What's new
US Message Board - Political Discussion Forum

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

‘Historic Palestine’ – A Misleading Anachronism

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
15,332
Reaction score
7,950
Points
908
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine. By referring to the land thus without mentioning Jewish history, it also subtly suggests that a Jewish presence is foreign to the region.

This article discusses the origin and evolution of the usage of “Palestine” as a place name and how current notions of “Historic Palestine” are all based on a false understanding of the geographic and political history of the region.

Historic Palestine in today’s usage typically refers to the territory that now comprises Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Here are several recent prominent examples of usage of the term:

  • Saeb Erekat, chief negotiator for the Palestinian Authority, stated in an opinion piece published in the New York Times in May 2019 that the Palestinians recognized Israel on the “1967 border, equivalent to 78 percent of historic Palestine.”'Historic Palestine' – A Misleading Anachronism Which “historic Palestine” was Erekat referring to and does Israel really comprise 78% of this “historic” territory?

  • The Columbia Journalism Review published an article in January 2019 titled “Palestinian citizens of Israel struggle to tell their stories” in which the author claimed that “Historic Palestine under Ottoman and British control had a thriving Arabic press.”[ii] Was Palestine ever a territory under Ottoman control?

  • A June 2019 article in The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs about Trump’s “Deal of the Century” for Middle East peace states that the deal could leave the “New Palestine” in charge of “about 12 percent of historic Palestine.”[iii] What land area was used to arrive at this figure?

  • President Abbas noted the following in his address to the United Nations in November 2012: “The two-state solution, i.e. the State of Palestine coexisting alongside the State of Israel, represents the spirit and essence of the historic compromise embodied in the Oslo Declaration of Principles, the agreement signed 19 years ago between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the Government of Israel under the auspices of the United States of America on the White House Lawn, a compromise by which the Palestinian people accepted to establish their state on only 22% of the territory of historic Palestine for the sake of making peace.”[iv] Is this 22% number accurate?


(Comment)

It's an extensively informative article.

But there's a very simple basic question - why do all lectures on this "Historic Palestine" narrative,
the pictures, stories and all discourse - always start at some late point , 30-40 years into Zionist enterprise, after the land and its economy has been already progressively rejuvenating,
drying the vast swamps, building new cities?

And of course, thus dodging the preceding Arab pogroms,
that destroy the alleged "disturbed peaceful co-existence" propaganda...
Any reference to a "historic Palestine" can only be a reference to a Jewish Palestine.

Very few Jews lived in Palestine from 70 AD until 1920. Read some history.
Each and every invader, from the Greeks, to the Assyrians ......all the way to the Muslim, Crusaders, Ottomans and British.....always acknowledged that the land later included in the Mandate for Palestine belonged to the Jews, no matter how many were there at any time in history.

It took the Muslims losing that Islamic conquered land to the indigenous Jews, for those Jews all of a sudden become "European refugees" who had no right to the land which was always theirs by right, just as Australia belongs to the Aboriginal people and the Americas belong to the First Nations who inhabited them before the European invaders arrived.


Do you actually read any history? Or the Islamic writings which have confirmed that the land of Israel/Judea actually belonged to the Jews who were indigenous of the place? The Jews the Kurdish and Arab Muslims met when they invaded the land?

The land was renamed Syria Palestine by the Romans, and who's word Palestine was used in the Mandate for Palestine as a continuation of the insult, humiliation meant by the Romans towards the Jews? Same insult, humiliation was meant by the British who gave 78% of the Mandate (only Mandate where this happened) to the Hashemite Muslims, and not the indigenous Jews.
And then the British wanted to keep the rest of the Mandate for themselves, because it was meant for Jews.

Do not worry, no one in history can tell that no Christian or Muslim was ever a Jew hater by their words and deeds.

Herodotus predates the Romans by 500 years.. It was called Syri-Palestine,

The ONLY Hashemite was king Abdullah.

The Arabs do acknowldge the Jews of Palestine.. but Arabs have been there since long before Islam and they didn't immigrate from Europe and Russia.
And still, the Arabs are NOT the indigenous people of the land, as they themselves acknowledge.

Seriously, why would ONE historian in 500 years before the Romans, after the land had been called Canaan and Israel, would make a difference as to who the indigenous people were at the time (as still are) , and their rights to their ancestral land?

Correct, the Arabs immigrated not only from Arabia after the Muslim invasion in the 7th century, but by the end of the 19th century and start of the 20th century they were immigrating from Arabia, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, North Africa and many other places where they had moved to centuries before.

The difference between the European and Arab immigrants to Palestine during that time, is that the Jews were returning to their ancient homeland this time to recreate their ancient Nation, as so many did return to their homeland, Israel, during all the centuries before.....
and the Arabs, continued and continue to be indigenous of the Arabian Peninsula and it is the only territory they can actually call their ancestral home and have any rights over.

Another big difference between Jews and Arabs is that the Jews have wanted to live in peace with the Arabs in a Jewish State, the Arabs want to ethnically clean the Jews from everywhere in the Middle East, just as the Hashemites did in 1925 and 1948.


ONLY King Abdullah was an Hashemite?
What a lonely man. Him alone as an Hashemite against the Saudis from Yemen who invaded his land and took over around WWI.

No wonder he ran for his life!!!!!


And how amazing that the British gave ALL of TransJordan to be populated by only ONE person in 1925 amongst all the Jews who had been there since time immemorial.

ONE Hashemite, King Abdullah.

How did King Abdullah get rid of all the Jews in TransJordan in 1925 ALL by HIMSELF?

ONE Arab against so many Jews. Now, that is true power.

Arabs began migrating to Mesopotama and the Levant 10,000 years ago because receding glaciers caused the Arabian Peninsula to become more arid.

That's why there were Arabs in Palestine at the time of Abraham.. That's why both Moses and Abraham had Arab wives and why Sargon 2 settled 4 Arab tribes in Samaria about 700 BC.

You just don't know your history.
61d022d589550fb1a5415f5254b8edac.jpg
You know what?
This is a thread about "Historic Palestine"

Show me where the Greeks, Romans, Assyrians, Byzantine, etc have written anything about an ancient land called Palestine, and a people called Palestinians.

Even the Kurdish and Arab Muslims did not land on that 'Ancient land" much less dealt with the "ancient Palestinians"

You can repeat that lie about Arab wives instead of Egyptian, all you like. It will never make it true.


Abraham and Ishmael NEVER stepped in Arabia, never took Arab wives, never had Arab children.

Keturah and Zipporah were Arabs. Abraham had six sons by his Arab wife Keturah.. Have you NEVER read the Bible?

The Greeks called it Syria-Palestine in 500 BC.

Chaucer and Shakespeare refer to Palestine.

