Cain's Free Advice to OWS - Blame Yourself!!!

GHook93

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Herman Cain's FREE advice to the Occupiers of Wall Street douch bags! The man hits the nail in the head. His assessment is amazing and his advice is the long road less traveled, but the necessary road to travel down!

There is no one a better fit for the Presidency than Herman Cain.

Occupy Wall Street: Blame yourself
I'm not surprised I got a question like this from Lawrence O'Donnell on MSNBC. Given the mindset of Mr. O'Donnell and most of his colleagues, it's to be expected that he would cite my statement – that Occupy Wall Street protesters have only themselves to blame if they are unemployed or lacking wealth – and ask if I wanted to apologize for saying so.

Not a chance.

In fact, I would add this: Anyone who abandons these protests and tries taking my advice is almost certain to end up better off. That's because it's empowering to you when you stop blaming other people for your situation, and start taking responsibility for yourself.

When Herman Cain speaks, people listen. When he debates, he wins! Get his new release, "This is Herman Cain! My Journey to the White House" – now at the WND Superstore!

Another name the OWS protesters use for themselves is the 99 percent. This is in contrast to the 1 percent of the population whose greater wealth they resent. Their premise is that the 1 percent has been exploiting them, and now the 99 percent is fighting back.

Well …

No one has to tell me about the challenges involved with pursuing success when you are born without a lot of advantages, or to a family without a lot of money. That is the story of my life. I achieved success in business because I worked hard, studied hard, set goals, honed my strategy, weathered setbacks and kept at it no matter what. Sometimes those setbacks occurred because, at least it seemed to me, someone didn't treat me fairly. But I quickly learned that this, too, is part of life. Complaining about it won't help you. Devising strategies to overcome it will.

Pursuing a strategy for personal success is very much like the work a CEO does. A good CEO has to recognize the right opportunities and develop strategies to take advantage of them. There are always problems along the way, of course, so a good CEO has to identify the right problems and work on them effectively so as to overcome them and claim the desired reward.


The person whose strategy is to wave a protest sign and complain about the success of others is not going to be successful at accessing that opportunity. Even at the times in my life when I struggled, I did not embrace the delusion that I lacked what I wanted because someone else had too much. I recognized that a person with wealth was the very person who could offer me an opportunity.

But I learned as I progressed in my career that you're not going to get an opportunity just because you need it, or think you're entitled to it. You're going to get an opportunity because there's something you can offer that person of wealth, or that big capitalist corporation, that makes it a mutually beneficial arrangement for both parties. Maybe there's a skill or knowledge you can offer that person or organization, which will make them more profitable, and make their investment in you a wise one for them. But before you can even try to access opportunity in this way – which is to say, the right way – you have to understand how and why people earn wealth.

The people protesting on Wall Street this week give no indication that they understand this. They don't understand that investors and corporations have to put capital at risk, work hard, make good decisions and bring products and services to market that people consider worth their money to buy. They don't understand that you don't earn until you first effectively serve.

When I say they should blame themselves for their status, they may not realize it, but I'm really putting the power in their hands. You can wave signs and make demands, but there's no reason anyone will want to give you an opportunity if that's all you do – especially when the message you send to those who could give you an opportunity is that you resent them.

If you haven't succeeded to the extent that you've hoped, take the blame. And as you do, take responsibility for your own life. And understand that by setting the right goals, doing the right things, developing the right habits and focusing on the right problems, you have it within your power to achieve more than you've ever imagined.

But if you insist on blaming others, then you put the power of your life in their hands. What can you do then? Carry a sign? Hope the government will make things better for you?
 

ScienceRocks

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I must agree with Cain...If you're to stupid to work hard through school, college and get up in the morning and go to work then you deserve to be a poor piece of crap. Of course some people have problems that aren't there fault, but the world is a hard place. The world isn't fair.
 
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GHook93

GHook93

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Look at the protesters and most appear to be college level or recent college grads. Getting your first job out of college is tough. Then once you get it you usually get a shit job.

