The Proper Relationship of Church and State in America

Discussion in 'Politics' started by koshergrl, Feb 24, 2012.

  1. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    The United States, contrary to popular belief, was not founded upon a desire for religious freedom. Our original European inhabitants came here to escape religious persecution, but when our founding fathers determined to rebel against the crown more than a hundred years later, it was not for religious purposes they did so. They acted against tyranny, rather. Specifically they chafed under strenuous taxation and continued rape of American resources, natural and monetary, by the Crown.

    Once they embarked upon this path, they began to take into consideration the role that religion would play in their newly established government. Moved by the persecution of Baptists, Jefferson ultimately wrote “…no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever…nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion, and that the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities.” (Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, 1786.)

    Jefferson made it clear that while the government has no right to establish religion or force men to worship, neither does it have the right to silence or penalize men for their faith. Tyranny, according to Jefferson, is when the government forces men to support an ideology they do not agree with, or prevents them from advancing civilly based upon their faith.
    This is the proper relationship of church and state.

    Reference:

    Virginia Historical Society. Virginia Statue for Religious Freedom (Jan. 16, 1786) From Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (annotated transcript) - Becoming Americans   |   The Story of Virginia, An American Experience on February
     
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  2. occupied
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    occupied Gold Member

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    The proper relationship should be that they are strangers to one another neither informing the other.
     
  3. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    No, that's not what Jefferson and the founding fathers thought at all.

    You are the biggest loser. But thanks for playing.
     
  4. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    I think you missed this part:

    "nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief; but that all men shall be free to profess"

    Politicians were not excluded. As you can tell from this: "the same shall in no wise diminish, enlarge, or affect their civil capacities."
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2012
  5. occupied
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    occupied Gold Member

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    Don't really care what they thought on this issue, The religious landscape of the 18th century bears little resemblance to today. The wall of separation should be a wall, not a ramp where the government is powerless to fight back against a growing theocracy movement.
     
  6. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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  7. bodecea
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    bodecea Diamond Member

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    I am curious as to who you think, politician or otherwise, is not free to profess in this country.
     
  8. ScreamingEagle
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    ScreamingEagle Gold Member

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    does "free" mean without viscious attack in the "free" press........? :doubt:
     
  9. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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    Ah, another poster who seems incapable of just reading the words that are spoken and addressing the topic at hand.

    This is about the proper relationship. I didn't say anyone is not free to profess their faith in this country.

    Though if anti-Christian bigots had their way of course they would not be able to.

    But back to the actual topic:

    "...presidents from Washington to Madison played a delicate game of brinksmanship. All of them strove to keep religion from becoming the fodder for controversy by affirming that expressions of spirituality had a legitimate place in the public square while also upholding what they regarded as a due separation between church and state."

    The Separation of Church and State from the American Revolution to the Early Republic, Divining America, TeacherServe®, National Humanities Center
     
  10. koshergrl
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    koshergrl Diamond Member

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