You sure are ignorant.
You surely are a "Useful idiot" like all the other Jew haters who want to shove any story down the Jews ' throat instead of what Genesis and history actually say in order to destroy Israel and make the "Palestinians" the ancient people of the land. What a joke, endless with absolute no end in sight.

Once an idiot......

Genesis and Exodus were written after the Babylonian exile. They are just origin myths.. Every culture has them.. Last time I looked there were over 250 well known orign myths. Did you think Genesis was History???
As I said above:

"A Useful Idiot" intent in rewriting ONE people's history only......and ONLY ONE.

The History of the Jewish People.


You are incapable of learning anything.
 

Sixties Fan

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2017
Messages
20,336
Reaction score
1,868
Points
390
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine. By referring to the land thus without mentioning Jewish history, it also subtly suggests that a Jewish presence is foreign to the region.

This article discusses the origin and evolution of the usage of “Palestine” as a place name and how current notions of “Historic Palestine” are all based on a false understanding of the geographic and political history of the region.

Historic Palestine in today’s usage typically refers to the territory that now comprises Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Here are several recent prominent examples of usage of the term:

  • Saeb Erekat, chief negotiator for the Palestinian Authority, stated in an opinion piece published in the New York Times in May 2019 that the Palestinians recognized Israel on the “1967 border, equivalent to 78 percent of historic Palestine.”'Historic Palestine' – A Misleading Anachronism Which “historic Palestine” was Erekat referring to and does Israel really comprise 78% of this “historic” territory?

  • The Columbia Journalism Review published an article in January 2019 titled “Palestinian citizens of Israel struggle to tell their stories” in which the author claimed that “Historic Palestine under Ottoman and British control had a thriving Arabic press.”[ii] Was Palestine ever a territory under Ottoman control?

  • A June 2019 article in The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs about Trump’s “Deal of the Century” for Middle East peace states that the deal could leave the “New Palestine” in charge of “about 12 percent of historic Palestine.”[iii] What land area was used to arrive at this figure?

  • President Abbas noted the following in his address to the United Nations in November 2012: “The two-state solution, i.e. the State of Palestine coexisting alongside the State of Israel, represents the spirit and essence of the historic compromise embodied in the Oslo Declaration of Principles, the agreement signed 19 years ago between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the Government of Israel under the auspices of the United States of America on the White House Lawn, a compromise by which the Palestinian people accepted to establish their state on only 22% of the territory of historic Palestine for the sake of making peace.”[iv] Is this 22% number accurate?


(Comment)

It's an extensively informative article.

But there's a very simple basic question - why do all lectures on this "Historic Palestine" narrative,
the pictures, stories and all discourse - always start at some late point , 30-40 years into Zionist enterprise, after the land and its economy has been already progressively rejuvenating,
drying the vast swamps, building new cities?

And of course, thus dodging the preceding Arab pogroms,
that destroy the alleged "disturbed peaceful co-existence" propaganda...
Any reference to a "historic Palestine" can only be a reference to a Jewish Palestine.

Very few Jews lived in Palestine from 70 AD until 1920. Read some history.
Each and every invader, from the Greeks, to the Assyrians ......all the way to the Muslim, Crusaders, Ottomans and British.....always acknowledged that the land later included in the Mandate for Palestine belonged to the Jews, no matter how many were there at any time in history.

It took the Muslims losing that Islamic conquered land to the indigenous Jews, for those Jews all of a sudden become "European refugees" who had no right to the land which was always theirs by right, just as Australia belongs to the Aboriginal people and the Americas belong to the First Nations who inhabited them before the European invaders arrived.


Do you actually read any history? Or the Islamic writings which have confirmed that the land of Israel/Judea actually belonged to the Jews who were indigenous of the place? The Jews the Kurdish and Arab Muslims met when they invaded the land?

The land was renamed Syria Palestine by the Romans, and who's word Palestine was used in the Mandate for Palestine as a continuation of the insult, humiliation meant by the Romans towards the Jews? Same insult, humiliation was meant by the British who gave 78% of the Mandate (only Mandate where this happened) to the Hashemite Muslims, and not the indigenous Jews.
And then the British wanted to keep the rest of the Mandate for themselves, because it was meant for Jews.

Do not worry, no one in history can tell that no Christian or Muslim was ever a Jew hater by their words and deeds.

Herodotus predates the Romans by 500 years.. It was called Syri-Palestine,

The ONLY Hashemite was king Abdullah.

The Arabs do acknowldge the Jews of Palestine.. but Arabs have been there since long before Islam and they didn't immigrate from Europe and Russia.
And still, the Arabs are NOT the indigenous people of the land, as they themselves acknowledge.

Seriously, why would ONE historian in 500 years before the Romans, after the land had been called Canaan and Israel, would make a difference as to who the indigenous people were at the time (as still are) , and their rights to their ancestral land?

Correct, the Arabs immigrated not only from Arabia after the Muslim invasion in the 7th century, but by the end of the 19th century and start of the 20th century they were immigrating from Arabia, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, North Africa and many other places where they had moved to centuries before.

The difference between the European and Arab immigrants to Palestine during that time, is that the Jews were returning to their ancient homeland this time to recreate their ancient Nation, as so many did return to their homeland, Israel, during all the centuries before.....
and the Arabs, continued and continue to be indigenous of the Arabian Peninsula and it is the only territory they can actually call their ancestral home and have any rights over.

Another big difference between Jews and Arabs is that the Jews have wanted to live in peace with the Arabs in a Jewish State, the Arabs want to ethnically clean the Jews from everywhere in the Middle East, just as the Hashemites did in 1925 and 1948.


ONLY King Abdullah was an Hashemite?
What a lonely man. Him alone as an Hashemite against the Saudis from Yemen who invaded his land and took over around WWI.

No wonder he ran for his life!!!!!


And how amazing that the British gave ALL of TransJordan to be populated by only ONE person in 1925 amongst all the Jews who had been there since time immemorial.

ONE Hashemite, King Abdullah.

How did King Abdullah get rid of all the Jews in TransJordan in 1925 ALL by HIMSELF?

ONE Arab against so many Jews. Now, that is true power.

Arabs began migrating to Mesopotama and the Levant 10,000 years ago because receding glaciers caused the Arabian Peninsula to become more arid.

That's why there were Arabs in Palestine at the time of Abraham.. That's why both Moses and Abraham had Arab wives and why Sargon 2 settled 4 Arab tribes in Samaria about 700 BC.

You just don't know your history.
61d022d589550fb1a5415f5254b8edac.jpg
You know what?
This is a thread about "Historic Palestine"

Show me where the Greeks, Romans, Assyrians, Byzantine, etc have written anything about an ancient land called Palestine, and a people called Palestinians.

