Should the Workplace Have a "No Solicitations" Policy?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Adam's Apple, Jan 30, 2006.

  1. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    This always caused problems for our personnel department. Between kids selling for their schools, soccer teams, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, community organizations, etc., it was always a hassle between those who thought it was all right and those who didn't think it should be allowed.

    Workplace Marketplace
    By Dana Knight, The Indianapolis StarJanuary 30, 2006

    If you manage to dodge the Thin Mints co-worker, the popcorn-toting tech guy supporting the high school band will surely get you. Then there's the office manager looking to make her own fortune as an Avon consultant.

    With solicitations for sales of sweet treats, makeup and home decor abounding in the office, it often seems the workplace could just as easily be the marketplace.

    And as one of the most popular fundraisers--Girl Scout cookies--hits its prime selling season, companies and employees are struggling to find just the right balance between support of community organizations and in-your-face solicitations of co-workers.

    A poll of 10 of the city's largest companies found most don't have written policies on solicitation in employee handbooks but strongly encourage workers to be sensible with their sales tactics. No repeated e-mails asking for purchases. No cubicle-to-cubicle sales. Instead, many prefer that employees post order forms in common areas like break rooms and on company bulletin boards.

    "We'd be fine with a Girl Scout cookie order sheet," said Kate Snedeker, spokeswoman for Emmis Communications Corp., which doesn't have a formal solicitation policy. "Having your daughter go door to door to your colleagues during the workday--especially if it's the daughter of your supervisor--might be too much."

    for full article:
    http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060130/BUSINESS/601300348/1///
     
  2. Hobbit
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    Hobbit Senior Member

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    My dad always gets permission first and asks what the acceptable guidelines are. Most businesses won't mind if you simply put up a notice on your office door or cubicle that you're selling stuff for the high school band or the Girl Scouts. It's when you start harrassing coworkers that things go bad. Most businesses also frown upon using the workplace to sell things for personal gain, though they usually won't mind if you do it on your time instead of theirs (lunch breaks, etc.).
     
  3. Adam's Apple
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    Adam's Apple Senior Member

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    We finally had to enact a policy governing this practice. Order blanks could be placed on tables in the lunchroom only (no personal selling by kids or adults during business hours), and each employee was limited to one solicitation a year.
     
  4. fuzzykitten99
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    fuzzykitten99 Senior Member

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    most of the people here just put the candy bar box and envelope on the edge of their desks, and a little note saying where the money goes (ie band, theater, sports, etc) and people just decide on their own.

    and who doesn't take advantage of the girl scout cookie forms? c'mon...thin mints just out of the freezer... mmmm...cookies... I think Tim ordered like 7 boxes of those alone from his cousin this year, and 2 from his co-worker's kid. :rolleyes: I asked him to at least get a few other kinds, since I like to eat other kinds, not just thin mints...

    oh! a really tasty thing to do is crush up the thin mints into a milkshake or malt... dammit I am really craving those now.
     
  5. GotZoom
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    GotZoom Senior Member

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    Peppermint Patty Cookies > Girl Scout Thin Mints.
     
  6. Mr. P
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    Mr. P Senior Member

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    GOOD! I always hated to see someone coming with an order form!
    What ever happened to letting kids raise money? :blowup:
     
  7. Shattered
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    Way.
     
  8. Dan
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    Dan Senior Member

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    I don't mind kids selling cookies, but I know when i have a store full of customers and some guy comes in to try to sell me perfume for my girlfriend (true story), I'm pretty PO'ed.
     

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