Coke & Osteoporosis

Adam's Apple

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A Bone to Pick with Cola?
By Dr. David Katz, ABC News
October 15, 2006

A recent study by investigators at Tufts University suggests that cola soft drink consumption may increase the risk of osteoporosis. If true, this association can be added to a list of potential adverse effects of soda intake that includes obesity, diabetes, dental cares (cavities), and dyspepsia (indigestion and heartburn).

The Tufts study, conducted by Dr. Katharine Tucker and colleagues, and published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, showed an association between cola intake and osteoporosis risk in a group of 2500 adults near age 60 in the Framingham Osteoporosis Study.

The study was observational, rather than a clinical trial in which one group receives an intervention and another does not. Participants were surveyed about their dietary habits, and bone density was assessed using a standard technique called dual-energy absorptiometry. The greater the consumption of cola, including diet cola, and to a lesser extent decaffeinated cola, the lower the bone density. As compared to those reporting cola intake less than once a month, those with daily intake had 3-6% lower bone density measures on average.

for full article:
http://www.davidkatzmd.com/admin/archives/bone to pick.Times.10-15-06.doc
 
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Adam's Apple

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It's a good incentive for me to work harder at breaking my habit of drinking diet Coke or run the risk of possibly looking like Quasimodo (sp???) later in life. :)
 

glockmail

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Makes sense, as the carbonation does dissolve bone, although I'm not sure if it has been shown to lower pH within the body. Also the trade off from tap water would reduce floride intake.
 

CharlestonChad

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Makes sense, as the carbonation does dissolve bone, although I'm not sure if it has been shown to lower pH within the body. Also the trade off from tap water would reduce floride intake.

Nope, carbination is not the reason to lay off the coke. Caffeine is the problem. Calcium uptake is lowered and sometimes removed. The carbination myth came from faulty research in the early 90's, and the reason they believe it did this was because carbinated drinks usually replaced drinking milk.

All caffeine loaded products are bad for health.
 

glockmail

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Nope, carbination is not the reason to lay off the coke. Caffeine is the problem. Calcium uptake is lowered and sometimes removed. The carbination myth came from faulty research in the early 90's, and the reason they believe it did this was because carbinated drinks usually replaced drinking milk.

All caffeine loaded products are bad for health.
Interesting. But I think your blanket statment, last sentence is a little drastic. Coffee has been shown to be good for many people, and of course like nearly everything else it depends on the dose.
 

CharlestonChad

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Interesting. But I think your blanket statment, last sentence is a little drastic. Coffee has been shown to be good for many people, and of course like nearly everything else it depends on the dose.
Yup, my last statement was a little to general. I'll try again:


All caffeine loaded products are bad for anyone still growing.
 

waltky

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Early human trials are underway in the U.S....

Osteoporosis in mice reversed with stem cell therapy
March 17, 2016 - Early trials of the technique are underway with humans in the United States, researchers said.
Donor stem cells injected into mice with age-related osteoporosis led to a restoration of normal bone structure, according to researchers at the University of Toronto. The proof-of-concept study found a single injection of mesenchymal stem cells from healthy mice to those with osteoporosis led to the "surprising" development of normal bone structure. MSCs are capable of becoming any cell, including bone cells, and donors do not need to match recipients because the cells won't be rejected.


In osteoporotic mice that received mesenchymal stem cells taken from healthy mice, bone structure returned to normal in about six months.​

With just one widely available treatment for osteoporosis, which is effective for about two years, researchers said the MSCs could be used to prevent the progressive condition. "We had hoped for a general increase in bone health," John Davies, a professor at the University of Toronto, said in a press release. "But the huge surprise was to find that the exquisite inner 'coral-like' architecture of the bone structure of the injected animals -- which is severely compromised in osteoporosis -- was restored to normal." For the study, published Stem Cells Translational Medicine, researchers took MSCs from healthy mice, injecting them into mice with osteoporosis. Within six months, osteoporotic bones became healthy and functional, the researchers report.

In addition to the study with mice, early trials with humans are underway that could lead to larger clinical trials within the next five years. "It's very exciting," said Dr. Jeff Kiernan, a researcher at the Ottawa Hospital. "We're currently conducting ancillary trials with a research group in the U.S., where elderly patients have been injected with MSCs to study various outcomes. We'll be able to look at those blood samples for biological markers of bone growth and bone reabsorption."

Osteoporosis in mice reversed with stem cell therapy
 

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