Even the Kurdish and Arab Muslims did not land on that 'Ancient land" much less dealt with the "ancient Palestinians"

You can repeat that lie about Arab wives instead of Egyptian, all you like. It will never make it true.


Abraham and Ishmael NEVER stepped in Arabia, never took Arab wives, never had Arab children.

Keturah and Zipporah were Arabs. Abraham had six sons by his Arab wife Keturah.. Have you NEVER read the Bible?

The Greeks called it Syria-Palestine in 500 BC.

Chaucer and Shakespeare refer to Palestine.

You sure are ignorant.
You surely are a "Useful idiot" like all the other Jew haters who want to shove any story down the Jews ' throat instead of what Genesis and history actually say in order to destroy Israel and make the "Palestinians" the ancient people of the land. What a joke, endless with absolute no end in sight.

Once an idiot......

Genesis and Exodus were written after the Babylonian exile. They are just origin myths.. Every culture has them.. Last time I looked there were over 250 well known orign myths. Did you think Genesis was History???
As I said above:

"A Useful Idiot" intent in rewriting ONE people's history only......and ONLY ONE.

The History of the Jewish People.


You are incapable of learning anything.
Yes, Master.
Whatever you say, My Master.
 

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
15,332
Reaction score
7,950
Points
908
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine. By referring to the land thus without mentioning Jewish history, it also subtly suggests that a Jewish presence is foreign to the region.

This article discusses the origin and evolution of the usage of “Palestine” as a place name and how current notions of “Historic Palestine” are all based on a false understanding of the geographic and political history of the region.

Historic Palestine in today’s usage typically refers to the territory that now comprises Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Here are several recent prominent examples of usage of the term:

  • Saeb Erekat, chief negotiator for the Palestinian Authority, stated in an opinion piece published in the New York Times in May 2019 that the Palestinians recognized Israel on the “1967 border, equivalent to 78 percent of historic Palestine.”'Historic Palestine' – A Misleading Anachronism Which “historic Palestine” was Erekat referring to and does Israel really comprise 78% of this “historic” territory?

  • The Columbia Journalism Review published an article in January 2019 titled “Palestinian citizens of Israel struggle to tell their stories” in which the author claimed that “Historic Palestine under Ottoman and British control had a thriving Arabic press.”[ii] Was Palestine ever a territory under Ottoman control?

  • A June 2019 article in The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs about Trump’s “Deal of the Century” for Middle East peace states that the deal could leave the “New Palestine” in charge of “about 12 percent of historic Palestine.”[iii] What land area was used to arrive at this figure?

  • President Abbas noted the following in his address to the United Nations in November 2012: “The two-state solution, i.e. the State of Palestine coexisting alongside the State of Israel, represents the spirit and essence of the historic compromise embodied in the Oslo Declaration of Principles, the agreement signed 19 years ago between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the Government of Israel under the auspices of the United States of America on the White House Lawn, a compromise by which the Palestinian people accepted to establish their state on only 22% of the territory of historic Palestine for the sake of making peace.”[iv] Is this 22% number accurate?


(Comment)

It's an extensively informative article.

But there's a very simple basic question - why do all lectures on this "Historic Palestine" narrative,
the pictures, stories and all discourse - always start at some late point , 30-40 years into Zionist enterprise, after the land and its economy has been already progressively rejuvenating,
drying the vast swamps, building new cities?

And of course, thus dodging the preceding Arab pogroms,
that destroy the alleged "disturbed peaceful co-existence" propaganda...
Any reference to a "historic Palestine" can only be a reference to a Jewish Palestine.

Very few Jews lived in Palestine from 70 AD until 1920. Read some history.
Each and every invader, from the Greeks, to the Assyrians ......all the way to the Muslim, Crusaders, Ottomans and British.....always acknowledged that the land later included in the Mandate for Palestine belonged to the Jews, no matter how many were there at any time in history.

It took the Muslims losing that Islamic conquered land to the indigenous Jews, for those Jews all of a sudden become "European refugees" who had no right to the land which was always theirs by right, just as Australia belongs to the Aboriginal people and the Americas belong to the First Nations who inhabited them before the European invaders arrived.


Do you actually read any history? Or the Islamic writings which have confirmed that the land of Israel/Judea actually belonged to the Jews who were indigenous of the place? The Jews the Kurdish and Arab Muslims met when they invaded the land?

The land was renamed Syria Palestine by the Romans, and who's word Palestine was used in the Mandate for Palestine as a continuation of the insult, humiliation meant by the Romans towards the Jews? Same insult, humiliation was meant by the British who gave 78% of the Mandate (only Mandate where this happened) to the Hashemite Muslims, and not the indigenous Jews.
And then the British wanted to keep the rest of the Mandate for themselves, because it was meant for Jews.

Do not worry, no one in history can tell that no Christian or Muslim was ever a Jew hater by their words and deeds.

Herodotus predates the Romans by 500 years.. It was called Syri-Palestine,

The ONLY Hashemite was king Abdullah.

The Arabs do acknowldge the Jews of Palestine.. but Arabs have been there since long before Islam and they didn't immigrate from Europe and Russia.
And still, the Arabs are NOT the indigenous people of the land, as they themselves acknowledge.

Seriously, why would ONE historian in 500 years before the Romans, after the land had been called Canaan and Israel, would make a difference as to who the indigenous people were at the time (as still are) , and their rights to their ancestral land?

Correct, the Arabs immigrated not only from Arabia before and after the Muslim invasion in the 7th century, but by the end of the 19th century and start of the 20th century they were immigrating from Arabia, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, North Africa and many other places where they had moved to centuries before.

The difference between the European and Arab immigrants to Palestine during that time, is that the Jews were returning to their ancient homeland this time to recreate their ancient Nation, as so many did return to their homeland, Israel, during all the centuries before.....
and the Arabs, continued and continue to be indigenous of the Arabian Peninsula and it is the only territory they can actually call their ancestral home and have any rights over.

Another big difference between Jews and Arabs is that the Jews have wanted to live in peace with the Arabs in a Jewish State, the Arabs want to ethnically clean the Jews from everywhere in the Middle East, just as the Hashemites did in 1925 and 1948.


ONLY King Abdullah was an Hashemite?
What a lonely man. Him alone as an Hashemite against the Saudis from Yemen who invaded his land and took over around WWI.

No wonder he ran for his life!!!!!


And how amazing that the British gave ALL of TransJordan to be populated by only ONE person in 1925 amongst all the Jews who had been there since time immemorial.

ONE Hashemite, King Abdullah.

How did King Abdullah get rid of all the Jews in TransJordan in 1925 ALL by HIMSELF?

ONE Arab against so many Jews. Now, that is true power.

