Students in college for more than 6 years to potentially lose Pell grant

Discussion in 'Education' started by chanel, Dec 17, 2011.

  1. chanel
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    chanel Senior Member

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    Students in college for more than 6 years to potentially lose Pell grant - The Washington Post

    Nine years to finish college?
     
  2. old navy
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    old navy <<< Action Figures

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    So far, college has been the best 6 years of my son's life. Actually he bounced around to five different schools chasing the sports dream and did not qualify for Pell grants. He finally graduated and is now a Marine officer.

    Grants and handouts should not last forever. People should be given an appropriate amount of time while maintaining satisfactory academic performance. After that, you're outta here.
     
  3. WorldWatcher
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    WorldWatcher Gold Member

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    >

    I think a 6-year limit is a perfectly reasonable expectation for the receipt of free money. A Bachelors is often referred to as a 4-year degree but it is not that uncommon for students to need more than 4-years. Sometimes the requirements of the school in a degree field are more than 120 Semester hours (8 Semesters @ 15-hours each) because of course requirements. In addition there are those who try to decrease the overall cost of a college education by doing 2-years at a Community College and the final 2-years at a University and the University does not accept all the transferred classes. Then of course you have the professional students who keep changing majors, which extends time in school, and want taxpayers to pay for the extended time.

    No problem with the reduced time limit and/or academic requirements to continue to receive the grant.


    (The timing thing is what is going on with our son who is currently a "Senior" at a University (Community College route). Of course he doesn't get Pell Grants and works part-time in Information Technology support. We don't qualify for Pell Grants and have rejected student loans. He goes to school full time, works part time, and will graduate with no education dept.)


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  4. chanel
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    chanel Senior Member

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    Congrats to you and your son. I am pleased with this common sense entitlement cut. My hunch is that many of these "9 yearers" have no intention of getting a degree and may be "no show students" wasting taxpayer money. Kudos to our lawmakers for finally addressing this.
     
  5. Katzndogz
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    Katzndogz Gold Member

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    After ten years in college, I laid the law down to my son. He finished or quit and got a job. Did I mention he was 32 by this time. He was forced to quit and get a job. He eventually finished as a part time student. To this day he resents me for depriving him of an education. I can't care. I know that if he was allowed to continue, he would be in college to this very day.
     
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  6. WorldWatcher
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    WorldWatcher Gold Member

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    Thanks for the Congrats.

    Actually we have two college students. Our son as described and our daughter who is currently a junior at a different school about 4-hours away. We're very proud of both of them. As I said hour son will graduate debt free, our daughter will have some debt. She worked her ass off as a freshman (instead of going the party route, thank heaven) and earned a full tuition ROTC scholarship. She will pay back her "loan" with active duty after she graduates. We're a military family and she looking at it as the first step in a military career.



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  7. chanel
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    chanel Senior Member

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    Oh my. My son is 21 and I have no idea when he will graduate. He transferred schools, took a semester off, and changed his major. I put in our family Christmas letter that he was a "4th year freshman" He didn't think that was funny. Perhaps he is right. Lol
     
  8. Katzndogz
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    Katzndogz Gold Member

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    Yeah, that was my son's excuse after ten years. He kept changing his major.
     
  9. WorldWatcher
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    When our kids were still in High School we sat down with each separeately and had "The Conversation"! (No not that conversation, we'd already had that, this one was about funding college.)

    We did high level overview of family financials as it pertained to loans and grants, the point was we were in that range where funding college would be painful since we earned to much to qualify for "free money" yet we couldn't afford to give them a free ride (which I wouldn't do anyway).

    So we laid down some rules if the kids wanted us to help with college:

    1. They would be required to work (and/or contribute) to their own education. No if's, ands, or buts apply.

    2. The purpose of a college education is prepare them for a employment post-college, as such their major MUST provide a high degree of employability after graduation. We would contibute nothing, zero, nadda, zip, zilch toward a degree that was not. If they wanted a degree in "Psychology", "Sociology", medieval English Literature, etc. - then they would be on their own. We wanted them to pursue a career they like, but that was a secondary consideration to becoming independent as an adult.​



    Our daughter degree major is Mathematics, which is a highly desirable area desired by the military and which provides high employability if the military doesn't work out as a Math Teacher (Math typically being a critical shortage area for teachers). Her Plan A is a military career, Plan B is teaching math (High School in the short term, eventually getting her post-graduate degrees and teaching at a University). Our son degree major is IT/Business, and as I said he currently works part time in IT. He's doing very well at work and there have been some indications that they will take his job full time once he graduates. He and some technical buddies are also exploring their ability to start their own business in the IT field once they all finish school.


    Mom and I were sweating bullets about having two children in college at the same time. I'm very proud to say that our kids have come through with their part of the bargin with flying colors and I think in the process they have gained a deep understanding of the value of an education because it hasn't been a free ride. They've learned a lot from the experience way beyond simply what is going on in the classroom.



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    Last edited: Dec 17, 2011
  10. chanel
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    chanel Senior Member

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    We have two in school at the same time also. The younger one is in a 5 year engineering program and loves it. (Straight A's first semester) The older one will hopefully be done in 5 years as well. He loves his major, but I'm fearful that it's not too marketable. He wants to be a comedy writer. If he switches majors or wants to go to grad school, he'll be on his own financially. We gave them both "x" amount of money and when that's gone - we're done.
     

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what if you go past 6 years to graduate on the pell grants