Our Future if we close our refineries...

Discussion in 'Energy' started by Philobeado, Apr 9, 2010.

  1. Philobeado
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    Philobeado Active Member

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  2. Mr. H.
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    Uh so where do refineries figure into that story?
     
  3. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Well now, anyone can have power that has a southfacing roof. And there is a firm in Oregon that is making electric motorcycles.

    BRAMMO Enertia powercycle : 100% Electric Motorcycle : Home

    One might also look up the RAV4 Electric Toyota, and consider that those were the specs for a vehicle made in 1994. Been a bit of progress on batteries since then. Were Ford, GM, or Chrysler to make a real effort on this front, we would need neither the refineries, or oil from Venzuela or any other place.
     
  4. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    Is there a move afoot to close American refineries?

    It is my understanding that American refineries are working at 97% of capacity and are making money hand over fist.
     
  5. Douger
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    Douger BANNED

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    No. That's what happens when you live in a place full of snaggle toothed, inbred, Queen worshipers.
     
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  6. Samson
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    Samson Póg Mo Thóin Supporting Member

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    How many Bushles of Oganically Grown Tomatoes will fit on an electric motorcycle?
     
  7. Old Rocks
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    Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV)

    You don’t have to wait to do your part to improve the urban environment. Zero emission, zero noise Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV) are available NOW from Smith Electric Vehicle U.S. Corp! And SEV U.S. already has 80 years of proven performance.
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Smith Electric Vehicles (SEV)

    TOP SPEED:
    50 mph

    RANGE/CHARGE:
    up to 100 miles

    PAYLOAD:
    up to 16,280 lbs

    Motor:
    120 kw induction motor

    Battery:
    Lithium-Ion Iron Phosphate

    GVW:
    16,535 lbs, 23,148 lbs or 26,455 lbs

    Battery Charger:
    Installed Full battery recharge:
    6-8 hours
     
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  9. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Now if you are a company that also runs its trucks out of big warehouses, then this ought to be of interest.

    IEEE Spectrum: First Solar: Quest for the $1 Watt

    It’s easy to make a small pile of money off photovoltaic cells but very hard to make a big one. The reason is one of the most fundamental in free-market economics: the larger the market you aim for, the more competitors you’ll have to face.

    If you just want to power a billion-dollar space probe, almost any price per watt is acceptable. If you are selling to lonely farmhouses, you just have to charge less than the cost of running a power line to the boondocks. In some parts of the world, competing with grid electricity itself may be an easy game during peak consumption hours. But if you want the off-peak market, you’ll have to price your cells at about US $1 per watt. That price is called grid parity, and it’s the holy grail of the photovoltaic industry. At least 80 firms around the world, from Austin to Osaka, are in the chase.

    Surprisingly, at the moment no company is *closer to that grail than a little start-up called First Solar, which until very *recently had been known only to specialists. It’s located in Tempe, Ariz., and analysts agree that it will very likely meet typical grid-parity prices in *developed countries in just two to four years. It’s got a multibillion-dollar order book, it’s selling all the cells it can make, it’s adding production capacity as fast as it can, and its stock price has rocketed from $25 to more than $250 in just 18 months.

    Electric motors and the components involved are far less complex than diesel engines, and their transmissions. So you would have a maintenance savings. Also, by producing most of your energy on site, net metering on a grid parallel system, you would do both yourself and the utility a favor. You would be producing electricity at the time of highest usage, but using it yourself, for charging the trucks, at the time of lowest usage.
     
  10. Samson
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    I really think these vehicles are great, and should be used in urban environments.

    And 85% of the USA lives in areas which we could call "urban."

    However, the USA is also a relatively large country whose transportation demands are well over 100 miles.

    Currently there is no technology that economically meets these demands that is not fossil fuel (unrenewable resource) based, and refineries are the only means of creating deisel and gasoline.

    Frankly, as gasoline becomes more expensive, and eventually becomes unavailable, I'm hoping to not only see "greener" resources replace it, but also movement of populations from urban areas to small towns where food, clothing, and shelter (materials) will be produced locally, and much less expensively transported to a local population.
     

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