Mercy.. You don't even know who Abdullah was. He was the Emir of Mecca and a sell out to the Zionists.. That's how he came to be King of Jordan. He had declared himself Caliph in 1924 and Ibn Saud chased him off the Arabia Peninsula.
 

surada

Platinum Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2021
Messages
15,332
Reaction score
7,950
Points
908
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine. By referring to the land thus without mentioning Jewish history, it also subtly suggests that a Jewish presence is foreign to the region.

This article discusses the origin and evolution of the usage of “Palestine” as a place name and how current notions of “Historic Palestine” are all based on a false understanding of the geographic and political history of the region.

Historic Palestine in today’s usage typically refers to the territory that now comprises Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Here are several recent prominent examples of usage of the term:

  • Saeb Erekat, chief negotiator for the Palestinian Authority, stated in an opinion piece published in the New York Times in May 2019 that the Palestinians recognized Israel on the “1967 border, equivalent to 78 percent of historic Palestine.”'Historic Palestine' – A Misleading Anachronism Which “historic Palestine” was Erekat referring to and does Israel really comprise 78% of this “historic” territory?

  • The Columbia Journalism Review published an article in January 2019 titled “Palestinian citizens of Israel struggle to tell their stories” in which the author claimed that “Historic Palestine under Ottoman and British control had a thriving Arabic press.”[ii] Was Palestine ever a territory under Ottoman control?

  • A June 2019 article in The Washington Report on Middle East Affairs about Trump’s “Deal of the Century” for Middle East peace states that the deal could leave the “New Palestine” in charge of “about 12 percent of historic Palestine.”[iii] What land area was used to arrive at this figure?

  • President Abbas noted the following in his address to the United Nations in November 2012: “The two-state solution, i.e. the State of Palestine coexisting alongside the State of Israel, represents the spirit and essence of the historic compromise embodied in the Oslo Declaration of Principles, the agreement signed 19 years ago between the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the Government of Israel under the auspices of the United States of America on the White House Lawn, a compromise by which the Palestinian people accepted to establish their state on only 22% of the territory of historic Palestine for the sake of making peace.”[iv] Is this 22% number accurate?


(Comment)

It's an extensively informative article.

But there's a very simple basic question - why do all lectures on this "Historic Palestine" narrative,
the pictures, stories and all discourse - always start at some late point , 30-40 years into Zionist enterprise, after the land and its economy has been already progressively rejuvenating,
drying the vast swamps, building new cities?

And of course, thus dodging the preceding Arab pogroms,
that destroy the alleged "disturbed peaceful co-existence" propaganda...
Any reference to a "historic Palestine" can only be a reference to a Jewish Palestine.

Very few Jews lived in Palestine from 70 AD until 1920. Read some history.
Each and every invader, from the Greeks, to the Assyrians ......all the way to the Muslim, Crusaders, Ottomans and British.....always acknowledged that the land later included in the Mandate for Palestine belonged to the Jews, no matter how many were there at any time in history.

It took the Muslims losing that Islamic conquered land to the indigenous Jews, for those Jews all of a sudden become "European refugees" who had no right to the land which was always theirs by right, just as Australia belongs to the Aboriginal people and the Americas belong to the First Nations who inhabited them before the European invaders arrived.


Do you actually read any history? Or the Islamic writings which have confirmed that the land of Israel/Judea actually belonged to the Jews who were indigenous of the place? The Jews the Kurdish and Arab Muslims met when they invaded the land?

The land was renamed Syria Palestine by the Romans, and who's word Palestine was used in the Mandate for Palestine as a continuation of the insult, humiliation meant by the Romans towards the Jews? Same insult, humiliation was meant by the British who gave 78% of the Mandate (only Mandate where this happened) to the Hashemite Muslims, and not the indigenous Jews.
And then the British wanted to keep the rest of the Mandate for themselves, because it was meant for Jews.

Do not worry, no one in history can tell that no Christian or Muslim was ever a Jew hater by their words and deeds.

Herodotus predates the Romans by 500 years.. It was called Syri-Palestine,

The ONLY Hashemite was king Abdullah.

The Arabs do acknowldge the Jews of Palestine.. but Arabs have been there since long before Islam and they didn't immigrate from Europe and Russia.
And still, the Arabs are NOT the indigenous people of the land, as they themselves acknowledge.

Seriously, why would ONE historian in 500 years before the Romans, after the land had been called Canaan and Israel, would make a difference as to who the indigenous people were at the time (as still are) , and their rights to their ancestral land?

Correct, the Arabs immigrated not only from Arabia after the Muslim invasion in the 7th century, but by the end of the 19th century and start of the 20th century they were immigrating from Arabia, Syria, Iraq, Egypt, Lebanon, North Africa and many other places where they had moved to centuries before.

The difference between the European and Arab immigrants to Palestine during that time, is that the Jews were returning to their ancient homeland this time to recreate their ancient Nation, as so many did return to their homeland, Israel, during all the centuries before.....
and the Arabs, continued and continue to be indigenous of the Arabian Peninsula and it is the only territory they can actually call their ancestral home and have any rights over.

Another big difference between Jews and Arabs is that the Jews have wanted to live in peace with the Arabs in a Jewish State, the Arabs want to ethnically clean the Jews from everywhere in the Middle East, just as the Hashemites did in 1925 and 1948.


ONLY King Abdullah was an Hashemite?
What a lonely man. Him alone as an Hashemite against the Saudis from Yemen who invaded his land and took over around WWI.

No wonder he ran for his life!!!!!


And how amazing that the British gave ALL of TransJordan to be populated by only ONE person in 1925 amongst all the Jews who had been there since time immemorial.

ONE Hashemite, King Abdullah.

How did King Abdullah get rid of all the Jews in TransJordan in 1925 ALL by HIMSELF?

ONE Arab against so many Jews. Now, that is true power.

Arabs began migrating to Mesopotama and the Levant 10,000 years ago because receding glaciers caused the Arabian Peninsula to become more arid.

That's why there were Arabs in Palestine at the time of Abraham.. That's why both Moses and Abraham had Arab wives and why Sargon 2 settled 4 Arab tribes in Samaria about 700 BC.

You just don't know your history.
61d022d589550fb1a5415f5254b8edac.jpg
You know what?
This is a thread about "Historic Palestine"

Show me where the Greeks, Romans, Assyrians, Byzantine, etc have written anything about an ancient land called Palestine, and a people called Palestinians.

Even the Kurdish and Arab Muslims did not land on that 'Ancient land" much less dealt with the "ancient Palestinians"

You can repeat that lie about Arab wives instead of Egyptian, all you like. It will never make it true.


Abraham and Ishmael NEVER stepped in Arabia, never took Arab wives, never had Arab children.

