Nuclear Fusion (Endless and Clean Energy Source)

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Whocares386, Aug 27, 2018.

  1. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    We could build power satellites now. We can't build a fusion reactor now.
    A manufacturing facility on the Moon would be very useful.
     
  2. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    How dense does it need to be to allow fusion to occur?
    Give me your best estimate...…..
     
  3. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Diamond Member

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    How many launches do you think it would take to put enough parts and material in orbit to build enough of these satellites to power the entire planet?
     
  4. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Diamond Member

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    upload_2018-9-1_18-49-50.png
     
  5. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    How many fusion reactors that haven't been invented yet would it take to do the same?

    Look, there is plenty of material on the Moon for most of the parts you'd need.

    Would it be a huge, multi-trillion dollar project? You bet your ass.
     
  6. Toddsterpatriot
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    Toddsterpatriot Diamond Member

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    Thanks. So how dense is that compared to uranium?
     
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  7. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    I wonder if he realizes that he cemented his feet in 2 concrete buckets while walking on thin ice.
    Instead of answering the question he simply posted the Lawson Criteria he stumbled upon with Google.
    After he found it he could have answered it but did not, hoping nobody else would bother to check what you get by solving n*t > (or =) 2 * 10^14 for n, the minimum required ion density to even begin nuclear fusion.
    The ballpark density for n which I used was what it takes to maintain a self sustaining fusion, which is what we are after if we want to build nuclear fusion power plants.
     
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  8. mamooth
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    mamooth Gold Member

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    I'm not going to pretend I understand everything in this wiki article, but I'll quote the important bit.

    Lawson criterion - Wikipedia
    ---
    Satisfaction of this criterion at the density of solid deuteriumtritium (0.2 g/cm³) would require a laser pulse of implausibly large energy. Assuming the energy required scales with the mass of the fusion plasma (Elaser ~ ρR3 ~ ρ−2), compressing the fuel to 103 or 104 times solid density would reduce the energy required by a factor of 106 or 108, bringing it into a realistic range. With a compression by 103, the compressed density will be 200 g/cm³, and the compressed radius can be as small as 0.05 mm.
    ---

    It does seem to be saying that, to get a realistically possible sustained fusion reaction, the deuterium/tritium fuel has be condensed to somewhere around 10 times as dense as uranium (19 g/cm^3)
     
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  9. polarbear
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    polarbear I eat morons

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    It does seem to be saying that, to get a realistically possible sustained fusion reaction, the deuterium/tritium fuel has be condensed to somewhere around 10 times as dense as uranium (19 g/cm^3)
    It does say exactly what you think it says....and we now have a bipartisan consensus although it`s only about nuclear fusion.
     
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