We're Reaching the Demographic Tipping Point

Discussion in 'Politics' started by get_involved, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. get_involved
    Offline

    get_involved Gold Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2,036
    Thanks Received:
    423
    Trophy Points:
    130
    Ratings:
    +565
    "In 1980, Hispanics were only 2 percent of the population, and they tended to be educated, skilled workers who got married, raised their children in two-parent families and sent their kids to college before they, too, got married and had kids. (In that order.)

    That profile has nothing to do with recent Hispanic immigrants, who -- because of phony "family reunification" rules -- are the poorest of the world's poor.

    More than half of all babies born to Hispanic women today are illegitimate. As Heather MacDonald has shown, the birthrate of Hispanic women is twice that of the rest of the population, and their unwed birthrate is one and a half times that of blacks.

    That's a lot of government dependents coming down the pike."

    Ann Coulter Column: We're Reaching the Demographic Tipping Point | NewsBusters.org
     
  2. auditor0007
    Offline

    auditor0007 Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2008
    Messages:
    12,566
    Thanks Received:
    2,255
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Location:
    Toledo, OH
    Ratings:
    +3,218
    I've been saying for a long time that we had better invest as much as it takes into education for all minorities. If we don't educate them they will end up not being productive tax paying citizens. Our underclass will increase and it will result in us all having a lower standard of living. It doesn't matter if they become Democrats or Republicans, but they need to be educated and capable of truly contributing positively to society. The same holds true for poor whites, but we have a much bigger problem with Hispanics and Blacks because so many of them start out at such a disadvantage either due to living in bad conditions with parents who don't care enough about their future or with Hispanics, also having a language barrier to start with.
     
  3. Oldguy
    Offline

    Oldguy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,328
    Thanks Received:
    590
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Texas
    Ratings:
    +592
    Hmmmmm.

    If I recall correctly, I believe those "huddled masses, yearning to breathe free" who built this country into the great nation it is were the tired, the poor, the wretched refuse of other nations. Not the best and brightest, not the most wealthy, not the best educated, but the riffraff, the lowlifes, the undesirables, the ones nobody else wanted.

    Most of them did not speak English, came from a different culture and, in many cases, didn't even look like "us," but they were what mades us what we are today.
     
  4. Claudette
    Offline

    Claudette Gold Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    19,754
    Thanks Received:
    3,044
    Trophy Points:
    280
    Ratings:
    +7,784
    They were hard working folks trying to make a new life.

    I have no problem with those who come to this country LEGALLY. I have a big problem with ILLEGALS.

    Illegals come to work but they also have kids who are automatic US citizens. (Bullshit on that. We are the only country who follows that assinine law. A law that was put in to protect the childrendof the AA slaves) They then qualify for all the social services our country offers.

    Yup. Big difference between then and now.
     
  5. JoeB131
    Offline

    JoeB131 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    80,617
    Thanks Received:
    6,875
    Trophy Points:
    1,815
    Location:
    Chicago, Chicago, that Toddling Town
    Ratings:
    +15,091
    Ethnically, those "illegals" were on this continent longer than most white folks were.

    Two groups of people arguing over who has a better right to be here is like two fleas arguing over who owns the dog they are on.

    If you guys were really worried about stopping illegals, you'd go after the rich people who hire them because they dont want to pay an American a fair wage.
     
  6. JoeB131
    Offline

    JoeB131 Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    80,617
    Thanks Received:
    6,875
    Trophy Points:
    1,815
    Location:
    Chicago, Chicago, that Toddling Town
    Ratings:
    +15,091
    Here's the thing. The whole "Hispanic" is such an artificial designation to start with. It really doesn't apply to a "race", as blacks, native Americans and whites could all be counted as "Hispanic", depending where they came from and who their ancestors were.

    In a few generations, they stop speaking Spanish and more or less assimilate.
     
  7. martybegan
    Offline

    martybegan Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    29,495
    Thanks Received:
    4,017
    Trophy Points:
    290
    Ratings:
    +11,046
    The difference is that back in the 1900's the people who came here had to work, scrape by and do something with thier lives to better them, and to better the lives of thier children. Now, that incentive is gone, because since we take care of the poor's basic needs, a large percentage of them don't have to do anything. IN addition its become the mindset that the state is responsible for the kids of the poor (after all the state is paying for thier upkeep). Parents see school as daycare, not as a method of educating thier kids.