Keturah and Zipporah were Arabs. Abraham had six sons by his Arab wife Keturah.. Have you NEVER read the Bible?

The Greeks called it Syria-Palestine in 500 BC.

Chaucer and Shakespeare refer to Palestine.

You sure are ignorant.
You surely are a "Useful idiot" like all the other Jew haters who want to shove any story down the Jews ' throat instead of what Genesis and history actually say in order to destroy Israel and make the "Palestinians" the ancient people of the land. What a joke, endless with absolute no end in sight.

Once an idiot......

Genesis and Exodus were written after the Babylonian exile. They are just origin myths.. Every culture has them.. Last time I looked there were over 250 well known orign myths. Did you think Genesis was History???
As I said above:

"A Useful Idiot" intent in rewriting ONE people's history only......and ONLY ONE.

The History of the Jewish People.


You are incapable of learning anything.
Yes, Master.
Whatever you say, My Master.

I feel sorry for you.. You have NO education.
 

P F Tinmore

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
62,380
Reaction score
2,897
Points
1,815
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine.
OK, but if you look at the history of the US, for example, it starts hundreds of years before 1776. The people of the country precede the formation of the state. This is the same all over.

 

Hollie

Diamond Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2012
Messages
40,755
Reaction score
5,586
Points
1,830
“Historic Palestine” is a commonly-used term when discussing the Arab-Israeli conflict. The phrase suggests that a nation known as Palestine existed in the past, with the word “historic” giving the impression that this nation has deep roots in the region and thus has a natural claim to be revived in the form of a modern state called Palestine.
OK, but if you look at the history of the US, for example, it starts hundreds of years before 1776. The people of the country precede the formation of the state. This is the same all over.
OK, but of course you're wrong. There was no country of the US before 1776. So no, its not the same all over.

There was no ''country of Pal'istan'' before there was a ''State of Pal'istan'' in spite of your insistence that the Treaty of Lausanne invented your imagined 'state' or 'country' of Pal'istan.
 
OP
rylah

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
14,435
Reaction score
2,941
Points
290

Palestinian false claim of continuity

Have Arabs been in the area west of the Jordan River from time immemorial?

rahel1.jpg


In 1881, Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, a leading British cartographer and Dean of Westminster Abbey, reported that “in Judea it is hardly an exaggeration to say that for miles and miles there was no appearance of life or habitation” (Sinai and Palestine in Connection with Their History, New York 1895, pp. 184-186).

The Egyptian immigration

According to Arieh Avneri, a ground-breaking historian of Arab and Jewish migration to Palestine (The Claim of Dispossession, 1980), during the Egyptian conquest (1831-1840), “there was a limited influx of some thousands of [Egyptian] immigrants, whom Ibrahim Pasha [the ruler of Egypt] brought in to settle the empty stretches of the country. Before them, a goodly number of Egyptians had fled Egypt, seeking to evade the military draft…. They sought sanctuary with the governor of Acre, who granted it readily.”

The French-Egyptian scholar, Muhammad Sabry [The Egyptian Empire under Mohammed Ali and the question of the Orient, 1930], confirmed that “the Governor of Acre encouraged the migration of fellaheen [peasants] from Egypt and gave them shelter…. In 1831, more than 6,000 fellaheen crossed the Egyptian border…. After he conquered Palestine, not only did Mohammed Ali [Ibrahim Pasha’s father] refrain from sending back the draft evaders to Egypt, but he sent new settlers to consolidate his rule…. The Egyptian ruler also brought the Bedouin slave-tribe, Arab ed-Damair….”

Avneri highlights (ibid.) many documents published by the British Palestine Exploration Fund. For instance:

“Most of Jaffa was made up of Egyptian-populated districts…. Philip Baldensperger [a renowned anthropologist] stated that in 1893, the inhabitants of many villages in the southern part of the country [between Gaza and Tulkarem] were of Egyptian origin…. The dwellers of some parts of the south were originally brought to Palestine from Libya…. Hundreds of families of Egyptian origin accompanied the conquering forces of Ibrahim Pasha…. Similarly, in the cities of Samaria and Judea there are hundreds of families which, to this day, are named Masri [the Egyptian]…. Before WW1, Egyptian laborers worked on the reclamation of the swamp-lands…. Egyptians participated in the laying of the railroad tracks from Jerusalem to Jaffa, and thereafter remained in the country….

“According to Baldensperger, the existing population in Jaffa contained at least twenty-five different nationalities [mostly Egyptians, but also Syrians, Yemenites, Persians, Afghanis, Hindus and Baluchis]….

Additional Arab/Moslem migrants

Avneri adds (ibid.) that “in 1856, the French [conquerors of Algeria] permitted Abd al-Qadir al-Husseini [the leader of the anti-French rebellion] to leave Algeria together with some followers. Some went to Syria and others to Palestine…. These immigrants were called Mughrabis [originating in the Maghreb, North Africa]. They founded four villages in the Lower Galilee…. Quite a number of Mughrabis settled in Safed, and probably in Tiberias….

“In 1914, Masterman [British Palestine Exploration Fund] described the Moslem population of Safed as being of mixed origin. One of the neighborhoods was called Hareth el-Karad, which denotes a population of Kurdish origin…. Half of the Moslem population of Safed were Mughrabis…. Other Moslem Arabs were immigrants from Damascus and Bedouins from the Jordan Valley…. In 1893, Baldensperger wrote [British Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly] about the Mughrabis of Jaffa…. The Persians, Afghans, Hindus and Baluchis were engaged in commerce….

“In 1878, the Ottoman Sultan, Abd el-Hamid took under his protection Circassian refugees who had fled the Christian-Russian rule in the Caucasus. Many settled in Jordan. Others settled west of the Jordan River in Kafer Kamma, Sarona and Reihaniya. Some Moslems from Bosnia also found refuge in Palestine and settled near Caesarea… Laurence Oliphant [a British traveler, author and diplomat] wrote about one of the Turkoman tribes that pitched their black tents near a Circassian village, arriving from the mountains of Iraq…. In 1908, a group of Arabs arrived in Jaffa from Yemen and settled there….

“In 1878, Claude Reignier Conder [British Palestine Exploration Fund] reported that the large Jezreel Valley was the refuge of the Bedouins whenever war or famine threatened their existence in Jordan…. In 1870, only a sixth of the lands were ploughed, because the valley was occupied by Bedouins…. The same phenomenon occurred in the southern part of the country [e.g., from the Hebron area and southward]….

Infrastructure projects enticed Arab immigration

Avneri adds (ibid.): “The building of the Jerusalem-Jaffa railroad [inaugurated in 1892] employed many local and outside labor. The Belgian company that built the railroad imported Egyptian laborers, many of whom remained in the country. At the start of the 20th century, work on the railway track between Haifa and Dera’a [in southwestern Syria] began. At the outbreak of WW1, the Haifa-Nablus railroad was launched…. Many workers were imported from neighboring countries….

