July ocean tempertures warmest ever recorded

Discussion in 'Environment' started by Old Rocks, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    New July Record for Global Ocean Temperatures
    Global ocean surface temperatures for July 2009 were the warmest on record for all the months of July going back to 1880, according to the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).

    For the record, El Nino conditions (warming of the equatorial Pacific surface waters) were starting during the month of July, but it was still a weak El Nino.

    According to the NCDC, global ocean temperatures ran 0.59 C or 1.06 F above the 20th century average and broke the old record, which was set back in 1998.
    AccuWeather.com: Global Warming News, Science, Myths, Articles
     
  2. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    I bet those poor cold fishies just partied like animals !! :lol:
     
  3. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    Algore's gonna have to make another movie.
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    Very strange kind of cooling.

    NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - NOAA: Warmest Global Ocean Surface Temperatures on Record for July

    The planet’s ocean surface temperature was the warmest on record for July, breaking the previous high mark established in 1998 according to an analysis by NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. The combined average global land and ocean surface temperature for July 2009 ranked fifth-warmest since world-wide records began in 1880.

    Global Climate Statistics
    The combined global land and ocean surface temperature for July 2009 was the fifth warmest on record, at 1.03 degrees F (0.57 degree C) above the 20th century average of 60.4 degrees F (15.8 degrees C).
    The global ocean surface temperature for July 2009 was the warmest on record, 1.06 degrees F (0.59 degree C) above the 20th century average of 61.5 degrees F (16.4 degrees C). This broke the previous July record set in 1998. The July ocean surface temperature departure of 1.06 degrees F from the long-term average equals last month’s value, which was also a record.
    The global land surface temperature for July 2009 was 0.92 degree F (0.51 degree C) above the 20th century average of 57.8 degrees F (14.3 degree C), and tied with 2003 as the ninth-warmest July on record.
     
  5. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    It makes me hot when you post those stats like that. There's just something about graphs and charts that do it for me.
     
  6. elvis
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    elvis BANNED Supporting Member

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    you getting hot is just part of global warming. :lol::lol:
     
  7. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    well---I was hoping it wasn't Rocks and his stats but I couldn't rule out that possiblity. :lol:
     
  8. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    What the scientists have to say.


    http://climatecongress.ku.dk/pdf/synthesisreport/


    Recent observations show that greenhouse gas emissions and many
    aspects of the climate are changing near the upper boundary of the IPCC
    range of projections. Many key climate indicators are already moving
    beyond the patterns of natural variability within which contemporary
    society and economy have developed and thrived. These indicators
    include global mean surface temperature, sea-level rise, global ocean
    temperature, Arctic sea ice extent, ocean acidification, and extreme
    climatic events. With unabated emissions, many trends in climate will
    likely accelerate, leading to an increasing risk of abrupt or irreversible
    climatic shifts.
     
  9. dilloduck
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    dilloduck Diamond Member

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    Oh Stop Rocks---you're driving me wild !
     
  10. Old Rocks
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    Old Rocks Diamond Member

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    University of Colorado Global mean sea level

    Long-term mean sea level change is a variable of considerable interest in the studies of global climate change. The measurement of long-term changes in global mean sea level can provide an important corroboration of predictions by climate models of global warming. Long term sea level variations are primarily determined with two different methods. Over the last century, global sea level change has typically been estimated from tide gauge measurements by long-term averaging. Alternatively, satellite altimeter measurements can be combined with precisely known spacecraft orbits to provide an improved measurement of global sea level change.
    Since August 1992 the satellite altimeters have been measuring sea level on a global basis with unprecedented accuracy. The TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) satellite mission provided observations of sea level change from 1992 until 2005. Jason-1, launched in late 2001 as the successor to T/P, continues this record by providing an estimate of global mean sea level every 10 days with an uncertainty of 3-4 mm. The latest mean sea level time series and maps of regional sea level change can be found on this site. Concurrent tide gauge calibrations are used to estimate altimeter drift. Sea level measurements for specific locations can be obtained from our Interactive Wizard. Details on how these results are computed can be found in the documentation and the bibliography. Please contact us for further information.
     

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