Fiery Furnaces!

PoliticalChic

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1. I'm reading a book that mentioned the three Jewish folk thrown into a fiery furnace by Nebuchadnezzar because they refused to deny God.


"Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego are men recorded in the book of Daniel Chapters 1–3, known for their exclusive devotion to God. In particular, they are known for being saved by divine intervention from the Babylonian execution of being burned alive in a fiery furnace. They were three young Jews, of royal or noble birth from the Kingdom of Judah, who, along with Daniel, were inducted into Babylon when Jerusalem was occupied by the Babylonians in 606/605 BC, under the campaign of Nebuchadnezzar II, during the first deportation of the Israelites." Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

As I recall, they said that even if God didn't save them, they'd still adhere to their beliefs. The allegorical nature of the tale is pretty clear.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6r1baNdgImo]Louis Armstrong - Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego - YouTube[/ame]





2. A fav opera of mine is Nabucco, by Verdi....he doesn't mention Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, but included the famous Hebrew Slaves chorus...

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2F4G5H_TTvU]Nabucco - Hebrew Slaves Chorus - YouTube[/ame]





a. Verdi was popular with the Italian nationalists trying to unify the nation...." Beginning in Naples in 1859 and spreading throughout Italy, the slogan "Viva VERDI" was used as an acronym for Viva Vittorio EmanueleRe D'Italia (Viva Victor Emmanuel King of Italy), referring to Victor Emmanuel II, then king of Sardinia." Giuseppe Verdi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia






3. The best use of a fiery furnace is found in Robert Service's poem, "The Cremation of Sam McGee."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.



Seems Sam was from Tennessee, and was always cold in the Yukon, so he made his pal promise to cremate him when he died......

"It's the cursed cold, and it's got right hold
Till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead -- it's my awful dread
Of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair,
You'll cremate my last remains."



So he did....but when he opened the door to the furnace....

"I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; . . .
Then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm,
In the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile,
And he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear
You'll let in the cold and storm --
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee,
It's the first time I've been warm."

The Cremation of Sam McGee - Robert W. Service




It's a cold winter......
 

PainefulTruth

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Don't know what you're getting at, but I liked it anyway.

The allegorical nature of the tale is pretty clear
.

OK, but allegorical of what? Faith??? Is that all there is?
 
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PainefulTruth

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Don't know what you're getting at, but I liked it anyway.
Thank you.

Getting at Robert Service's poem.....love it.
Yes, it's cool :redface: :cool:, but I still don't get the connection. That said, it did make this connection in my synapses for no good reason that I can think of. Go figure:

Careless seems the great Avenger; history's pages but record
One death-grapple in the darkness 'twixt old systems and the Word;
Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne,—
Yet that scaffold sways the future, and, behind the dim unknown,
Standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above his own.


The Present Crisis (successor to the American Crisis?)--James Russell Lowell.
 
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PoliticalChic

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Don't know what you're getting at, but I liked it anyway.
Thank you.

Getting at Robert Service's poem.....love it.
Yes, it's cool :redface: :cool:, but I still don't get the connection. That said, it did make this connection in my synapses for no good reason that I can think of. Go figure:

Careless seems the great Avenger; history's pages but record
One death-grapple in the darkness 'twixt old systems and the Word;
Truth forever on the scaffold, Wrong forever on the throne,—
Yet that scaffold sways the future, and, behind the dim unknown,
Standeth God within the shadow, keeping watch above his own.


The Present Crisis (successor to the American Crisis?)--James Russell Lowell.


Lovely....I see the sad truth there.

Funny that you mention Lowell....my daughter's homeschool curriculum included “Life (is a leaf of paper white),” by James Russell Lowell

That poem, in fact, is my reason for posting.....




And, your original question....I post about anything that interests me. When I read about the three tossed into the fiery furnace, it brought to mind Nabucco....

and then Service's poem about cremation.

Sometimes what interests me, interests others.
Like you.
 

Delta4Embassy

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1. I'm reading a book that mentioned the three Jewish folk thrown into a fiery furnace by Nebuchadnezzar because they refused to deny God.


"Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego are men recorded in the book of Daniel Chapters 1–3, known for their exclusive devotion to God. In particular, they are known for being saved by divine intervention from the Babylonian execution of being burned alive in a fiery furnace. They were three young Jews, of royal or noble birth from the Kingdom of Judah, who, along with Daniel, were inducted into Babylon when Jerusalem was occupied by the Babylonians in 606/605 BC, under the campaign of Nebuchadnezzar II, during the first deportation of the Israelites." Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

As I recall, they said that even if God didn't save them, they'd still adhere to their beliefs. The allegorical nature of the tale is pretty clear.

Louis Armstrong - Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego - YouTube





2. A fav opera of mine is Nabucco, by Verdi....he doesn't mention Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, but included the famous Hebrew Slaves chorus...

Nabucco - Hebrew Slaves Chorus - YouTube





a. Verdi was popular with the Italian nationalists trying to unify the nation...." Beginning in Naples in 1859 and spreading throughout Italy, the slogan "Viva VERDI" was used as an acronym for Viva Vittorio EmanueleRe D'Italia (Viva Victor Emmanuel King of Italy), referring to Victor Emmanuel II, then king of Sardinia." Giuseppe Verdi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia






3. The best use of a fiery furnace is found in Robert Service's poem, "The Cremation of Sam McGee."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.



Seems Sam was from Tennessee, and was always cold in the Yukon, so he made his pal promise to cremate him when he died......

"It's the cursed cold, and it's got right hold
Till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead -- it's my awful dread
Of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair,
You'll cremate my last remains."



So he did....but when he opened the door to the furnace....

"I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; . . .
Then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm,
In the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile,
And he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear
You'll let in the cold and storm --
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee,
It's the first time I've been warm."

The Cremation of Sam McGee - Robert W. Service




It's a cold winter......
History Channel's "The Bible" depicted this incident well.
 

PainefulTruth

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Lovely....I see the sad truth there.

Funny that you mention Lowell....my daughter's homeschool curriculum included “Life (is a leaf of paper white),” by James Russell Lowell

That poem, in fact, is my reason for posting.....
Whoa, now there's a full circle for you. It's like an epiphany in a dream which made no sense, except you know what it meant.

 
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PoliticalChic

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Lovely....I see the sad truth there.

Funny that you mention Lowell....my daughter's homeschool curriculum included “Life (is a leaf of paper white),” by James Russell Lowell

That poem, in fact, is my reason for posting.....
Whoa, now there's a full circle for you. It's like an epiphany in a dream which made no sense, except you know what it meant.




This is the part I was referring to.....

"Lo, time and space enough," we cry
To write an epic! so we try."
Lowell
 

Moonglow

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On a cold day I investigate research into the massacres of Jews by Christians during the Black Death Medieval Age.
 
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PoliticalChic

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