“In 1880, Haifa was a small town of 6,000 souls. In 1910 it tripled to 18,000 inhabitants, of whom 15,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Many of the newcomers were from Lebanon and Syria…. Jaffa developed as a port city… through which passed pilgrims…. Some of them remained in Jaffa. Jaffa’s population doubled during 1890-1910, numbering 43,000 of whom 30,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Also, a large number of pilgrims from North Africa settled in Jerusalem amidst their countrymen, who arrived in earlier times….

“The rapid population growth in Jaffa and Haifa (following the British victory in WW1) was, in large part, due to the influx of many Egyptian laborers, policemen, contractors, foremen and businessmen, who accompanied the advance of the British Army…. The building of the railroad to Qantara on the Egyptian border employed thousands of Egyptians, many of whom preferred to settle in Haifa….

“The British authorities preferred Egyptian, Syrian or other foreign Arab laborers [ e.g., Sudan] – over Jewish immigrants – when it came to erecting military bases, operating quarries, paving roads and the construction of the port of Haifa….

“During 1919-1922, the Arab-Moslem population grew from 515,000 to 590,000, largely, due to Arab immigration….

“The years 1932-1936 were marked by unprecedented economic prosperity… and a considerable influx of Arab immigrants….

“During WW2, there was a severe labor shortage in Palestine. Thousands of Arabs immigrated…. In 1942, the British Mandate issues emergency regulations permitting the British Army to bring laborers from Arab countries….

“The outbreak of violence that occurred from time to time [against Jews and intra-Arab], especially during 1936-1938, drew thousands of Arab mercenaries from the neighboring countries…. Many mercenaries remained in the country….”

Read the entire article:
 

P F Tinmore

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2009
Messages
62,380
Reaction score
2,897
Points
1,815

Palestinian false claim of continuity

Have Arabs been in the area west of the Jordan River from time immemorial?

rahel1.jpg


In 1881, Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, a leading British cartographer and Dean of Westminster Abbey, reported that “in Judea it is hardly an exaggeration to say that for miles and miles there was no appearance of life or habitation” (Sinai and Palestine in Connection with Their History, New York 1895, pp. 184-186).

The Egyptian immigration

According to Arieh Avneri, a ground-breaking historian of Arab and Jewish migration to Palestine (The Claim of Dispossession, 1980), during the Egyptian conquest (1831-1840), “there was a limited influx of some thousands of [Egyptian] immigrants, whom Ibrahim Pasha [the ruler of Egypt] brought in to settle the empty stretches of the country. Before them, a goodly number of Egyptians had fled Egypt, seeking to evade the military draft…. They sought sanctuary with the governor of Acre, who granted it readily.”

The French-Egyptian scholar, Muhammad Sabry [The Egyptian Empire under Mohammed Ali and the question of the Orient, 1930], confirmed that “the Governor of Acre encouraged the migration of fellaheen [peasants] from Egypt and gave them shelter…. In 1831, more than 6,000 fellaheen crossed the Egyptian border…. After he conquered Palestine, not only did Mohammed Ali [Ibrahim Pasha’s father] refrain from sending back the draft evaders to Egypt, but he sent new settlers to consolidate his rule…. The Egyptian ruler also brought the Bedouin slave-tribe, Arab ed-Damair….”

Avneri highlights (ibid.) many documents published by the British Palestine Exploration Fund. For instance:

“Most of Jaffa was made up of Egyptian-populated districts…. Philip Baldensperger [a renowned anthropologist] stated that in 1893, the inhabitants of many villages in the southern part of the country [between Gaza and Tulkarem] were of Egyptian origin…. The dwellers of some parts of the south were originally brought to Palestine from Libya…. Hundreds of families of Egyptian origin accompanied the conquering forces of Ibrahim Pasha…. Similarly, in the cities of Samaria and Judea there are hundreds of families which, to this day, are named Masri [the Egyptian]…. Before WW1, Egyptian laborers worked on the reclamation of the swamp-lands…. Egyptians participated in the laying of the railroad tracks from Jerusalem to Jaffa, and thereafter remained in the country….

“According to Baldensperger, the existing population in Jaffa contained at least twenty-five different nationalities [mostly Egyptians, but also Syrians, Yemenites, Persians, Afghanis, Hindus and Baluchis]….

Additional Arab/Moslem migrants

Avneri adds (ibid.) that “in 1856, the French [conquerors of Algeria] permitted Abd al-Qadir al-Husseini [the leader of the anti-French rebellion] to leave Algeria together with some followers. Some went to Syria and others to Palestine…. These immigrants were called Mughrabis [originating in the Maghreb, North Africa]. They founded four villages in the Lower Galilee…. Quite a number of Mughrabis settled in Safed, and probably in Tiberias….

“In 1914, Masterman [British Palestine Exploration Fund] described the Moslem population of Safed as being of mixed origin. One of the neighborhoods was called Hareth el-Karad, which denotes a population of Kurdish origin…. Half of the Moslem population of Safed were Mughrabis…. Other Moslem Arabs were immigrants from Damascus and Bedouins from the Jordan Valley…. In 1893, Baldensperger wrote [British Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly] about the Mughrabis of Jaffa…. The Persians, Afghans, Hindus and Baluchis were engaged in commerce….

“In 1878, the Ottoman Sultan, Abd el-Hamid took under his protection Circassian refugees who had fled the Christian-Russian rule in the Caucasus. Many settled in Jordan. Others settled west of the Jordan River in Kafer Kamma, Sarona and Reihaniya. Some Moslems from Bosnia also found refuge in Palestine and settled near Caesarea… Laurence Oliphant [a British traveler, author and diplomat] wrote about one of the Turkoman tribes that pitched their black tents near a Circassian village, arriving from the mountains of Iraq…. In 1908, a group of Arabs arrived in Jaffa from Yemen and settled there….

“In 1878, Claude Reignier Conder [British Palestine Exploration Fund] reported that the large Jezreel Valley was the refuge of the Bedouins whenever war or famine threatened their existence in Jordan…. In 1870, only a sixth of the lands were ploughed, because the valley was occupied by Bedouins…. The same phenomenon occurred in the southern part of the country [e.g., from the Hebron area and southward]….

Infrastructure projects enticed Arab immigration

Avneri adds (ibid.): “The building of the Jerusalem-Jaffa railroad [inaugurated in 1892] employed many local and outside labor. The Belgian company that built the railroad imported Egyptian laborers, many of whom remained in the country. At the start of the 20th century, work on the railway track between Haifa and Dera’a [in southwestern Syria] began. At the outbreak of WW1, the Haifa-Nablus railroad was launched…. Many workers were imported from neighboring countries….

