To write or not to write....I just read a beautiful article about William Shakespeare

Discussion in 'Writing' started by JW Frogen, Mar 14, 2010.

  1. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    I just read a beautiful article about William Shakespeare in the Guardian. It is a dispute about whether he wrote the plays but the author has no doubt he did.

    Some times a human is so complex few believe they really exist as they do.

    I suppose every last one of us has this problem at one time or another?

    Every last one of us can be full of wonder a grace, but can we always convince the world at large?

    Who really wrote Shakespeare? | Culture | The Observer

    I love this quote.

    "He is the greatest humanist who ever lived. No one understands forgiveness like Shakespeare."

    Now that is a life well lived.
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2010
  2. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    The article also makes the claim he was a big drinker.

    Not that is a life lived, well, in a Tempest rather than a tea cup.
     
  3. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    sorry the article is based on a falsehood...shakespeare was barely literate...must less capable of writing the sonnets etc....
     
  4. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    I love this kind of article. I am not really into Shakes as much as others I know. I've known a few teachers/pedants who lived and breathed Shakespeare. I tried, but...

    One thing thing that always amused me was this so called debate about the identity of the man from Stratford. A debate usually involves two reasonable and rational sides.

    Let the man below speak...

    :lol:

    thank you for this thread.
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  5. random3434
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    random3434 Senior Member

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    I've always heard it was a woman who was "Shakespeare" and of course back then, women weren't allowed to write, so the ghost writer WS "fronted" her.
     
  6. strollingbones
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    strollingbones Diamond Member

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    that woman would have been his wife....ann hathway.....

    i have often wondered if shakes is as great as we make him out to be...but then...when i read the plays....
     
  7. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    The thing I love most about Shakespeare is he has no agenda, he can sympathise with every last one of his characters. Often he makes his “villains” the wittiest person in the play. (Richard III). This is a man who has played many parts, and lived them.

    My view is that that the most beloved character in Shakespeare is Falstaff, because Falstaff was the closest character to Shakespeare. A drunk, womanizer, wit and adventurer; a man who was cynical of power and ambition.

    Still as a womanizer he had known enough about women to play the fool in the Merry Wives of Winsor. They get the best of him. Well, as they should. He had lived that, he had to be that fool.

    What man has not?

    Yet Falstaff is the inebriated frontal lobe of the history plays. He is in those plays a drunk Socrates. Outside the political box, culture, herd.

    But in Henry V Falstaff dies at second hand account, a pathetic death, babbling of green fields.

    I suspect Shakespeare was warning himself. He will not eulougize himself, he wants to be true to his life.

    Shakespeare may have been the most self aware human of all.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2010
  8. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    hahaha, Shakes had a political agenda.

    :lol:

    The Crown and other elites were not happy, but the agenda was disguised as art.

    :eusa_whistle:
     
  9. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    While it is true Shakespeare had the power to mock power obliquely he could also praise and please power. For instance Henry V is almost a hymn to militaristic adventure for it's own sake and Queen Elizabeth loved Falstaff so she commissioned a play where he is a fooled and a fool in love.

    There is no political agenda in Shakespeare that is not contricticted by Shakespeare.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2010
  10. JW Frogen
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    JW Frogen Gold Member

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    "Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more: it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing."
     

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