Barbers & Doctors

Discussion in 'Healthcare/Insurance/Govt Healthcare' started by Flanders, Oct 19, 2012.

  1. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    Everything Dr. Martin A. Makary says in an article by Neil W. McCabe is probably accurate. Dr. Makary’s comments are related to his book:

    I have not read the book; so I do not know if Makary covers several “healthcare” problems that I have railed against for years. My suggestions for solving those problems (reforming the healthcare system) did not call for tax increases, death panels, or socialized medicine. I always thought reform should begin by improving patient-care; coupled with real government oversight and severe penalties for medical malpractice including serious jail time for offending medical industry professionals and hospital administrators.

    My reforms zeroed in on faulty diagnoses, administering the wrong medication, unnecessary surgery, stopping HIV/AIDS tainted blood from donors in Africa from reaching patients in American hospitals and so on. Dr. Makary agrees on unnecessary surgery in some areas.

    First, a little bit about doctors when they were barbers:


    Moving on to doctoring minus the shave and haircut

    Dr. Makary touches on an important topic:


    Does that 30 percent include deaths caused by infections unrelated to the reason the patient is in the hospital? If so, the scary part is that unnecessary deaths caused by infections are grouped with medical mistakes. Those deaths are more unnecessary than moneymaking procedures.

    Multiple-occupancy rooms in existing hospitals has long been one of my complaints. My contention has been that single-occupancy rooms would go a long way towards reducing infections acquired in hospitals not to mention improving overall patient-care. More people die every year from infections they pick up in hospitals than die of HIV/AIDS. I believe the number is up around 20,000 a year. A few years ago the number was just above 18,000.

    NOTE: Hospital wards evolved into multiple-occupancy rooms; logically, the next evolutionary step is single-occupancy rooms. No doubt the bean counters will oppose with the same arguments they used in support of wards.

    I suggested that existing hospitals be given five or so years to convert to single-occupancy rooms. My single-occupancy suggestion contains a built-in stimulant for the economy; one that actually helps everyone rather than just the Wall Street crowd.

    Every hospital failing to comply after the grace period has elapsed would lose ALL government reimbursements —— federal and state. Such a move toward reform on behalf of patients instead of reform designed to enrich insurance companies and hospital owners would spark a wave of new, “healthier” hospitals once the cost of new construction is compared to the cost of conversion. In turn, healthier hospitals must make for healthier patients upon discharge; thereby, cutting the return rate.

    Since hospitals are profit-motive enterprises the owners could be given tax breaks to pay for the the transition. I would not give them a penny of taxpayer money whether they build new hospitals or convert existing ones.

    Makary goes on to say:


    After you are in the chair you tell the barber what kind of a haircut you want. I could be wrong, but I do not think Makary’s informed decisions means after the patient is on the table, nor does being informed beforehand bar the use of scare tactics in the first place.

    And I’m pretty sure no doctor wakes up an informed patient to ask for permission to do more than originally agreed upon. Example: Surgeons tell patients that removing or repairing this or that is a piece of cake. They usually back up “piece of cake” with statistics —— sometimes called odds among the punting class. Then after surgeons get inside they hack away.

    When something goes wrong doctors in the dock are protected by “I made a medical decision to save my patient’s life.” It is for that reason the American people should be suspicious of tort reform.

    Doubly suspicious of politicians who call for tort reform without explaining in detail what it is they are reforming. I’d rather congressional leaders from both political parties crack down on medical industry butchery, coverups, and larceny, than call for tort reform that gives the incompetents and the butchers even more protection than they already have. That is tort reform I can live with.

    Just to be clear. Riding herd on doctors and hospitals is one of the few good things lawyers do. Nothing reforms as effectively as lawsuits forcing charnel houses to straighten up and fly right.

    In the same vein I can understand Republicans wanting to reduce the incomes of trial lawyers, one of the Democrat party’s core constituencies, but why would Democrats go along with tort reform? Could it be they fear lawsuits stemming from death panels?

    Ultimately, haircuts and surgery are the customer’s decision not the doctor’s. A patient may agree to the initial surgery, but is never offered a choice after that. It is the things doctors do to patients after they agree to a treatment or procedure that needs reforming.

    Bottom line: Patients should tell the barber/doctor what NOT to do after he’s inside, and get it in writing. What the hell, a smart homeowner first approves of a detailed list signed by a contractor before agreeing to the repairs. The contractor does not get paid for doing anything not in the contract. Your body needs a helluva lot more protection than does the building you live in?

    Preventative medicine

    Preventative medicine is one of the biggest ripoffs in the medical industry. Everybody gets a piece of the action. Just look at the drugs advertised on TV and ask yourself how much money is spent telling healthy people they need to take a drug to stay healthy. It’s no different than telling people they must eat spinach.