“In 1880, Haifa was a small town of 6,000 souls. In 1910 it tripled to 18,000 inhabitants, of whom 15,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Many of the newcomers were from Lebanon and Syria…. Jaffa developed as a port city… through which passed pilgrims…. Some of them remained in Jaffa. Jaffa’s population doubled during 1890-1910, numbering 43,000 of whom 30,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Also, a large number of pilgrims from North Africa settled in Jerusalem amidst their countrymen, who arrived in earlier times….

“The rapid population growth in Jaffa and Haifa (following the British victory in WW1) was, in large part, due to the influx of many Egyptian laborers, policemen, contractors, foremen and businessmen, who accompanied the advance of the British Army…. The building of the railroad to Qantara on the Egyptian border employed thousands of Egyptians, many of whom preferred to settle in Haifa….

“The British authorities preferred Egyptian, Syrian or other foreign Arab laborers [ e.g., Sudan] – over Jewish immigrants – when it came to erecting military bases, operating quarries, paving roads and the construction of the port of Haifa….

“During 1919-1922, the Arab-Moslem population grew from 515,000 to 590,000, largely, due to Arab immigration….

“The years 1932-1936 were marked by unprecedented economic prosperity… and a considerable influx of Arab immigrants….

“During WW2, there was a severe labor shortage in Palestine. Thousands of Arabs immigrated…. In 1942, the British Mandate issues emergency regulations permitting the British Army to bring laborers from Arab countries….

“The outbreak of violence that occurred from time to time [against Jews and intra-Arab], especially during 1936-1938, drew thousands of Arab mercenaries from the neighboring countries…. Many mercenaries remained in the country….”

Read the entire article:
OK, so?
 
OP
rylah

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
14,435
Reaction score
2,941
Points
290

Palestinian false claim of continuity

Have Arabs been in the area west of the Jordan River from time immemorial?

rahel1.jpg


In 1881, Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, a leading British cartographer and Dean of Westminster Abbey, reported that “in Judea it is hardly an exaggeration to say that for miles and miles there was no appearance of life or habitation” (Sinai and Palestine in Connection with Their History, New York 1895, pp. 184-186).

The Egyptian immigration

According to Arieh Avneri, a ground-breaking historian of Arab and Jewish migration to Palestine (The Claim of Dispossession, 1980), during the Egyptian conquest (1831-1840), “there was a limited influx of some thousands of [Egyptian] immigrants, whom Ibrahim Pasha [the ruler of Egypt] brought in to settle the empty stretches of the country. Before them, a goodly number of Egyptians had fled Egypt, seeking to evade the military draft…. They sought sanctuary with the governor of Acre, who granted it readily.”

The French-Egyptian scholar, Muhammad Sabry [The Egyptian Empire under Mohammed Ali and the question of the Orient, 1930], confirmed that “the Governor of Acre encouraged the migration of fellaheen [peasants] from Egypt and gave them shelter…. In 1831, more than 6,000 fellaheen crossed the Egyptian border…. After he conquered Palestine, not only did Mohammed Ali [Ibrahim Pasha’s father] refrain from sending back the draft evaders to Egypt, but he sent new settlers to consolidate his rule…. The Egyptian ruler also brought the Bedouin slave-tribe, Arab ed-Damair….”

Avneri highlights (ibid.) many documents published by the British Palestine Exploration Fund. For instance:

“Most of Jaffa was made up of Egyptian-populated districts…. Philip Baldensperger [a renowned anthropologist] stated that in 1893, the inhabitants of many villages in the southern part of the country [between Gaza and Tulkarem] were of Egyptian origin…. The dwellers of some parts of the south were originally brought to Palestine from Libya…. Hundreds of families of Egyptian origin accompanied the conquering forces of Ibrahim Pasha…. Similarly, in the cities of Samaria and Judea there are hundreds of families which, to this day, are named Masri [the Egyptian]…. Before WW1, Egyptian laborers worked on the reclamation of the swamp-lands…. Egyptians participated in the laying of the railroad tracks from Jerusalem to Jaffa, and thereafter remained in the country….

“According to Baldensperger, the existing population in Jaffa contained at least twenty-five different nationalities [mostly Egyptians, but also Syrians, Yemenites, Persians, Afghanis, Hindus and Baluchis]….

Additional Arab/Moslem migrants

Avneri adds (ibid.) that “in 1856, the French [conquerors of Algeria] permitted Abd al-Qadir al-Husseini [the leader of the anti-French rebellion] to leave Algeria together with some followers. Some went to Syria and others to Palestine…. These immigrants were called Mughrabis [originating in the Maghreb, North Africa]. They founded four villages in the Lower Galilee…. Quite a number of Mughrabis settled in Safed, and probably in Tiberias….

“In 1914, Masterman [British Palestine Exploration Fund] described the Moslem population of Safed as being of mixed origin. One of the neighborhoods was called Hareth el-Karad, which denotes a population of Kurdish origin…. Half of the Moslem population of Safed were Mughrabis…. Other Moslem Arabs were immigrants from Damascus and Bedouins from the Jordan Valley…. In 1893, Baldensperger wrote [British Palestine Exploration Fund Quarterly] about the Mughrabis of Jaffa…. The Persians, Afghans, Hindus and Baluchis were engaged in commerce….

“In 1878, the Ottoman Sultan, Abd el-Hamid took under his protection Circassian refugees who had fled the Christian-Russian rule in the Caucasus. Many settled in Jordan. Others settled west of the Jordan River in Kafer Kamma, Sarona and Reihaniya. Some Moslems from Bosnia also found refuge in Palestine and settled near Caesarea… Laurence Oliphant [a British traveler, author and diplomat] wrote about one of the Turkoman tribes that pitched their black tents near a Circassian village, arriving from the mountains of Iraq…. In 1908, a group of Arabs arrived in Jaffa from Yemen and settled there….

“In 1878, Claude Reignier Conder [British Palestine Exploration Fund] reported that the large Jezreel Valley was the refuge of the Bedouins whenever war or famine threatened their existence in Jordan…. In 1870, only a sixth of the lands were ploughed, because the valley was occupied by Bedouins…. The same phenomenon occurred in the southern part of the country [e.g., from the Hebron area and southward]….

Infrastructure projects enticed Arab immigration

Avneri adds (ibid.): “The building of the Jerusalem-Jaffa railroad [inaugurated in 1892] employed many local and outside labor. The Belgian company that built the railroad imported Egyptian laborers, many of whom remained in the country. At the start of the 20th century, work on the railway track between Haifa and Dera’a [in southwestern Syria] began. At the outbreak of WW1, the Haifa-Nablus railroad was launched…. Many workers were imported from neighboring countries….

