Voter suppression continues in Florida

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Chris, May 29, 2011.

  1. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    According to a new Quinnipiac University poll of Florida voters, Rick Scott is now one of the country’s most unpopular governors, a dubious feat after only four months in office.

    It’s bad news for Republican Party bosses, but all is not lost. Scott recently signed a new election bill that is callously designed to suppress voter turnout, making it harder for many disgruntled Floridians to cast a valid ballot in 2012.

    Democrats outnumber Republicans in the state, so GOP leaders are desperate to find ways to keep certain people away from the polls. One of the Legislature’s top priorities was to change the voting rules to avoid a repeat of 2008, when Barack Obama won the state’s 27 electoral votes on his way to the presidency.

    Obama benefited from early-voting days, which proved popular among minorities, college students and retirees. Republican officials became incensed during the election when then-Gov. Charlie Crist — one of their own — decided to extend polling hours to accommodate the long lines.

    The nerve of that guy, making it easier for common citizens to vote!

    Determined not to let this whole democracy thing get out of hand, the GOP-held Legislature crafted a bill that reduces the number of early voting days from 15 to eight, and requires some voters who have moved to cast provisional ballots, a deliberate inconvenience aimed at students.

    Historically, provisional ballots are counted at a much lower rate than regular ones, meaning many young voters won’t get heard — exactly what Scott and the Republican leadership want.

    The new bill also throws out a rule that had been in effect for 40 years allowing Floridians to update their legal addresses when they arrive to vote. Now you can only do that if you moved within the same county.

    GOP won’t let democracy get out of hand - Carl Hiaasen - MiamiHerald.com
     
  2. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Gold Member

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    Care to point out how establishing 8 days to vote somehow Suppresses anyone's right to vote? Care to explain how requiring people not voting in their own district to explain why is suppressing votes? Care to explain how ALLOWING people to vote in the wrong district with a provisional Ballot subject to verification of the right to vote is somehow suppressing someone's right to vote?
     
  3. Luissa
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    Luissa Annoying Customer Supporting Member

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    This guy is really for small government.
     
  4. Czarcasm
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    Czarcasm Rookie

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    The OP does have a point. I mean 9 out 10 dead people do vote Democrat. Musn't suppress that base.
     
  5. Care4all
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    Care4all Warrior Princess Supporting Member

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    from the article

    that's suppressing one man, one vote isn't it?
     
  6. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    Weekly Voter ID Update: WI and TN disenfranchise voters, TX and MO close at their heels - Campus Progress

    Wisconsin: Governor Scott Walker (R) signed Wisconsin’s voter suppression bill into law Wednesday. Among other things, the bill:

    •Changes Wisconsin’s residency requirement from 10 days to 28 days before an election (effective immediately – impacting upcoming special and recall elections);
    • Shortens the early (absentee by mail or in-person) voting periods (effective immediately – impacting upcoming special and recall elections);
    •Enacts a strict photo ID requirement starting with the 2012 Primary election. Student IDs will be accepted if they contain the student’s photo, signature, and an expiration date no later than 2 years after the date of the election. Student IDs in WI do not currently meet these requirements, so expensive overhauls will have to be undertaken for students to be able to use their college/university ID cards as voter ID;
    •Even though ID isn’t required until 2012, poll workers will have to ask voters for ID at the polling place during upcoming elections – a “trial run” sure to cause widespread confusion and have a chilling effect on participation;
    •College student voters who need to prove their residency and are using their student ID must also provide a fee payment receipt from their school dated no more than 9 months prior to the election or must appear on a certified list of on-campus students provided by their university or college to the clerk.

    Tennessee: A photo ID bill was passed and sent to the Governor Bill Haslam (R) for signature on Monday. On Monday Governor Haslam also signed into law a proof of citizenship requirement for voter registration, effective January 1, 2012.

    Texas: Governor Rick Perry (R) has until Monday to sign, veto, or let pass without signature the photo ID bill passed by the legislature last week. His staff is reportedly reviewing it. But since Perry declared voter photo ID an emergency issue this legislative session, there is little doubt he will sign. Due to its history of discrimination, Texas is another state that must receive federal approval for changes to its voting laws, so the bill will still need to be approved by the U.S. Department of Justice or the D.C. federal district court before it can be implemented.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2011
  7. Chris
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    Chris Gold Member

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    In Wisconsin a study showed the following about those without state-issued driver’s license and who would need to obtain photo identification under the Wisconsin voter ID bill:

    • Over 178,000 elderly Wisconsinites.

    • 17 percent of white men and women.

    • 55 percent of African-American men and 49 percent of African-American women.

    • 46 percent of Hispanic men and 59 percent of Hispanic women.

    • 78 percent of African-American men age 18-24 and 66 percent of African-American women age 18-24.

    Additional statistics about Wisconsin lack of accessible Division of Motor Vehicles offices compared to Indiana:

    • 26 percent of Wisconsin’s 91 DMVs are open one day a month or less, while none of Indiana’s are open less than 100 days a year and nearly all are open over 250 days a year.

    • Wisconsin has only one DMV with weekend hours, while Indiana has 124 offices with weekend hours.

    • Three Wisconsin counties have no DMVs, no Indiana county is without a DMV.

    • Over half of Wisconsin’s 91 DMVs are open on a part-time basis, while Indiana provides full-time DMVs in every county.

    Republican claims of widespread voter irregularity have long been debunked. After a two-year investigation, Republican Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen has found only 11 potentially improper votes cast out of nearly 3 million votes in 2008. The former Wisconsin U.S. attorney under George W. Bush, Steve Biskupic, concluded after a similar investigation that there was no widespread voter fraud.

    Scot Ross: Why voter ID bill may be unconstitutional
     
  8. RetiredGySgt
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    RetiredGySgt Gold Member

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    The law requires they be verified. Each State is different. They shouldn't be allowed to vote at all if in the wrong district or they did not register where they live.
     
  9. RetiredGySgt
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    Requiring ID is NOT voter suppression. It is prudent and should have always been required once ID was so easily obtained. It is the Governments JOB to ensure only properly registered CITIZENS are voting.
     
  10. The Rabbi
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    The Rabbi Gold Member

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    Actually more like one man three votes. Provisional ballots if valid get counted just like regulat ballots. They are examined for irregularities which is why they wouldn't be.
     

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