How do you respond to the interview question, "What is your greatest weakness?"

Discussion in 'Philosophy' started by usmbguest5318, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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  2. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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    Maybe that was in his mind, and maybe it wasn't. What I know is that he approached us asking for an opportunity to interview for a position we weren't seeking to fill. We agreed to consider him because hiring him appeared initially to be an opportunity that fell into our laps, as it were, and we were thus willing to make a place for him.
     
  3. Indeependent
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    Indeependent Platinum Member

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    You don't seem to be very popular with quite a number of people here.
    What it comes down to is you had a vacuous "feeling" and you don't want to admit to such.
     
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  4. evenflow1969
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    evenflow1969 Gold Member

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    You do realize those guys are laghing at you right? Have you even had one person show agreement with you?
     
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  5. deanrd
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    deanrd Gold Member

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    When ever asked that question, always answer with something positive.

    Example:

    What's your greatest weakness?:

    I never give up.

    I'm always focused on the issue. Some say too focused.

    Some say my job means too much to me.

    I'll give up my vacation time for important assignments.

    I've been told I push my coworkers to get the job done. But I have a hard time believing that because I always work so well with others. I think I'm just highly motivated.

    And so on.
     
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  6. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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    You do realize approbation from the folks here isn't something I sought, right? There is nothing in the OP for folks to approve or disapprove in any way that matters. I asked how people answer a particular question and some folks here felt it necessary to pen responses about me. That interview question I asked wasn't about me and neither is this thread, as far as I'm concerned -- and seeing as it's my thread, that's all that matters to me. Folks can answer the question I asked or they can not do so; either way I find out something I wanted to know, which was the point of my asking the question.


    As I said:
    One member here introduced all sorts of abstractions, but the fact is they are worthless musings to someone who has no current job and seeks to obtain one that allows them to resume the lifestyle to which they've become accustomed (see "Associate principal/Senior project leader" at that link).

    The fact is with the answer he gave, the interviewee showed he's not qualified for the job he sought, not by dint of his industry-specific, general business and economics skills, training and experience, for we'd have never considered interviewing him were we not of a mind that he had those "ducks in order," but by his temperament.
    To be sure, when interviewing candidates for certain non-client-facing positions, I doubt anyone asks that question. The mail clerks and other workers whose jobs call for them mainly to "put square pegs in square holes" for instance, may not be asked that question. The position he sought isn't a "blue collar" one and we weren't going to interview or treat him as though it were. In management consulting, the best subject matter KSAs aren't worth a damn if one's temperament isn't acceptable.

    The fact of the matter is that over the course of the interview process for all revenue-side employees, a candidate is going to have to answer several so-called "brain teaser" questions and they're going to have not "screw the pooch" on every single one. It's a big boon if someone "hits it out of the park" with those questions, but doing so isn't among the expectations interviewers, I, have because everyone knows that nobody likes those kinds of questions. Members here don't have to like that and neither does the guy whom I rejected and neither do they and he have to like that I asked the question I did; however, they and he will have to find their several-hundred-thousand-dollar-a-year plus-fine-benefits-and-perqs job from a different employer than my firm, be it in management consulting or some other industry.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  7. usmbguest5318
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    usmbguest5318 Gold Member

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    Don't construe the two behaviors a being mutually exclusive or as indirectly proportional to one another. Motivating colleagues to produce high quality results on-time and on-budget and working well with others both are two separate but related and required abilities of people who make good managers/leaders. How one balances and deploys those qualities is what distinguishes good and excellent managers/leaders from mediocre and poor ones. There is no good manager/leader who does not push his/her staff, and push hard, and also not work well with them and others. For professionals, the "bar" moves in only one direction, up.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  8. Dale Smith
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    Dale Smith Gold Member

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    I have had that question asked to me and my answer was "I don't accept setbacks with grace when I am working on a project. I reflect back more on my failure to deliver than I do about my successes even if the failure for the project had nothing to do with my efforts because maybe I could have changed the outcome via sheer will and where my strategic error occurred. I am not a graceful loser".
     
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  9. rightwinger
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    rightwinger Award Winning USMB Paid Messageboard Poster

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    Sorry

    But you suck as an interviewer

    For God's sake....ask relevant questions
    Don't Google "Top ten interview questions"
     
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  10. Lewdog
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    Lewdog Gold Member

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    Yep, that's the answer I usually give, or one of two others.

    #2. I always feel I could have done a better job, and don't settle for just success from a project, but instead look at ways I could improve on the next project.

    #3. I put customer service, and the happiness of the customer, over anything else as long as I'm staying within my capacity to do so by company policy. There is not a better advertisement for a company than word-of-mouth from a satisfied customer.
     
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    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018

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