“In 1880, Haifa was a small town of 6,000 souls. In 1910 it tripled to 18,000 inhabitants, of whom 15,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Many of the newcomers were from Lebanon and Syria…. Jaffa developed as a port city… through which passed pilgrims…. Some of them remained in Jaffa. Jaffa’s population doubled during 1890-1910, numbering 43,000 of whom 30,000 were Moslem and Christian Arabs. Also, a large number of pilgrims from North Africa settled in Jerusalem amidst their countrymen, who arrived in earlier times….

“The rapid population growth in Jaffa and Haifa (following the British victory in WW1) was, in large part, due to the influx of many Egyptian laborers, policemen, contractors, foremen and businessmen, who accompanied the advance of the British Army…. The building of the railroad to Qantara on the Egyptian border employed thousands of Egyptians, many of whom preferred to settle in Haifa….

“The British authorities preferred Egyptian, Syrian or other foreign Arab laborers [ e.g., Sudan] – over Jewish immigrants – when it came to erecting military bases, operating quarries, paving roads and the construction of the port of Haifa….

“During 1919-1922, the Arab-Moslem population grew from 515,000 to 590,000, largely, due to Arab immigration….

“The years 1932-1936 were marked by unprecedented economic prosperity… and a considerable influx of Arab immigrants….

“During WW2, there was a severe labor shortage in Palestine. Thousands of Arabs immigrated…. In 1942, the British Mandate issues emergency regulations permitting the British Army to bring laborers from Arab countries….

“The outbreak of violence that occurred from time to time [against Jews and intra-Arab], especially during 1936-1938, drew thousands of Arab mercenaries from the neighboring countries…. Many mercenaries remained in the country….”

Read the entire article:
OK, so?

"Ok, so?"

D4wjf7cWAAAli7K.png
 

watchingfromafar

Gold Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2017
Messages
3,444
Reaction score
559
Points
140
The word Palestine derives from Philistia, the name given by Greek writers to the land of the Philistines, who in the 12th century BCE occupied a small pocket of land on the southern coast, between modern Tel Aviv–Yafo and Gaza. The name was revived by the Romans in the 2nd century CE in “Syria Palaestina,” designating the southern portion of the province of Syria, and made its way thence into Arabic, where it has been used to describe the region at least since the early Islamic era. After Roman times the name had no official status until after World War I and the end of rule by the Ottoman Empire, when it was adopted for one of the regions mandated to Great Britain; in addition to an area roughly comprising present-day Israel and the West Bank, the mandate included the territory east of the Jordan River now constituting the Hashimite Kingdom of Jordan, which Britain placed under an administration separate from that of Palestine immediately after receiving the mandate for the territory.
Palestine | History, People, & Religion | Britannica

Palestine's Early Roots
Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians and Mamelukes. From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region
Palestine - History, Religion & Conflicts - HISTORY

Palestine’s Early Roots
Scholars believe the name “Palestine” originally comes from the word “Philistia,” which refers to the Philistines who occupied part of the region in the 12th century B.C.
Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians and Mamelukes.
From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region.

When World War I ended in 1918, the British took control of Palestine. The League of Nations issued a British mandate for Palestine—a document that gave Britain administrative control over the region, and included provisions for establishing a Jewish national homeland in Palestine—which went into effect in 1923.
Palestine - History, Religion & Conflicts - HISTORY

Palestine (Arabic: فلسطين‎, romanized: Filasṭīn), officially recognized as the State of Palestine (Arabic: دولة فلسطين‎, romanized: Dawlat Filasṭīn) by the United Nations and other entities, is a de jure sovereign state in Western Asia officially governed by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and claiming the West Bank and Gaza Strip with Jerusalem as the designated capital.
State of Palestine - Wikipedia

The history of Palestine is the study of the past in the region of Palestine, defined as the territory between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River.

The region was among the earliest in the world to see human habitation, agricultural communities and civilization.
History of Palestine - Wikipedia

1625419916549.png

:)-
 
OP
rylah

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
14,435
Reaction score
2,941
Points
290
The word Palestine derives from Philistia, the name given by Greek writers to the land of the Philistines, who in the 12th century BCE occupied a small pocket of land on the southern coast, between modern Tel Aviv–Yafo and Gaza. The name was revived by the Romans in the 2nd century CE in “Syria Palaestina,” designating the southern portion of the province of Syria, and made its way thence into Arabic, where it has been used to describe the region at least since the early Islamic era. After Roman times the name had no official status until after World War I and the end of rule by the Ottoman Empire, when it was adopted for one of the regions mandated to Great Britain; in addition to an area roughly comprising present-day Israel and the West Bank, the mandate included the territory east of the Jordan River now constituting the Hashimite Kingdom of Jordan, which Britain placed under an administration separate from that of Palestine immediately after receiving the mandate for the territory.
Palestine | History, People, & Religion | Britannica

Palestine's Early Roots
Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians and Mamelukes. From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region
Palestine - History, Religion & Conflicts - HISTORY

Palestine’s Early Roots
Scholars believe the name “Palestine” originally comes from the word “Philistia,” which refers to the Philistines who occupied part of the region in the 12th century B.C.
Throughout history, Palestine has been ruled by numerous groups, including the Assyrians, Babylonians, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Fatimids, Seljuk Turks, Crusaders, Egyptians and Mamelukes.
From about 1517 to 1917, the Ottoman Empire ruled much of the region.

When World War I ended in 1918, the British took control of Palestine. The League of Nations issued a British mandate for Palestine—a document that gave Britain administrative control over the region, and included provisions for establishing a Jewish national homeland in Palestine—which went into effect in 1923.
Palestine - History, Religion & Conflicts - HISTORY

Palestine (Arabic: فلسطين‎, romanized: Filasṭīn), officially recognized as the State of Palestine (Arabic: دولة فلسطين‎, romanized: Dawlat Filasṭīn) by the United Nations and other entities, is a de jure sovereign state in Western Asia officially governed by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and claiming the West Bank and Gaza Strip with Jerusalem as the designated capital.
State of Palestine - Wikipedia

The history of Palestine is the study of the past in the region of Palestine, defined as the territory between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River.

The region was among the earliest in the world to see human habitation, agricultural communities and civilization.
History of Palestine - Wikipedia

View attachment 508748
:)-

Yep, so much for the Bedouin "sea people" frauds :SMILEW~130:
Can't even pronounce it in the local language,
not to mention explain what it means.

'Philistine' is the Greek version of 'Pleshet',
in local language literally = 'invaders'

 
Last edited:

USMB Server Goals

Total amount
$350.00
Goal
$350.00

New Topics

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top