Who invented the christian victim card?

Discussion in 'Religion and Ethics' started by Dr.Drock, Jun 21, 2011.

  1. Dr.Drock
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    Dr.Drock Senior Member

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    Was it when the % of the population in america who claimed to be christian dropped from 80 to "only" 75?


    Was it when the christian representation in government dropped from 100 to 99%?



    It's a phenomena I don't understand. We live in a society of mostly christians, a society that almost promotes hating muslims and atheists, when did the overwhelming majority become victims? And of what?
     
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  2. LumpyPostage
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    They get a card? Now I'm jealous.
     
  3. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    Nero?
     
  4. manifold
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    manifold Diamond Member

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    Being persecuted is a foundation stone of Christianity.
    Kinda hard to think oneself humble when you run everything.
     
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    Its just part of the republican plan to fool people, much like their voter suppression efforts.
     
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    manifold Diamond Member

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    Misery, suffering, and persecution.

    You can't be a good religionist without them.
     
  9. Dr.Drock
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    Dr.Drock Senior Member

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    Lol that's just terrific
     
  10. emilynghiem
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    emilynghiem Constitutionalist Supporting Member

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    Dear Dr. D:
    I find people go through stages similar to the 5 stages of grief.
    Somewhere in there, they throw themselves "pity parties" where all blame is projected onto other people or groups, and this reinforces the victimhood or entitlement mentality.

    The saddest thing is victims do not really commiserate with each other at these pity parties.
    They end up competing to see whose pain is worse, and complaining "why you don't get it, don't patronize me, or why deny or discredit the victim." They don't even invite friends to these parties to share in the misery, but chase them away for trying to help.

    Instead, people are expected to go throw their own pity parties and multiply the misery separately!

    Just a stage people go through. I liken it to putting a thick scab over a wound, a huge emotional barrier to keep other people out. In order to isolate oneself in misery until the person is ready to heal at the next level. It is just some temporary protective mechanism, like denial. Any anger is used supposedly to mobilize or motivate change, but this anger too often becomes self-destructive where it defeats its own purpose. Still people go through this as part of the learning curve of being human, I guess. Like the terrible two's
    that turn into the tumultuous teens screaming "I hate you! You just want to control me! You're so unfair!"

    I prefer to bypass or speed up this step and go into interactive resolution, addressing conflicts as mutual
    respecting and responsible adults. Where people who realize that other people or groups are thinking the SAME THING and projecting blame and anger; then there is realization the pain and suffering is common.

    When there is mutual compassion and understanding that we are suffering together, then there is opportunity to reach out and solve problems together that are not the fault of one group more than another. This stuff has been repeating throughout human history. Our pains are unique, and no one's experience can be compared with someone else, it's all relative; and yet the common patterns are universal where we are all affected by this as a society and humanity as a whole. The division and fear of rejection/conflict/change/control is the enemy separating people from each other, and multiplying the problems while blocking the solutions.

    Sometimes people have to forgive first before they can see what is really happening.
    That we are not each other's enemy, but the division and conflict separating us is what is defeating us.

    But while they are in the anger/denial/projection phase, that is the hardest time to try to understand what forgiveness has anything to do with solving the problem. So they stay stuck for a while.

    If it wasn't necessary for the human process, I'm sure people wouldn't go through this.
    Somehow we all learn by experience, and we have emotional debts to work off our consciences, so we go through these things, these stages of grief and change.

    One of the books on forgiveness I read talked about moving from "victimhood" from seeing oneself as a "victim" of oppression or setbacks to seeing oneself as a "hero" for overcoming setbacks and not letting these obstacles obstruct one's purpose. That is a critical step in effective recovery from abuse or injustice, whether physically real or perceived as a psychological impact. But again, people cannot be forced to shift, it has to come from personal realization and everyone has a different path to understanding.

    Forgiveness is a big factor, but ironically, a lot of people don't understand but reject forgiveness which is hard to understand in advance. Most people end up having to forgive first, and then they understand after letting go how the unforgiveness was holding them back and causing them to be stuck in greater misery. It seems counterintuitive. It is easier understood in hindsight, after making that change in mindset.

    Just a social shift as we go through stages, from one extreme to the other.
    First separation of church and state/religious freedom meant to protect religious practice from imposition by the state. Now today it means to challenge any possible endorsement or allowance of prayer or religious reference by public institutions considered government.

    At some point we may realize that religious freedom covers both equally, so there would have to be consensus to prevent imposing bias one way or another. But currently, as long as we frame conflicts to be "either/or" "them/vs us" then we get this back and forth thing.
    Both sides projecting the blame on the other, claiming to be the victim of oppression.
    Just taking turns, that's all. Until there is understanding both sides are equally affected.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2011

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