Warmer Water GOOD for Corals it seems.

Discussion in 'Environment' started by westwall, Feb 3, 2012.

  1. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Ruh Rohhhh, the AGW cultists didn't know about this I bet. It seems that the last 110 years of warmer waters off of the coast of Australia has been good for coral reef growth.
    Yet ANOTHER assertion cast into doubt. Will they ever get something right? I doubt it...

    The second link is to the Science abstract.......ruh rohhhhhh!

    "A GOVERNMENT-RUN research body has found in an extensive study of corals spanning more than 1000km of Australia's coastline that the past 110 years of ocean warming has been good for their growth.

    The findings undermine blanket predictions that global warming will devastate coral reefs, and add to a growing body of evidence showing corals are more resilient than previously thought, up to a certain point.

    The study by the commonwealth-funded Australian Institute of Marine Science, peer-reviewed findings of which are published in the leading journal Science today, examined 27 samples from six locations from the West Australian coast off Geraldton to offshore from Darwin.

    At each site, scientists took cores from massive porites corals - similar to a biopsy in humans - and counted back to record their age in much the same way tree rings are counted. Although some cores extended back to the 18th century, they focused on the period from 1900 to 2010.

    The researchers found that, contrary to their expectations, warmer waters had not negatively affected coral growth. Quite the opposite, in fact: for their southern samples, where ocean temperatures are the coolest but have warmed the most, coral growth increased most significantly over the past 110 years. For their northern samples, where waters are the warmest and have changed the least, coral growth still increased, but not by as much.

    "Those reefs have actually been able to take advantage of the warmer conditions," said Janice Lough, a senior AIMS research scientist and one of the study's authors.

    Maria Byrne, a professor of marine biology at Sydney University, said after reading the paper that its findings "made perfect sense". "Temperature rules metabolism, so it's a no-brainer that if you get more temperature you will get more metabolism."


    Cookies must be enabled | The Australian

    Growth of Western Australian Corals in the Anthropocene
     
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  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    So, differant corals in differant locations are reacting differantly to the warming.

    Growth of Western Australian Corals in the Anthropocene

    Anthropogenic increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide lead to warmer sea surface temperatures and altered ocean chemistry. Experimental evidence suggests that coral calcification decreases as aragonite saturation drops but increases as temperatures rise toward thresholds optimal for coral growth. In situ studies have documented alarming recent declines in calcification rates on several tropical coral reef ecosystems. We show there is no widespread pattern of consistent decline in calcification rates of massive Porites during the 20th century on reefs spanning an 11° latitudinal range in the southeast Indian Ocean off Western Australia. Increasing calcification rates on the high-latitude reefs contrast with the downward trajectory reported for corals on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef and provide additional evidence that recent changes in coral calcification are responses to temperature rather than ocean acidification.
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Cookies must be enabled | The Australian

    The key question is how warm the water can get before the positive effects are reversed.

    Lab studies have typically measured the effect of short-term, rapid changes in temperature and water chemistry; these mimic, for example, coral-bleaching events that are known to be devastating. Much harder to measure are the long-term effects of gradual warming, such as is caused by climate change.

    A recent paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, reported in The Australian, showed Zooxanthellae - the symbiotic organisms that live inside corals - can adapt much better to warming water than was previously thought. It is also known corals can, to a degree, change their Zooxanthellae with changing conditions.

    Professor Byrne said the eggs of marine organisms laid in warmer water would pass that temperature tolerance on to the embryo, allowing ecosystems to evolve.

    One of her recent papers, published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, showed sea cucumbers helped corals survive ocean acidification better.

    Warming temperatures make coral bleaching more likely.
     
  4. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    Boy, what a good question. It seems corals bleach even more rapidly due to cold but that's another issue eh?:lol::lol:

    28 January 2010 Cold snap killed Florida coral [Keyword: bleaching ]
    A cold snap earlier this month killed or bleached significant amounts of coral in the waters off South Florida and the Florida Keys, according to an analysis this week by Nature Conservancy scientists.

    “About 50 to 70 percent of the entire coral reef is dead in the upper Keys,” said Meaghan Johnson, marine science coordinator with the Nature Conservancy.

    The culprit was the 12 consecutive days of extremely cold weather from Jan. 2-14 in Florida, which included a near-record cold air temperature of 42 degrees in Key West on Jan. 11. Johnson said the water temperatures in some parts of the Keys during that time plummeted into the frigid upper 40s and lower 50s, far below typical lows of the upper 60s and lower 70s.

