Harmonica rifle?

Daryl Hunt

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
I heard about that rifle. It didn't work out too well. Sooner or later, it would concussion set off more than one. With that happening from time to time, it was also jam prone which would scare the living hell out of people knowing that there was a chance that a cartridge might fly out the back right into you face. What's a little blindness.
 

fncceo

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Who on Earth uses Bing as a search engine?
 

JGalt

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
I heard about that rifle. It didn't work out too well. Sooner or later, it would concussion set off more than one. With that happening from time to time, it was also jam prone which would scare the living hell out of people knowing that there was a chance that a cartridge might fly out the back right into you face. What's a little blindness.
The weapon is percussion-fired black powder. Chain-fires were common with percussion pistols back then, but not at bad as people think. I have three replica percussion pistols: Two Colt copies and a Remington. After the chambers are loaded, you're supposed to put a dab of bullet lube on the exposed ball, at the front end of the cylinder. That keeps a spark from a fired chamber from arcing over the the adjacent chambers, hence the phrase "chain-fire." I've had three cylinders go off at once and while it did make one hell of a racket, the smoke, fire, and lead fragments exploded out the front of the cylinder. Luckily hardened steel is much harder than soft lead.
 

Ringel05

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
I heard about that rifle. It didn't work out too well. Sooner or later, it would concussion set off more than one. With that happening from time to time, it was also jam prone which would scare the living hell out of people knowing that there was a chance that a cartridge might fly out the back right into you face. What's a little blindness.
The weapon is percussion-fired black powder. Chain-fires were common with percussion pistols back then, but not at bad as people think. I have three replica percussion pistols: Two Colt copies and a Remington. After the chambers are loaded, you're supposed to put a dab of bullet lube on the exposed ball, at the front end of the cylinder. That keeps a spark from a fired chamber from arcing over the the adjacent chambers, hence the phrase "chain-fire." I've had three cylinders go off at once and while it did make one hell of a racket, the smoke, fire, and lead fragments exploded out the front of the cylinder. Luckily hardened steel is much harder than soft lead.
They've tested that theory and discovered chain firing was a result of poorly fitted caps. A ball slightly larger than the cylinder bore when pressed into the cylinder leaves a tiny lead ring effectively sealing the cylinder, no need for lube or grease.
 

JGalt

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
I heard about that rifle. It didn't work out too well. Sooner or later, it would concussion set off more than one. With that happening from time to time, it was also jam prone which would scare the living hell out of people knowing that there was a chance that a cartridge might fly out the back right into you face. What's a little blindness.
The weapon is percussion-fired black powder. Chain-fires were common with percussion pistols back then, but not at bad as people think. I have three replica percussion pistols: Two Colt copies and a Remington. After the chambers are loaded, you're supposed to put a dab of bullet lube on the exposed ball, at the front end of the cylinder. That keeps a spark from a fired chamber from arcing over the the adjacent chambers, hence the phrase "chain-fire." I've had three cylinders go off at once and while it did make one hell of a racket, the smoke, fire, and lead fragments exploded out the front of the cylinder. Luckily hardened steel is much harder than soft lead.
They've tested that theory and discovered chain firing was a result of poorly fitted caps. A ball slightly larger than the cylinder bore when pressed into the cylinder leaves a tiny lead ring effectively sealing the cylinder, no need for lube or grease.
I've read that somewhere too, "poorly fitting caps." I assumed it happened because I didn't put any grease over the chambers. It's was pretty un-nerving.
 

