Question about the States selling the parks

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by proletarian, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. ☭proletarian☭
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    ☭proletarian☭ Guest

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    If this guy can charge the same fees and make a profit on (most of) the state and federal parks, then why can't the States show a profit when they're bringing in the same revenue form the same fees?! :wtf:
     
  2. Sherry
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    Sherry You're not the boss of me Supporting Member

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    If you're referring to the guy who was on Beck, he's renting the parks, and he saves a bundle by not having to employ state workers.
     
  3. Avatar4321
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    Avatar4321 Diamond Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Easy. Because by definition Governments dont run efficiently at all.
     
  4. ☭proletarian☭
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    So it's a problem of government wages more than anything else?
     
  5. Sherry
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    Sherry You're not the boss of me Supporting Member

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    Well he didn't go into a detailed cost analysis, but he certainly made that point. It makes sense.
     
  6. KissMy
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    KissMy Free Breast Exam

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    Indiana leased the the entire length of the 157-mile toll road Interstate 90 for $3.8 billion to a consortium made up of the Spanish construction firm Cintra and the Macquarie Infrastructure Group (MIG) of Australia in exchange for the right to maintain, operate and collect tolls for the following 75 years. The two companies formed the Indiana Toll Road Concession Company to operate the road.

    Indiana made out because they could not run the toll road efficiently enough to make a profit. The sale made the the state 3.8 billion. This was Similar to the Chicago Skyway transaction in 2004.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2010
  7. Oddball
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    Oddball BANNED Supporting Member

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    A: Because bureaucrats are insulated from the financial consequences of their actions and poor customer service.

    Even though for-profit operations may indeed charge more, they have to, at least, try to make people feel as though they would rather have the experience than the money.
     
  8. Toro
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    Toro Diamond Member

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    Macquire Infrastructure Group has lost a bundle. Does that mean they can't run the road efficiently?

    Toll roads are being hived off to the private sector not because the government can't run a road efficiently - your tolls for the private roads are going up BTW, I've seen the numbers - but because governments are getting strapped and running out of cash. So they are selling off state assets to pay for spending now. Its kind of like selling your house so you can eat today.
     
  9. blastoff
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    blastoff Undocumented Reg. User

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    More like wages and unfunded legacy benefits states are on the hook for well into the future.

    In the aftermath of NJ governor Christie's comments last week about the state's dire financial situation, one example was bandied about by various commentators. I might not be recalling the exact numbers now but they're close. They cited a 49-year-old state employee who was retiring. During his working years the state collected something like $150k from his paychecks to go into the hopper to pay his retirement benefits. But at only age 49 the state could be on the hook for as much as $3M in benefits and health care the rest of his life. And he's just one former state employee. God only knows what the dollars add up to for all current and future retirees, but it's more than the state can possibly sustain.

    And NJ ain't alone. Plenty of other states are in a similar boat, and they're all desperate to raise cash however and wherever they can. It's a huge problem but it's not like state legislatures haven't known for decades now such problems were on their horizons. But they kept spending year after year anyway.
     
  10. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Contractors like the ones that watched the girl get beat up at the station?
    Who are more interested in profit than protecting the park?

    Parks are a trust for future generations, they are not ours to squander.
     
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