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3,400 Border Patrol Agents on the Chopping Block

Founded85

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We now learn that budget sequestration — which will slash the federal budget by 9.4 percent in 2013 for discretionary defense appropriations and by 8.2 percent in 2013 for discretionary nondefense appropriations — is actually worse than thought. A law passed 14 months ago required another 1.9 percent reduction in 2013 if the Congressional Super Committee failed to come to agreement on a budget, which is exactly what happened.

More at cis.org/kephart/3400-border-patrol-agents-chopping-block
 

RoadVirus

<insert pithy title here>
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The Dumbos are willing to compromise our national security because they don't want to give up some of their precious entitlement programs.
 

spectrumc01

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The Dumbos are willing to compromise our national security because they don't want to give up some of their precious entitlement programs.
Why do we have to loose entitlements? why can't the government employees take a pay cut and downsize their pensions to the level of their constituents? Why not close our overseas embassies like the ones in the carribean, and the middle east. So many ways to cut and save rather than taking from the people, or sacrificing our national security. This is not an "either" / "or" proposition like the two parties keep telling us.
 

waltky

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Granny says, "Well dat's a goofy idea...

... we'll be even more overrun by Hispexicans...

... wonder who thought up dat dumb idea?
:eusa_eh:
 

waltky

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Mebbe it'll give immigration courts a chance to catch up...
:confused:
ICE: Fall in jail deportees tied to fewer migrants
Thu Nov 1, 2012 - Since taking over the job of screening inmates at the Maricopa County jails nearly a year ago, federal immigration officials have deported far fewer criminals than in previous years, when immigration screenings were performed by the Sheriff’s Office.
But U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say the drop reflects an overall decrease in illegal immigration, not a lack of commitment to conducting immigration screenings in the jail system. Sheriff Joe Arpaio and County Attorney Bill Montgomery also say they no longer have any major concerns with ICE’s handling of the program, in which agents check the legal status of every person booked into jail with the goal of deporting immigrants who commit serious crimes.

Arpaio and Montgomery had initially criticized the Department of Homeland Security, saying it wasn’t living up to its commitment to dedicate 50 ICE officers to conduct the immigration screenings at the jails after stripping the duties from the Sheriff’s Office. ICE has placed immigration holds on more than 4,936 immigrants booked into the jails since taking over immigration screenings last December, ICE officials said. So far, those holds have resulted in the removal of 926 criminal immigrants from Dec. 16, 2011, through Sept. 15 of this year, the agency said.

The number of deportations is markedly lower from previous years, when the screenings were being performed by the Sheriff’s Office as part of an agreement with ICE. ICE officials say the decrease is part of a trend that correlated with a significant decrease in illegal immigration overall in Arizona. Since hitting a high of 12,555 in fiscal 2008, the number of immigrants in the county deported through the program, known as 287(g), has been steadily decreasing, according to ICE statistics. In fiscal 2009, ICE deported 8,585 immigrants through the program, followed by 5,327 in 2010 and 3,092 in 2011.

In fiscal 2012, ICE deported 1,434 immigrants, including 508 from Oct. 1 until Dec. 16, when the immigration screenings were still being conducted by the Sheriff’s Office, and the 926 when ICE took over the screenings. Border Patrol apprehensions, a measure of illegal-immigrant traffic, totaled 123,285 in the Tucson Sector, which covers most of Arizona, in fiscal 2011, down from 378,239 in fiscal 2007. Statistics for fiscal 2012, which ended Sept. 30,have not been released yet.

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Report: Immigration courts falling behind despite more judges
11/01/12 - The Justice Department’s immigration courts have become less productive despite hiring more judges to handle deportation cases, according to a report released Thursday.
The report, issued by the DOJ’s inspector general (IG), found that the number of cases completed by the Executive Office of Immigration Review’s (EOIR) courts has decreased since 2006 despite the hiring of 27 additional judges The EOIR has 59 immigration courts and 238 judges who decide which immigrants should be removed from the United States after the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recommends deportation. In fiscal 2006, the EOIR’s 211 judges completed 324,040 immigration cases. But in fiscal 2010, the courts’ 238 judges were only able to complete 287,207 out of the 325,326 cases they received, or about 88 percent, according to the IG’s investigation.

The IG’s report found that the backlog in cases was mostly due to the courts’ focus on processing violent or dangerous illegal immigrants whom the DHS has prioritized for removal in its immigration enforcement efforts. The courts anticipate their caseloads will continue to increase as a result of expanded DHS enforcement actions, according to the report. As a result, many of the illegal immigrants referred to the courts who were not determined to be a violent or dangerous risk to the public, and had not been detained in the lead-up to their removal, have seen their cases significantly delayed. “For example, cases in our sample for non-detained aliens took on average 17 ½ months to adjudicate, with some cases taking more than five years to complete,” the investigation states.

The 59-page report, completed by DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz, made nine, mostly internal and managerial, recommendations for the immigration courts and their judges. The report reveals that in some instances, a court will categorize the case of an illegal immigrant as “complete” just because it has been transferred out of that particular court and into a different court within EOIR. Similarly, continuances are granted to cases more often than they should be, allowing them to carry on for extended periods of time, the report says.

Horowitz suggests that the courts keep separate records that track a case to completion, even if it goes through other courts before being finalized. And in order to reduce delays, judges in the EOIR should craft guidelines that dictate when it’s OK to grant a continuance in a case. The IG suggests that the misleading reporting standards make it difficult for DOJ to manage the courts’ resources. “[It] precludes the Department of Justice from accurately assessing how well these bodies are processing immigration cases and appeals, or identifying needed improvements,” the report states.

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