Ringel05

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
I heard about that rifle. It didn't work out too well. Sooner or later, it would concussion set off more than one. With that happening from time to time, it was also jam prone which would scare the living hell out of people knowing that there was a chance that a cartridge might fly out the back right into you face. What's a little blindness.
The weapon is percussion-fired black powder. Chain-fires were common with percussion pistols back then, but not at bad as people think. I have three replica percussion pistols: Two Colt copies and a Remington. After the chambers are loaded, you're supposed to put a dab of bullet lube on the exposed ball, at the front end of the cylinder. That keeps a spark from a fired chamber from arcing over the the adjacent chambers, hence the phrase "chain-fire." I've had three cylinders go off at once and while it did make one hell of a racket, the smoke, fire, and lead fragments exploded out the front of the cylinder. Luckily hardened steel is much harder than soft lead.
They've tested that theory and discovered chain firing was a result of poorly fitted caps. A ball slightly larger than the cylinder bore when pressed into the cylinder leaves a tiny lead ring effectively sealing the cylinder, no need for lube or grease.
I've read that somewhere too, "poorly fitting caps." I assumed it happened because I didn't put any grease over the chambers. It's was pretty un-nerving.
Unnerving is the word...... I know........
 

Daryl Hunt

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harmonica rifle - Bing I thought I was well educated on firearms. I never seen one of these before.I would like to shoot one :)
How about the Puckle Gun?


Or the first flintlock "machine gun"....... The Chambers Flintlock Machine Gun.

yes, it was very rapid in firing in the hands of a very skilled person (Puckle) but when it was purchased and taken into the field it didn't work very well. The problem is, it was just too soon. Given time, it would have been a wonderful weapon. But technology hadn't quite caught up with the gun quite yet. One of the biggest problems I can see is that it was a Flintlock. In bad weather it was worthless. And at sea or along a coast, more likely than not, it's going to be wet.

It was to replace the Swivel Gun and Swivel Canon. Both are single fire and and came in a few flavors. The best was invented in the 16th century that used a breech load where you had preloaded canisters but that was a swivel canon, not really that portable and it was Flintlock. The most common was the Swivel gun which was a single use where you tamped the load and powder down the barrel and used a touch hole. The most common swivel gun had the advantage that you could fire it from it's mount, move it easily and even fire it by holding it. The other advantage of the Swivel Gun and Canon was the different types of rounds it could fire; solid ball, grape shot, fire and a few more. The reason the touch hole swivel gun stayed in service so long was that there were thousands of them in service and they worked. If you fired one, just dump the one you used onto the pile and grab another one from the loaded rack. And when the Pirates were boarding, grab the Grape Shot loaded ones and really raise havoc.

The Pickle gun wasn't nearly as portable as the Swivel Gun so it never got the money to be developed into what it could have been.
 

Shawnee_b

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I have 5 cap and ball revolvers now, shot them for 51 years now. Never had a chain fire. I used to grease or crisco over the ball, = MESSY. Then oxyoke, TC wonder wads came along, between powder and ball it's clean and safe. I wouldn't leave it loaded longer than a range session though the lube will get to the powder eventually. Like Ringle said a proper ball and seating but I'm a bit shy to try that one.
 

JGalt

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I have 5 cap and ball revolvers now, shot them for 51 years now. Never had a chain fire. I used to grease or crisco over the ball, = MESSY. Then oxyoke, TC wonder wads came along, between powder and ball it's clean and safe. I wouldn't leave it loaded longer than a range session though the lube will get to the powder eventually. Like Ringle said a proper ball and seating but I'm a bit shy to try that one.
I bought a 5-gallon bucket of beeswax from some Amish who had bees. Once I purified in an electric pot, I ended up with a shitload of beeswax. Don't remember the exact recipe, but it did make the best bullet lube and thinned a little, the best grease for over the ball.

One thing I found out for sure in never to use petroleum-based lubricants. THose really gum up the works. Now all I use is Ballistol, because it's water-based.
 
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Shawnee_b

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One thing I found out for sure in never to use petroleum-based lubricants. THose really gum up the works. Now all I use is Ballistol, because it's water-based.
Thanks, jogged my cobwebs. Yes beeswax is awesome. many ways. There was also a popular formula, something else mixed in while it was hot. I used to use balistol too, guess the can ran out and I forgot! I use lots of Hoppes 9 of course, CLP breakfree (especially switchblades) and been liking the Lucas oil available even in auto parts stores.
 

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