    And while we got the "undesireable people" it was only from a perspective of poverty. We also got some of the hardest working people, those people brave enough to spend all of thier holdings and take a 2-3 week journey to a new land with zero prospect of help right away, but unlimited prospects of prosperity if you work hard, and only if you work hard.

    Thats gone today for the most part.
     
  8. Oldguy
    Offline

    Oldguy Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2012
    Messages:
    4,328
    Thanks Received:
    590
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Texas
    Ratings:
    +592
    A LARGE percentage? What its that percentage and how do you know?

    Frankly, I don't think you've been around very many "illegals," have you?

    I'm guessing you don't have any kids in public school either.

    Really? I take it your not familiar with how the original colony of Georgia was settled, are you? Or, the number of indentured servants who were sent here? For another example, take a gander at how Australia was originally settled and then explain to me why that nation isn't prosperous today because of it (incidentally, criminals were transported here too.)

    Only in the minds of those who want to deny the facts.
     
  9. martybegan
    Offline

    martybegan Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    29,495
    Thanks Received:
    4,017
    Trophy Points:
    290
    Ratings:
    +11,046
    Actually I have friends who are teachers in public schools, and lots of parents could care less how thier kids are educated as long as they are taken care of for the 8 hours during the day.

    And with all your attempted fisking of my post, you missed the point entirely, in that when immigrants used to come here, there was no safety net, and they had to work. The same was for the indigenous poor. No work = no live. Now we have removed that to the point where someone can not only live off the government trough, they can do so quite comfortably, comfortoably to forstall a large amount of them from trying to better themselves, or more importantly thier children.
     
  10. beretta304
    Offline

    beretta304 BANNED

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2012
    Messages:
    8,664
    Thanks Received:
    73
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    A Saner Place
    Ratings:
    +73
    :cool:

    EyeWitnesstoHistory.com
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Immigration in the Early 1900s
    After the depression of the 1890s, immigration jumped from a low of 3.5 million in that decade to a high of 9 million in the first decade of the new century. Immigrants from Northern and Western Europe continued coming as they had for three centuries, but in decreasing numbers. After the 1880s, immigrants increasingly came from Eastern and Southern European countries, as well as Canada and Latin America. By 1910, Eastern and Southern Europeans made up 70 percent of the immigrants entering the country. After 1914, immigration dropped off because of the war, and later because of immigration restrictions imposed in the 1920s.

    The reasons these new immigrants made the journey to America differed little from those of their predecessors. Escaping religious, racial, and political persecution, or seeking relief from a lack of economic opportunity or famine still pushed many immigrants out of their homelands. Many were pulled here by contract labor agreements offered by recruiting agents, known as padrones to Italian and Greek laborers. Hungarians, Poles, Slovaks, Bohemians, and Italians flocked to the coal mines or steel mills, Greeks preferred the textile mills, Russian and Polish Jews worked the needle trades or pushcart markets of New York. Railroad companies advertised the availability of free or cheap farmland overseas in pamphlets distributed in many languages, bringing a handful of agricultural workers to western farmlands. But the vast majority of immigrants crowded into the growing cities, searching for their chance to make a better life for themselves.

    Immigrants entering the United States who could not afford first or second-class passage came through the processing center at Ellis Island, New York. Built in 1892, the center handled some 12 million European immigrants, herding thousands of them a day through the barn-like structure during the peak years for screening. Government inspectors asked a list of twenty-nine probing questions, such as: Have you money, relatives or a job in the United States? Are you a polygamist? An anarchist? Next, the doctors and nurses poked and prodded them, looking for signs of disease or debilitating handicaps. Usually immigrants were only detained 3 or 4 hours, and then free to leave. If they did not receive stamps of approval, and many did not because they were deemed criminals, strikebreakers, anarchists or carriers of disease, they were sent back to their place of origin at the expense of the shipping line.

    For the newcomers arriving without family, some solace could be found in the ethnic neighborhoods populated by their fellow countrymen. Here they could converse in their native tongue, practice their religion, and take part in cultural celebrations that helped ease the loneliness. Often, though, life for all was not easy. Most industries offered hazardous conditions and very low wages--lowered further after the padrone took out his share. Urban housing was overcrowded and unsanitary. Many found it very difficult to accept. An old Italian saying summed up the disillusionment felt by many: "I came to America because I heard the streets were paved with gold. When I got here, found out three things: First, the streets weren't paved with gold; second, they weren't paved at all: and third, I was expected to pave them." In spite of the difficulties, few gave up and returned home.
     

Share This Page