Land and sea species differ in climate change response: study

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Trakar, May 27, 2012.

  1. Trakar
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    Trakar VIP Member

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    Land and sea species differ in climate change response: study

    Land and sea species differ in climate change response: study

    So for land animals it is going to be more about where there's enough water to drink and grow the plants to eat (or to feed the herbivores they eat), whereas for marine life its about pH, pretty specific temperature ranges and where the food is. Seems reasonable.
     
  2. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Already here in the Pacific Northwest we are seeing the affects on the oysters.

    Local News | Acidity in ocean killed NW oysters, new study says | Seattle Times Newspaper

    Here's why: Since 2005, wild oysters along the Washington coast and at the hatchery had been dying inexplicably in their larval stages. At first the suspect was a bacterial disease, but hatchery workers soon noticed that the die-offs only occurred after high winds drew water from the ocean deep.

    Unlike the complex mechanics of climate change, ocean acidification is just basic chemistry. Scientists long had predicted that as carbon dioxide from fossil fuels gets taken up by the seas, ocean waters — typically slightly alkaline — would slide closer to the acidic side of the pH scale. They just expected it would take 50 to 100 years.

    But Feely and other top researchers in 2007 and 2008 had discovered that the pH of marine waters along the West Coast had dropped decades earlier than expected.
     
  3. Trakar
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    That is one of the problems with many of the geoengineering schemes, high CO2 levels create other problems in addition to their "greenhouse" effects.
     
  4. bobgnote
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    bobgnote BANNED

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    Carbonic acid vids are all over YouTube, but a surprising dearth of this vital media is evident, all over the internet. I hit search last week, and first was my own post, at another forum. Second was the report of the Pacific NW oyster die-off.

    But the accelerating carbonic acid buildup threatens the oceanic food chain. The acid has an affinity, for the O2-rich, colder waters, which are killing the oysters AND they are responsible, for the big plankton blooms, at the base of the entire sub-Alaskan food chain.

    No wonder the cod aren't coming back, in a hurry. If the oceanic food chain fails, that on land is liable to go down in some way. And then the cyclonic storms will get rough. So re-green, now!
     

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