didn't do it. The citizenry, on their own initiative, got it done.
 

Delta4Embassy

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Only way to prevent another Ferguson (assume you mean the riots) is outlaw media coverage of police matters. Make it like the military and that's a no-no without special permission.

The media is directly and massively to blame for the riots. People behave very differently in front of a camera.
 

RetiredGySgt

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A thug assaulted a cop and when ordered to surrender tried to attack the cop again. The color of the two men has nothing to do with the facts. Other then to allow race pimps the opportunity to lie cloud and obfuscate those facts. The President made it worse by ignoring those facts and spouting off about something he knew nothing about as did the Governor of the State.

If another thug attacks a cop I hope the cops respond appropriately and in defense of life if necessary fire on said perp.
 

Asclepias

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Only way to prevent another Ferguson (assume you mean the riots) is outlaw media coverage of police matters. Make it like the military and that's a no-no without special permission.

The media is directly and massively to blame for the riots. People behave very differently in front of a camera.
Thats not a very intelligent way to deal with it. You cant supress the media. The riots were not caused by the media. The riots were caused by the corrupt PD as shown in the report proving their racism and racist tactics in dealing with the public.
 
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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Yeah right , then when a cop flees and the guy commits another crime, or harms a civilian, then what?

Here's how you prevent it.

You tighten up standards on police, and you ignore when suspects who fight with police get the shit beat out of them.
 

RetiredGySgt

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This is about law enforcement policy, but may move toward other strategies and ideas for preventing unnecessary deaths.

So, in terms of police policy, would it be a good or bad idea to leave in place the policy of chasing felony suspects? Or should officers be barred from giving chase to any suspect?

If during that chase, the officer finds himself targeted by a threat from the suspect, I think it would be beneficial to have a policy of attempting to flee, if possible, to allow for backup to arrive or other options for ending the altercation.

Again, anything wrong with that?
Only way to prevent another Ferguson (assume you mean the riots) is outlaw media coverage of police matters. Make it like the military and that's a no-no without special permission.

The media is directly and massively to blame for the riots. People behave very differently in front of a camera.
Thats not a very intelligent way to deal with it. You cant supress the media. The riots were not caused by the media. The riots were caused by the corrupt PD as shown in the report proving their racism and racist tactics in dealing with the public.
Holder already admitted that the meme that brown had his hands up was false. Further they have no intention of charging him with a civil rights violation, something about NO actual evidence to support the bullshit claim. You lose on all counts.
 

Jackson

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It's hard to replicate the damage that was done in Ferguson. There aren't any stores left to burn. No more riots for Ferguson. That takes the fun out of it.
 

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