Veteran Gets US Army Medal of Honor 55 Years Later

Discussion in 'Military' started by pegwinn, Sep 24, 2005.

  1. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    Absofreakinlutley wonderful. There are no words to describe it. I hope the alleged Sergeant is getting the beat down if true.

    Veteran Gets US Army Medal of Honor 55 Years Later

    Friday, September 23, 2005


    LOS ANGELES — A concentration camp survivor who joined the U.S. Army out of gratitude, fought in Korea and spent 2 1/2 years in a Chinese prisoner of war camp was awarded a Medal of Honor (search) on Friday, 55 years after his heroism.

    President Bush gave the nation's highest military honor to Hungarian-born Tibor Rubin (search), 76, in the White House East Room. The medal recognizes him for overcoming dangers as an infantryman, trying to save fellow soldiers in battle and as a prisoner of war, even as he faced prejudice because he was Jewish and a foreigner.

    "By repeatedly risking his own life to save others, Cpl. Rubin exemplified the highest ideals of military service and fulfilled a pledge to give something back to the country that had given him his freedom," Bush said.

    The Hungarian-born Rubin, of Garden Grove, Calif., stood at Bush's side with his head slightly bowed and his hands clasped behind his back as the president extolled him, then fastened the gold medal around his neck.

    "It's a wonderful, beautiful country. We are all very lucky," Rubin told reporters later.

    When Rubin was just 13, he and his family were rounded up by the Nazis and taken to the Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria. His parents and sister died at the hands of the Nazis but Rubin survived for 14 months. He was liberated by American GIs and vowed to join the U.S. Army if he ever made it to America.

    After he came to this country and enlisted, he was quickly sent to Korea. There, Rubin's actions during battle and as a prisoner of war went beyond bravery to heroism, as Bush described them.

    Assigned to defend a hill, Rubin single-handedly held off the enemy for 24 hours, inflicting casualties and allowing his own unit to withdraw safely. Later he was captured by the Chinese. During captivity, he risked his life to steal food for fellow prisoners, give them medical help and keep their morale up. He refused an offer from his captors to return to communist Hungary.

    "Those who served with Ted speak of him as a soldier who gladly risked his own life for others," Bush said.

    His acts of compassion came even though he suffered prejudice. The Army says Rubin's fellow soldiers and commanding officers recommended him for the Medal of Honor three times before, but the paperwork was not submitted because a member of his chain of command was believed to have discriminated against him.

    Rubin has refused to say anything negative about the Army and his long wait for the Medal of Honor. But in affidavits filed in support of Rubin's nomination, fellow soldiers said their sergeant was an anti-Semite who gave Rubin dangerous assignments in hopes of getting him killed.

    In 1988, the Jewish War Veterans of the United States urged Congress to recognize Rubin's efforts.

    More than 3,400 Medals of Honor have been awarded since the decoration was created in 1861.

    SOURCE
     
  2. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    This was a Jew. In the history section we find the most decorated battalion in WWII was the Japanese. In any case, immigrants, those that are here within the rules set forth at the time, are amongst are most important treasures.
     
  3. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    I'd rep if I could, seems I've given out 'too much.'
     
  4. Annie
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    Annie Diamond Member

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    This is cool too, though I think I stole it from somebody;

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2005/09/20050923-2.html#
     
  5. pegwinn
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    pegwinn Top of the Food Chain

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    Kathi, thanks for the Presidential remarks. They are awesome. On another board someone questioned whether the soldier deserved the medal and asked if it "cheapened" the award.

    So to forstall anyones question, here is the citation:

    source

    Citation
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:

    Corporal Tibor Rubin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period from July 23, 1950, to April 20, 1953, while serving as a rifleman with Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in the Republic of Korea. While his unit was retreating to the Pusan Perimeter, Corporal Rubin was assigned to stay behind to keep open the vital Taegu-Pusan Road link used by his withdrawing unit. During the ensuing battle, overwhelming numbers of North Korean troops assaulted a hill defended solely by Corporal Rubin. He inflicted a staggering number of casualties on the attacking force during his personal 24-hour battle, single-handedly slowing the enemy advance and allowing the 8th Cavalry Regiment to complete its withdrawal successfully. Following the breakout from the Pusan Perimeter, the 8 th Cavalry Regiment proceeded northward and advanced into North Korea. During the advance, he helped capture several hundred North Korean soldiers. On October 30, 1950, Chinese forces attacked his unit at Unsan, North Korea, during a massive nighttime assault. That night and throughout the next day, he manned a .30 caliber machine gun at the south end of the unit's line after three previous gunners became casualties. He continued to man his machine gun until his ammunition was exhausted. His determined stand slowed the pace of the enemy advance in his sector, permitting the remnants of his unit to retreat southward. As the battle raged, Corporal Rubin was severely wounded and captured by the Chinese. Choosing to remain in the prison camp despite offers from the Chinese to return him to his native Hungary, Corporal Rubin disregarded his own personal safety and immediately began sneaking out of the camp at night in search of food for his comrades. Breaking into enemy food storehouses and gardens, he risked certain torture or death if caught. Corporal Rubin provided not only food to the starving Soldiers, but also desperately needed medical care and moral support for the sick and wounded of the POW camp. His brave, selfless efforts were directly attributed to saving the lives of as many as forty of his fellow prisoners. Corporal Rubin's gallant actions in close contact with the enemy and unyielding courage and bravery while a prisoner of war are in the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
     
  6. NATO AIR
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    NATO AIR Senior Member

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    As we are seeing in the WOT, where we have Mexicans getting the navy cross, the medal of honor, etc etc. This is part of our lifeblood, of our heritage.
     

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