Fox News Covers Mutant Seafood Story

Discussion in 'Environment' started by catzmeow, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. catzmeow
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  2. syrenn
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    Anyone who thinks all that oil just disparaged is crazy. Anyone who thinks there would be no impact on the wildlife in the ocean there for years to come is crazy.....

    One of the things i love are stone crabs. We would go every year for the opening of the season. We stopped since the oil disaster. I am going to give it a good 10 years before i start eating them again.
     
  3. catzmeow
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    We eat gulf seafood every week. :(
     
  4. Old Rocks
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    Here in the Pacific Northwest, we have a direct effect of excess CO2 killing our oysters;

    Northwest Oyster Die-offs Show Ocean Acidification Has Arrived by Elizabeth Grossman: Yale Environment 360

    21 Nov 2011: Report

    Northwest Oyster Die-offs Show
    Ocean Acidification Has Arrived

    The acidification of the world’s oceans from an excess of CO2 has already begun, as evidenced recently by the widespread mortality of oyster larvae in the Pacific Northwest. Scientists say this is just a harbinger of things to come if greenhouse gas emissions continue to soar.
    by elizabeth grossman

    Standing on the shores of Netarts Bay in Oregon on a sunny fall morning, it’s hard to imagine that the fate of the oysters being raised here at the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is being determined by what came out of smokestacks and tailpipes in the 1960s and ‘70s. But this rural coastal spot and the shellfish it has nurtured for centuries are a bellwether of one of the most palpable changes being caused by global carbon dioxide emissions — ocean acidification.

    It was here, from 2006 to 2008, that oyster larvae began dying dramatically, with hatchery owners Mark Wiegardt and his wife, Sue Cudd, experiencing larvae losses of 70 to 80 percent. “Historically we’ve had larvae mortalities,” says Wiegardt, but those deaths were usually related to bacteria. After spending thousands of dollars to disinfect and filter out pathogens, the hatchery’s oyster larvae were still dying.

    Finally, the couple enlisted the help of Burke Hales, a biogeochemist and ocean ecologist at Oregon State University. He soon homed in on the carbon chemistry of the water. “My wife sent a few samples in and Hales said someone had screwed up the samples because the [dissolved CO2 gas] level was so ridiculously high,” says Wiegardt, a fourth-generation oyster farmer. But the measurements were accurate. What the Whiskey Creek hatchery was experiencing was acidic seawater, caused by the ocean absorbing excessive amounts of CO2 from the air.

    With this already happening, you aren't going to find many here that would approve of offshore drilling.
     
  5. syrenn
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    A lot of people do. I just don't believe the oil and pollutants are gone.
     

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