How much energy does it take to make 1 gallon of gasoline?

Discussion in 'Energy' started by uscitizen, Apr 20, 2011.

  1. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    One must include drilling energy, pumping, and transport from foreign sources if we are going to compare it to ethanol production which is my intent.
    Refining energy must also be included. But not domestic transport since that is needed for ethanol as well.
  2. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    And if we want to compare costs of gas vs ethanol there will be no comparison since we have spent trillions defending oil in the ME. Not counting hundreds of billions in other forms of govt subsidies to oil security/production.
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  3. Cuyo
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    Cuyo Training a Guineapig army

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    A lot more than it did when crude was seeping out of the ground in Pennsylvania. One day after all the low hanging fruit is plucked, it will exceed the energy you get from burning a gallon of gasoline, and that will herald the end of the oil age.
  4. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    I am not so sure that the production does not already consume more than 100% of yield in producing gasoline.
  5. Ernie S.
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    Ernie S. VIP Member

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    Virtually all of the energy used to produce gasoline is supplied by fuel that is a byproduct of the refining process. Diesel fuel runs generators and pumps. According to Wiki, about 46% of a barrel of crude is sold as gasoline. Seeing that oil companies also sell diesel, heavy fuel oil, tar for road surfaces and oil for lubrication, as well as byproducts used to make plastics, it would seem to me that there must be more energy produced than consumed.
  6. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    the refineries consume tremendous amounts of energy.
    the tankers burn large amounts of bunker oil/diesel.
    The drilling rigs take energy.

    Why is the amojunt of energy to make ethanol readially available and not easy to find for Gasoline?
    the liberal media?
  7. bripat9643
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    bripat9643 Gold Member

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    The energy consumed is 17% of the useable energy in the resulting fuel

    EIA Energy Kids - Oil (petroleum)

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  8. The Infidel
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    The Infidel EVIL CONSERVATIVE

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    Kind of like asking how much coal the Chevy volt will be burning to drive on the street :eek:
  9. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    Ok that is in the refining process.
    How about the transport form overseas for that portion, the drilling, the pumping, etc.

    Just want ing to figure it the same way some do for ethanol production.
    domestic transport after refining shoudl not count as it is the same for all fuel products.
  10. chikenwing
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    chikenwing Senior Member

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    1.5 gal diesel to make 1 gal ethanol.

    And this is straight from Citgo corp.

    I installed all the electrical controls to blend ethanol at the loading rack,and had a long talk one day with Citgos head engineer while doing the job.
  11. uscitizen
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    uscitizen Senior Member

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    they should use biodiesel.
    :)
  12. martybegan
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    martybegan Silver Member

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    In comparing energy sources you can't just go by the energy to produce vs. the energy availible. The issues of "density, portablility, and reliability also come up. Density is how much energy you get out of it per unit volume, which is why gasoline is better for a car than say wood. Portability is related to density, as well as how easy it is to transfer from storage to use. This is why liquid gasoline is superior to say a solid form, like high quality coal for automotive use. Finally is reliability. This is where the ICE using gas or diesel beats out things like electrics, or solar powered cars. This includes the infrastructure required to keep you supplied with said fuel.

    The issue with ethanol or biodiesel, is that unless we figure out a way to make it out of waste products, you have to grow something to make it. That needs land, lead time, and once this is done, basically similar refining techniques to make it into a fuel. I'm not dismissing ethanol/biodiesel out of hand, just worrying that the amount of land required to grow enough corn/algae/PLANT X to supplant gasoline would not be feasible.
  13. Truthmatters
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    Maybe ending the oil subsidies will effect this number?
  14. martybegan
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    martybegan Silver Member

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    So gas can go from $4.00 a gallon to $6.00 a gallon?
  15. Truthmatters
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    Truthmatters BANNED

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    whats the differance we already pay that in subsidies
  16. martybegan
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    martybegan Silver Member

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    Like any tax based expenditure, the true cost is hidden. Also it is spread out, and thus is probably less in taxes than the effect you would see at the pump.

    Add in the fact that it is a commodity and traded, any increase would have a ripple effect via speculation and hedging by refiners/users.

