McCain's Full-Flop On Tax Cuts

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Star, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. Star
    Offline

    Star Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,510
    Thanks Received:
    594
    Trophy Points:
    155
    Ratings:
    +1,016
    .

    Republicans are a strange breed. Romney's campaign will go down in the annals (anals?) of American history as the biggest flop since the Edsel but-----but flops are nothing new for Republicans, remember when McCain said...



    McCain: “The issue of economics is not something I’ve understood as well as I should,”


    “I don’t believe we’re headed into a recession,” he said, “I believe the fundamentals of this economy are strong and I believe they will remain strong.”





    [​IMG]


    McCain used to oppose tax cuts


    Sen. John McCain was one of the few Republicans who opposed tax cuts proposed by President George W. Bush in 2001, and he opposed them again when they came up for renewal in 2003.
    In 2001, McCain voted against a $1.35-trillion tax cut package, arguing that the tax cuts didn't do enough for the middle class, and because of a need for increased defense spending.

    Two years later, McCain again citied fiscal prudence for opposing $350-billion in additional tax cuts, specifically citing the unknown costs for the war in Iraq.

    "No one can be expected to make an informed decision about fiscal policy at this time," McCain said. "Let us wait until we have succeeded in Iraq."

    When they came up for renewal again in 2006, though, he voted in favor of them.

    McCain said he supported the tax-cut extensions, which also reduced tax rates on capital gains and dividend income, because "American businesses and investors need a stable and predictable tax policy to continue contributing to the growth of our economy. These considerations lead me to the conclusion that we should not reverse course by letting higher tax rates take effect."
    In an interview on Fox News on Dec. 28, 2007, McCain expressed no regrets about his tax votes against Bush. He said he would have preferred a plan that included spending cuts as well as tax cuts, but added that he believes the tax cuts should now be made permanent.

    "I had significant tax cuts, and there was restraint of spending included in my proposal," McCain said during the appearance on Hannity & Colmes . "I saw no restraint in spending. We presided over the greatest increase in the size of government since the Great Society. Spending went completely out of control. It's still out of control. Wasteful earmark spending is a disgrace, and it caused us to alienate our Republican base. So these tax cuts need to be made permanent. Otherwise, they would have the effect of tax increases. But, look, if we had gotten spending under control, we'd be talking about more tax cuts today."

    <snip> ...this is an actual change of position for McCain, so we rate his change on the Bush tax cuts a Full Flop.

    The point is, the modern Republican party has given up any/all semblance of credibility.

    .
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  2. Mad Scientist
    Offline

    Mad Scientist Deplorable Gold Supporting Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    23,940
    Thanks Received:
    5,212
    Trophy Points:
    270
    Ratings:
    +7,683
    There's no difference between the two parties. That should be clear to most people now. But people seem to view it like "My Team vs. Your Team" all the while not realizing that both Parties don't play for you and aren't on your side.

    They both move in concert to move the Overton Window farther to the Left.
     
  3. Star
    Offline

    Star Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,510
    Thanks Received:
    594
    Trophy Points:
    155
    Ratings:
    +1,016
    .
    "McCain played dumb"? Poo-leeze, McCain was playing himself.

    The Arizona senator [McCain] also joined fellow Republicans Lindsey Graham and Peter King in acknowledging the need for higher tax revenues to avoid the fiscal cliff. He suggested that closing loopholes like deductions for charitable giving and home loan mortgages might be one solution, though he maintained that he is "very much opposed to raising tax rates" themselves. When challenged by host Chris Wallace, who pointed out that he once seemed to favor higher taxes for the rich, McCain played dumb.

    Another McCain
    [​IMG]


    What will the next flop for the 2008 Republican standard-bearer be-----abortion?

    .
     
  4. Star
    Offline

    Star Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    2,510
    Thanks Received:
    594
    Trophy Points:
    155
    Ratings:
    +1,016
    .


    McCain: "As far as young women are concerned, absolutely. I don't think people like me – I can state my opinion on abortion. But other than that, leave the issue alone," he said. Probed further, he added, "I would allow people to have those opinions and respect those opinions. I'm proud of my pro-life position and record, but if someone disagrees with me, I respect your views."

    Hmmm, looks to me like McCain and other leaders of the Republican party have concluded -- if they are ever able to win another election, they have to become Democrats. Am I wrong about that?
    .
     

Share This Page