I will take my situation: I graduated undergrad right after 9/11. Literally in Jan. The job market took a huge hit back then. Getting interviews were tough and getting the job with small resume was even harder. I got a job for the infamous subprime lender, Ameriquest Mortgage (a company where I am sure the executives are going to hell someday). It was a tough gig. The base was $24K and the rest was commissions. I had to make 100+ cold calls a day and convince people to provide me their social security number over the phone and then peddle them a 2 yr ARM, at a rate and fees much higher than what the market was baring (including other subprime lenders). At 3 months you were a veteran, I lasted a year, but I then used the first job to get a second and better job. It was frustrating and that second job wasn't much more fun. I was able build a resume to where I got hired a harder, but higher paying and much more refreshing BtoB corp sales jobs. I have been here the last 6 years.

I look back at those first few years and didn't know how I would make. Now you have a new crop of young people flooding the market with astromical student loans (I was lucky enough that my father paid for my school) and it's even harder for them to get an interview.

I can understand their frustration, but this not the way to do it. No one is going to hire a lunatic screaming in the street!
 

waltky

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Kinda late don't ya think?...
:eusa_eh:
US banks sued over homes seizures
1 December 2011 - Agents used by banks to sort out foreclosures may have acted illegally
Massachusetts is suing five major banks alleging "illegal" and "deceptive" conduct in the way they seized homes during the financial crisis. Bank of America, JP Morgan, Wells Fargo, Citigroup, and GMAC must pay for the "harm" caused, the writ says. Martha Coakley, the state's attorney general, said the banks had no legal right to foreclose on "hundreds, if not thousands, of properties". The banks have expressed disappointment over the move. Massachusetts' action could potentially de-rail attempts to reach a US-wide settlement against banks accused of hastily calling in debts as the country's property bubble imploded.

Federal and state prosecutors have been negotiating a $25bn (£16bn) deal to resolve the issue over so-called "robo-signing", where banks employed people to sort out foreclosure documents without reviewing homeowners paperwork and circumstances. Ms Coakley said: "We have two clear goals with this lawsuit - one is to provide for real accountability for the role the banks have played in unlawful and illegal foreclosures, and secondly to provide for real and enforceable relief for the harm that the misconduct has caused." The complaint claims the banks violated Massachusetts law with "unlawful and deceptive" conduct in the foreclosure process, including unlawful foreclosures, false documentation, robo-signing, and deceptive practices related to loan modifications.

'It's taken too long'

A statement from the state attorney general's office said: "The single most important thing we can do to return to a healthy economy is to address this foreclosure crisis. "Our suit alleges that the banks have charted a destructive path by cutting corners and rushing to foreclose on homeowners without following the rule of law. Our action today seeks real accountability for the banks illegal behaviour and real relief for homeowners." In October 2010, major banks temporarily suspended foreclosures following revelations of fraudulent documents processed by banks. Ms Coakley said banks have had more than a year to "show accountability for this economic mess," and have failed to do so. "It's taken too long," she said.

Citigroup said it would defend its actions vigorously. Bank of America said it wanted a collaborative resolution to the issue. JP Morgan said in a statement that it was disappointed the lawsuit was filed while negotiations were ongoing about a broader settlement. GMAC said it was unhappy that Massachusetts "elected not to continue a more constructive path that could help borrowers in the state, but rather has chosen to use the court process." Wells Fargo said it disagreed with Ms Coakley that it had not kept a promise to modify loans. Citigroup said it had not yet reviewed the lawsuit, but the bank believed it had operated appropriately and in compliance with existing laws.

BBC News - US banks sued over homes seizures
 

bucs90

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Cain is right.

Blaming someone else only gets you cash in lawsuits.

Sadly, "blame others" has become one of America's favorite actions.
 

Avatar4321

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I agree with Cain. We should all take more responsibility for our actions.
 

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