someofobamacareisprettygood

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Greenbeard, May 19, 2012.

  1. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    Republicans are in a bit of pickle.

    Two years ago they popularized the phrase "repeal-and-replace" to intimate that they had some alternative approach to health care reform they wanted to put in place. And in 2009 they sort of did, tepid and unimpressive as it was. And back then they were more than happy to incorporate elements of the ACA that they (and the public) liked--e.g. eliminating annual and lifetime caps on insurance plans, or letting 26-year-olds stay on their parents' insurance--into their replacement suggestion.

    And why shouldn't they? The ACA seized the middle ground and moved on reforms that the right claimed had been its health priorities for years: it provided encouragement for high-deductible plans, put brakes on new state benefit mandates, created mechanisms for allowing insurers to bypass individual state certification processes and sell across state lines, facilitated small business pools, and offered the first federal attention to malpractice reform.

    But that was 2009-10 and this is 2012. The most vocal parts of the Republican party are the most radical and they're insistent that retaining or replicating any single piece of the ACA is unacceptable because that would in some way validate the ACA (and Obama--yuck!). And that's backing them into a bit of a corner.

    A Politico article yesterday--appropriately titled "Right infighting over health care"--captured some of this confusion:

    Tensions ran high on the ACA-destruction-dedicated Google email group the Republicans have dubbed The Repeal Coalition.
    Now that would be a listserv we can believe in.

    Boehner then rushed in front of a camera to pander to the hardliners:
    But by abandoning every single piece of the ACA the Republicans aren't just ditching the big-ticket items I mentioned above, they're also abandoning numerous provisions originally pitched in Republican health care bills over the last 3 years (indeed, the language from those Republican bills was explicitly copied and pasted into the ACA on some occasions), as well as pieces that were new in the ACA but already endorsed by the Republican party. Some examples:

    • Popular pieces of the ACA that were retained in the original Republican repeal-and-replace legislation last session (legislation that never came back once the Republicans got a majority in the House):
      • Extension of coverage for dependents through age 26
      • High-risk pools
      • Elimination of annual or lifetime benefit caps
      • Prohibiting rescissions
      • Further administrative simplification of electronic health transactions
    • The tort reform provisions of Mike Enzi's reform bill (later adapted by Paul Ryan in his bill)
    • The state-based exchanges that set benefit standards and don't allow plans to turn away applicants due to pre-existing conditions that Paul Ryan, Tom Coburn, Richard Burr, and Devin Nunes were so proud of when they introduced them
    • The "Health Plan and Provider Portal Web sites" created by states in the Republican Study Committee Bill to provide consumers with standardized information on certified health plans, as well as price and quality information on providers (in the ACA this website is the face of the state-based exchange)
    • Use of various student loan programs to bolster the primary care workforce in particular, as in the Republican Study Committee bill
    • Refundable tax credits to help low-income folks buy insurance (as in Enzi, the RSC bill, and Ryan et al's bill)
    • Reducing premium subsidies for higher-income Medicare beneficiaries in Medicare Part B and Part D, as in Ryan and Coburn's bill
    • Creation of Accountable Care Organizations in Medicare, as in Ryan and Coburn's bill

    Baby, bathwater, etc.
     
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    Last edited: May 19, 2012
  2. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    The "some of Obamacare is pretty good" faction of the Republican party seems to be gaining adherents.

    First a genuine Tea Partier, Allen West, picks a few pieces he wants to keep in place:
    Now Senate Republicans seem to be on the "some of Obamacare is pretty good" train:
    Good for them.
     
  3. Sarah G
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    Sarah G When Nothing Goes Right, Go Left Supporting Member

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    In that case, they should keep it all as Republicans didn't have anything to do with these three parts of the bill. Their approval is kind of late and since we are getting close to elections, their motives are suspect.
     
  4. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    From June 2009...before Obamacare was passed..

     
    Last edited: May 30, 2012
  5. Sallow
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    Sallow The Big Bad Wolf. Supporting Member

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    If only that were true..

    :lol:
     
  6. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    Ah, but it is! As I mentioned in the OP: By abandoning every single piece of the ACA the Republicans aren't just ditching the big-ticket items I mentioned above, they're also abandoning numerous provisions originally pitched in Republican health care bills over the last 3 years (indeed, the language from those Republican bills was explicitly copied and pasted into the ACA on some occasions), as well as pieces that were new in the ACA but already endorsed by the Republican party.

    Numerous Republican ideas were put into the affordable care act. Their legislative language on tort reform, their desire to allow health insurers to sell across state lines, their goal of making high deductible plans more prevalent, etc.

    They've pretended there's nothing in there they like (certainly not the bulk of their own health agenda!), but in reality they know that even by their own standards "some of Obamacare is pretty good."
     
  7. CrusaderFrank
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    CrusaderFrank Diamond Member

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    ObamaCare is a gigantic POS that should be aborted and replaced with the Whole Food Recommendation, and even if ObamaCare added the Whole Foods Recommendations to it as a rider, it would still be a POS needing an abortion

    • Equalize the tax laws so that employer-provided health insurance and individually owned health insurance have the same tax benefits. Now employer health insurance benefits are fully tax deductible, but individual health insurance is not. This is unfair.

    • Repeal all state laws which prevent insurance companies from competing across state lines. We should all have the legal right to purchase health insurance from any insurance company in any state and we should be able use that insurance wherever we live. Health insurance should be portable.

    • Repeal government mandates regarding what insurance companies must cover. These mandates have increased the cost of health insurance by billions of dollars. What is insured and what is not insured should be determined by individual customer preferences and not through special-interest lobbying.

    • Enact tort reform to end the ruinous lawsuits that force doctors to pay insurance costs of hundreds of thousands of dollars per year. These costs are passed back to us through much higher prices for health care.

    • Make costs transparent so that consumers understand what health-care treatments cost. How many people know the total cost of their last doctor's visit and how that total breaks down? What other goods or services do we buy without knowing how much they will cost us?

    • Enact Medicare reform. We need to face up to the actuarial fact that Medicare is heading towards bankruptcy and enact reforms that create greater patient empowerment, choice and responsibility.

    • Finally, revise tax forms to make it easier for individuals to make a voluntary, tax-deductible donation to help the millions of people who have no insurance and aren't covered by Medicare, Medicaid or the State Children's Health Insurance Program.
     
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  8. Missourian
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    Missourian Gold Member

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    Except no one is saying that.

    Repeal and replace.

    I found the link to the GOP plan from 2009...I liked it then and I like it now.


    http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/pdf/GOPHealthPlan_061709.pdf?tag=contentMain;contentBody


    EDIT: Here are some of the highlights...

     
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    Last edited: May 30, 2012
  9. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    1. Fundamentally, ObamaCare is at odds with the concept of limited government, as the citizens’ right to choose- the definition of liberty- is sorely limited, and the government is in the drivers’ seat as to critical health matters.

    2. Patients, providers, and employers are responsible for the ever-changing demands of unaccountable regulators. Citizens are mandated to purchase not just healthcare insurance, but specific, detailed and mutable policies, states are mandated to expand Medicaid, and operate carefully manicured exchanges, changing the relationships of American federalism.

    a. ObamaCare is the rearrangement of the balance of the rights and the responsibilities of citizens.



    BTW, do you work for the government?
     
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  10. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    Indeed! Since they seem to be rapidly evolving toward repealing and replacing with things that are already in there, they're getting warmer.

    I wouldn't be shocked to see Ryan et al. remember their affection for exchanges in the near future.
     

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