Doctor Ebola Arrives in the US

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Silhouette, Aug 3, 2014.

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How Do You Feel About the CDC Allowing Ebola into the US?

  1. Insanely stupid. Shut down the nuke plants now, we're in huge trouble.

    5 vote(s)
    11.4%
  2. Reckless. A terrible idea.

    17 vote(s)
    38.6%
  3. Not my first choice but we probably can contain it.

    2 vote(s)
    4.5%
  4. I'm OK with it.

    16 vote(s)
    36.4%
  5. It's fine, our technology can fix whatever happens.

    4 vote(s)
    9.1%
  1. Silhouette
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    Silhouette Gold Member

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    The incubation rate from exposure to illness with ebola is between 2-21 days. Isolated villiages in Africa and the quick onset have been the saving grace thusfar. If this illness reaches cities...well....we're done.

    We have a nuclear power plant and waste situation to monitor. With a 60-90% fatality rate, who will be left to babysit them?

    We could recover as a society but can anyone who survives in a semi-neolithic existence monitor and keep radiation from killing anyone who was left as core after core melts down from lack of maintenance?

    This isn't a Hollywood script. This is a real life, actual, no-nonsense scenario of what will happen if Ebola spreads.

    And look what we just did. As idiot Americans we just knowingly allowed an infected doctor into US territory. And the people attending him? We don't even know how the disease spreads. "Bodily fluids" is what I hear. Well that's in a person's exhaled moisture & breath as well as other sources.

    As a livestock manager, I am S-T-U-N-N-E-D at the sheer recklessness. How did the CDC allow this???? :eek: I can only hope that when ebola breaks out in a town in the US from one of these attendants of this infected doctor, we have the balls to drop everyone in that town and not look back. Then burn all the buildings to the ground.

    What a selfish prick that doctor is. Unbelievable.
     
  2. PaintMyHouse
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    The Powers That Be are aware Chicken Little, so relax. Just because we brought a man in with Ebola doesn't mean we have never brought Ebola here. You will all be fine, unfortunately...
     
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  3. deltex1
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    deltex1 Gold Member

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    If we can treat 60000 Central American Hispaniggahs we can certainly treat this selfless Christian.
     
  4. Peach
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    Peach Gold Member

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    And the female missionary also arriving, we need to study these diseases also. It is too optimistic to believe Ebola isn't somewhere in the US, considering our georgraphy, the fact that it has not infected humans, does not equal "not here".

    The US tried that before WWII, and the Spanish Influenza outbreak, both came to the US.
     
  5. PaintMyHouse
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    Sil doesn't know that we bring bad bugs home, to study them, all the time, and used to do so just to see how good a weapon they might be, which we are no longer supposed to do but we are probably still hard at work doing. That's life on this rock.
     
  6. Silhouette
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    Silhouette Gold Member

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    The powers that be?

    Hmm...what's more powerful, the Ebola virus or people who aren't 100% sure how it's spread?

    I'm voting for the Ebola virus.

    See, this is just one more reason why lifelong intellectuals do not belong running government. Part of the requirement for old leadership having been farmers wasn't just a work ethic they'd bring to office. It was also because they'd spent their entire lives monitoring closely how social systems work, what saves them and what kills them. Certainly bringing a sick calf into a herd would bring a farmer to the poorhouse quicker than anything.

    It's just common sense. You don't do it. And all the intellectual powers in the world aren't going to matter when its spreading like wildfire out of control. Because the virus doesn't disciminate. It infects stupid mavericks as well as disciplined egg-heads.

    I, therefore, put zero faith in your prognostic prediciton.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2014
  7. B. Kidd
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    B. Kidd Gold Member

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    The State Dept. actually expedited this patient coming here!

    Under this idiotic administration, if it's bad for the U.S., by all means, lets do it.
     
  8. Silhouette
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    Silhouette Gold Member

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    That's odd because I used to work for vaccine-serum laboratory.

    It's one thing to have things sealed up with bleach washes and gown destruction after every handling. Quite another to have an infected health worker go to a local pub that night to share drinks with all the knuckleheads...

    Believe me. This thing could get out of control very quickly.
     
  9. Peach
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    Peach Gold Member

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    As we did with malaria, cholera, and many other diseases due to those who chose to give the US their genius, like this physician/researcher:

    Selman Abraham Waksman, Ph.D.

    In 1943, Selman Abraham Waksman (July 22, 1888-August 16, 1973) led a team
    of Rutgers University researchers that isolated streptomycin, the first antibiotic
    effective against tuberculosis (TB) in humans. In 1952, Waksman received the Nobel
    Prize for this discovery.

    Waksman grew up in the small Russian village of Novaya Priluka. In 1910, he
    settled in New Jersey, where a cousin operated a small farm. An interest in scientific
    farming brought him to nearby Rutgers College of Agriculture, where he
    earned a bachelor's degree in science in 1915 and a master's degree a year later. He
    completed his doctorate at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2 years, and
    returned to Rutgers to take a position as lecturer in soil microbiology.
    Waksman preferred the term "microbiology" to the conventional "bacteriology"
    because "not the bacteria but the fungi and the actinomycetes formed my major
    interests among the microorganisms" (1). By the 1930s, he was a leading figure in
    microbiology, attracting talented graduate students, including René‚ Dubos, whose
    work led to the discovery in 1939 of gramicidin, the first clinically useful topical
    antibiotic.
    Dubos' success and the introduction of penicillin prompted Waksman to put his
    graduate students and assistants to work looking for antibiotics. In 1943,
    a Waksman student, Albert Schatz, isolated streptomycin. In 1944, clinical trials
    demonstrated the drug's effectiveness against gram-negative bacteria including
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Despite substantial problems with toxicity and drug
    resistance, streptomycin soon formed the foundation of multidrug therapies for TB.
    With the introduction and use of antibiotics, mortality of TB was reduced
    drastically. In the United States, from 1945 to 1955, TB mortality decreased from
    39.9 deaths per 100,000 population (2) to 9.1. Around the world, TB remained
    (and remains) a substantial health problem, but until the emergence of multidrug-
    resistant TB, many in the United States shared Waksman's optimism, expressed in
    1964, that "the final chapter of the battle against tuberculosis appears to be at
    hand" (3).
     
  10. PaintMyHouse
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    Now you're just teasing me...
     

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