    Although coral bleaching and death is most frequently associated with unusually warm water temperatures, coral also can’t withstand water temperatures below 60 degrees. Below that temperature, coral bleaching occurs when the coral undergoes stress and loses its symbiotic algae. Prolonged cold stress can result in coral death.



    Cold snap killed Florida coral : Marine and Ocean Conservation News from Earthdive
     
  5. Old Rocks
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    Weather swings that are wider and wilder, with an overall warming trend.
     
  6. Old Rocks
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    Scientists Report One of the Worst Coral Bleaching Events on Record in Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean | WWF Climate Blog

    WWF Climate Blog


    Home » Blogs » Nick Sundt's blog

    Scientists Report One of the Worst Coral Bleaching Events on Record in Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean







    Published by Nick Sundt on Wed, 10/20/2010 - 08:53


    The Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies said in press release yesterday (Worst coral death strikes at SE Asia, 19 October 2010) that "[m]any reefs are dead or dying across the Indian Ocean and into the Coral Triangle following a bleaching event that extends from the Seychelles in the west to Sulawesi and the Philippines in the east and include reefs in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and many sites in western and eastern Indonesia."

    “It is certainly the worst coral die-off we have seen since 1998. It may prove to be the worst such event known to science,” says Dr Andrew Baird of the ARC Centre.

    The Coral Triangle -- bordered by Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines -- is one of WWF's priority areas. It covers just one percent of the Earth’s surface, but is home to fully 30 percent of the world’s coral reefs, 76 percent of reef-building coral species and more than 35 percent of coral reef fish species. It also serves as vital spawning grounds for other economically important fish such as tuna.
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Regional sea temperature rise and coral bleaching event in Western Caribbean

    Regional Sea Temperature Rise and Coral Bleaching Event in Western Caribbean


    ScienceDaily (Oct. 12, 2010) — The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Bocas del Toro Research Station and Galeta Point Marine Laboratory are reporting an anomalous sea temperature rise and a major coral bleaching event in the western Caribbean.


    Although the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued an advisory in July announcing above-average sea surface temperatures in the wider Caribbean region, there had been no clear indication of increased sea temperatures in Panama and the western Caribbean until late August-early September.

    Scientists and local dive operators first noticed coral bleaching in the waters surrounding Isla Colon in Panama's Bocas del Toro province in July. Smithsonian staff scientist Nancy Knowlton and colleagues documented an extensive bleaching event in late September. Station personnel recorded an extreme sea water temperature of 32 degrees C. Normal temperatures at this time of year are closer to 28 degrees C. This warming event currently affects the entire Caribbean coast of Panama from Kuna-Yala to Bocas del Toro and has also been reported at sites in Costa Rica.
     
  8. westwall
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    westwall USMB Mod Staff Member Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

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    :lol::lol::lol: Stung ya didn't I! It's easy to tell, you allways post a whole bunch of drivel trying to bury the post you don't like!:lol::lol:


    Boy, what a good question. It seems corals bleach even more rapidly due to cold but that's another issue eh?

    I'll post it again so that others can see it.



    "28 January 2010 Cold snap killed Florida coral [Keyword: bleaching ]
    A cold snap earlier this month killed or bleached significant amounts of coral in the waters off South Florida and the Florida Keys, according to an analysis this week by Nature Conservancy scientists.

    “About 50 to 70 percent of the entire coral reef is dead in the upper Keys,” said Meaghan Johnson, marine science coordinator with the Nature Conservancy.

    The culprit was the 12 consecutive days of extremely cold weather from Jan. 2-14 in Florida, which included a near-record cold air temperature of 42 degrees in Key West on Jan. 11. Johnson said the water temperatures in some parts of the Keys during that time plummeted into the frigid upper 40s and lower 50s, far below typical lows of the upper 60s and lower 70s.

    Although coral bleaching and death is most frequently associated with unusually warm water temperatures, coral also can’t withstand water temperatures below 60 degrees. Below that temperature, coral bleaching occurs when the coral undergoes stress and loses its symbiotic algae. Prolonged cold stress can result in coral death.


    http://www.earthdive.com/site/news/newsdetail.asp?id=3184
     
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  9. Old Rocks
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    Hmmm...... so we had two coral bleaching events in the Western Carribean in 2010. One due to unusual cold, one due to unusual heat. But 2010 went down as equal in warming to 1998, in spite of the cold snaps in North America in that year. Once again, 'Weather swings that are wider and wilder, with an overall warming'.
     
  10. bripat9643
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    There's no evidence of "weather swings" that are wilder and wilder. I've been watching weatherman talk about "record temperatures" ever since I was a kid. The record depends on how long they've been keeping track. There's also the fact of urban heat islands.
     

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