    Or to scale it, the subsidies (really tax breaks) amount to $4 billion a year. assuming 300M americans, thats a total of $13.33 per person. Big savings there.

    Hell lets cut the number in 1/2 to represent taxpayers. You are now up to $26.66 saved per person cutting this, without knowing how it would increase costs later on.

    But keep going after the lefts favorite boogeyman. OOOGA BOOOGA.
  17. chikenwing
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    chikenwing Senior Member

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    Not much difference,still takes more to make less??
  18. editec
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    editec Mr. Forgot-it-All

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    I don't know, but I think some of us might find this interesting

    FuelGGEBTU/unit

    Gasoline (base)[2]1 US gallon114,000 BTU/galGasoline (conventional, summer)[2]0.996 US gallon *114,500 BTU/

    galGasoline (conventional, winter)[2]1.013 US gallon *112,500 BTU/ galGasoline

    (reformulated gasoline, ethanol)[2]1.019 US gallon *111,836BTU/gal

    Gasoline (reformulated gasoline, ETBE)[2]1.019 US gallon *111,811BTU/

    galGasoline (reformulated gasoline, MTBE)[2]1.020 US gallon *111,745 BTU/

    galGasoline (10% MBTE)[3]1.02 US gallon112,000 BTU/

    gallonGasoline (regular unleaded)[4]1 US gallon114,100 BTU/

    galDiesel #2[4]0.88 US gallons129,500 BTU/gal

    Biodiesel (B100)[4]0.96 US gallons118,300 BTU/galBio Diesel (B20)[4]0.90 US gallons127,250 BTU/gal

    Liquid natural gas (LNG)[4]1.52 US gallons75,000 BTU/gal

    Compressed natural gas (CNG)[4]126.67 cu ft (3.587 m3)900 BTU/cu ft

    Hydrogen at 101.325 kPa357.37 cu ft319 BTU/cu ft[5]Hydrogen by weight0.997 kg (2.198 lb)[6]119.9 MJ/kg (51,500 BTU/lb)

    [7]Liquefied petroleum gas(propane) (LPG)[4]1.35 US gallons84,300 BTU/galMethanol fuel (M100)[4]2.01 US gallons56,800 BTU/gal

    Ethanol fuel (E100)[4]1.500 US gallons76,100 BTU/galEthanol (E85)[4]1.39 US gallons81,800 BTU/galJet fuel

    (naphtha)[8]0.97 US gallons118,700 BTU/galJet fuel

    (kerosene)[8]0.90 US gallons128,100 BTU/galElectricity33.40 kilowatt-hours *3,413 BTU/(kW·h) [9][10]*calculated based on 114,000 BTU/gal base gasolineFuelGGEBTU/unit
  19. williehouston3
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    williehouston3 Rookie

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    I am doing a paper on how much electricity that it takes to produce one gallon of gasoline from exploration to the gas station. If anyone has any helpful links to for this I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks..!
  20. beagle9
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    beagle9 Senior Member

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    You will have to keep in mind however, that there are different types of energies that are being used in the input, and this in order to create the precise energy that becomes the final product as the output, all in which is desired by us to fuel the economic engine that moves the economy in which we all depend on. Now nothing so far beats the results found in gasoline and diesel at the end of the chain, in which powers the economy in ways that no other energy can. So the final product is the most important here, because it determins the power that is found behind the engine that drives a strong economy all because of.

    Example: Can an electric car do what a gasoline driven car can do, as far as endurance and power goes to get the ultimate job done ? No it cannot, but the electric car could perform well upon a grid or within an enviroment that is designed to work best for the electric car and it's owner. Otherwise it is more economical to operate an electric car within a city or community where conditions are just right in application of, in which suits the car to be at it's best in those conditions, but outside of that grid, the electric car as does other alternative methods of transportation fails against the gasoline and diesel driven vehicles. These are vehicles that need long standing endurance and power to get the job done. It matters not about the different types of energies that are being used to get to the final gold that is found in the final product, just as long as the final product is as good as we expect when we began the journey towards that final product in which is as good as gold in the end when we are finished with it.

    This is my thoughts on the matter, but help me tweak my analysis if I am way off course here.
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2012

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