Desmond Doss (Hacksaw Ridge)

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Desmond Doss - Wikipedia

Desmond Thomas Doss
(February 7, 1919 – March 23, 2006) was a United States Army corporal and combat medic during World War II. He was assigned to a rifle company of the 1st Battalion, 307th Infantry, 77th Infantry Division, during the Battle of Okinawa, and became the first of three conscientious objectors to receive the Medal of Honor (the others are Thomas W. Bennett and Joseph G. LaPointe Jr.).
That movie looks really good plus its a Mel Gibson movie so automatically go see it.
 

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In Vietnam we had a chaplain:

CAPODANNO, VINCENT R.

  • Rank and Organization: Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Chaplain Corps, 3d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division (Rein), FMF
  • Place and Date: Quang Tin Province, Republic of Vietnam, 4 September 1967
Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Chaplain of the 3d Battalion, in connection with operations against enemy forces. In response to reports that the 2d Platoon of M Company was in danger of being overrun by a massed enemy assaulting force, Lt. Capodanno left the relative safety of the company command post and ran through an open area raked with fire, directly to the beleaguered platoon. Disregarding the intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire, he moved about the battlefield administering last rites to the dying and giving medical aid to the wounded. When an exploding mortar round inflicted painful multiple wounds to his arms and legs, and severed a portion of his right hand, he steadfastly refused all medical aid. Instead, he directed the corpsmen to help their wounded comrades and, with calm vigor, continued to move about the battlefield as he provided encouragement by voice and example to the valiant marines. Upon encountering a wounded corpsman in the direct line of fire of an enemy machine gunner positioned approximately 15 yards away, Lt. Capodanno rushed a daring attempt to aid and assist the mortally wounded corpsman. At that instant, only inches from his goal, he was struck down by a burst of machine gun fire. By his heroic conduct on the battlefield, and his inspiring example, Lt. Capodanno upheld the finest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the cause of freedom.
 
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