    Interestingly, the first “eat for good health” campaign was a form of preventative medicine: “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” Now, doctors are prescribing drugs that supposedly keeps them away!

    As far as I know there are no statistics on the harm done, and the deaths caused, by preventative medicine. Over-prescribing preventative drugs is a much larger problem than is recommending unnecessary surgery:


    One question. Where is the doctors’ group looking into preventative drugs enriching pharmaceutical companies and Wall Street?

    Parenthetically, if you know nothing else about the relationship between Wall Street and the medical industry know this: The big money is in treatment not cure. Preventative medicine neither treats nor cures, yet it is rapidly becoming the most lucrative branch of the pharmaceutical industry, an industry aided and abetted by doctors.

    Absentee owners

    My cost-cutting reforms also said that every medical industry entity traded on Wall Street —— the casino not the thoroughfare —— be prohibited from receiving healthcare dollars directly or indirectly. Don’t bother calculating the odds on that reform being picked up by Congress? It’s a non-starter. No law curtailing even the most destructive form of absentee ownership will ever be passed in this country.

    Put it this way: If companies building gas chambers and furnaces for the same purposes they were built in Nazi Germany were traded on Wall Street no law would stop them if it adversely affected absentee ownership. Note that federal bureaucracies in cahoots with federal and state courts have all but abolished real property Rights. At the same time property Rights are being wiped out the courts have strengthened the Rights of absentee owners.

    Finally, socialized medicine was a non-starter until it included tax increases coupled with REDUCED patient-care because this entire healthcare thing is a battle between productive Americans and the parasite class. The parasites want more for themselves and the only way they can get it is to use the government to get it for them.
    Nancy Pelosi’s 4,000,000 jobs proves my case.

    There was never a pretense that said adding four million more workers to the system would improve the overall quality of patient-care. In all of the talk leading up the Affordable Care Act not one word was ever said about improving patient care; mainly because Socialists could not find a lie they could use. Unfortunately, death panels improve patient-care according to Hussein & Company.

    Instead of reform the Democrats gave us socialized medicine and called it reform.

    Here’s the link to the article I excerpted:


     
  2. atlasshrugged
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    atlasshrugged Member

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    There is way too much going on in your post, but I will comment on a few things. You pointed out that you think multiple occupancy rooms should be removed and that medical records should be used to increase transparency. These two changes would bring huge expenses to healthcare. Medical record systems that work together would take years of time and hundreds of millions of dollars to create. I agree that both would improve healthcare, but I think they are out of our reach. I feel the same way about healthcare as a human right. I wish that everyone could have good healthcare, but I don't think we, as a country, can afford it.
     
  3. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    To atlasshrugged: Rhetorical question: What’s the difference between the government taking your money and your neighbor taking your money with a gun in his hand to pay for his Rights?

    It’s an entitlement not a Right when someone else is forced to pay for it. Note that not one Right in America’s original Bill of Rights had to be paid for by someone else. Those Rights are negative Rights according to Hussein. You appear to have bought into his positive Rights that must be paid for with tax dollars.

    See this thread for a bit more about Rights:


     
  4. Ravi
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    Ravi Diamond Member

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    wtf?
     
  5. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    To Ravi: Wtf does wtf mean in your little world? Does it mean you never heard about contaminated blood? or are you denying it?

    American blood banks purchase a lot of blood from Third World countries; primarily countries in Africa. Thirty or so years ago the tragedy of using blood contaminated by HIV/AIDS was rampant. Safeguards were almost non-existent because blood banks are motivated by maximizing profits. Hospitals never showed an interest in making sure the blood they were giving patients was clean because our friends in the media never gave the scandal the coverage it deserved.

    Elizabeth Glaser (1947- 1994), wife of actor Paul Michael Glaser (Starsky of Starsky & Hutch) contracted the disease from an emergency blood transfusion. The story of contaminated blood began to get some coverage after she passed away. I’m not sure what the situation is today.

    NOTE: Call me cynical for mentioning this, but the more people with AIDS the more money the healthcare industry and pharmaceutical companies rake in. As I said in the OP “The big money is in treatment not cure.”

     
  6. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    Start with Title III ("Improving the Quality and Efficiency of Health Care") and read from there. Most of the law is about improving care for patients.
     
  7. Flanders
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    Flanders ARCHCONSERVATIVE

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    To Greenbeard: The title of the bill is: Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Death panels is the Patient Protection part, and no one in their right mind thinks that bill makes healthcare affordable.

    To Greenbeard: Nothing in that bill improves patient-care on a practical level. None of the things I discussed in the OP is addressed.

    Btw, how does funding Hussein’s personal goon squad improve patient-care? Originally, he called for a civilian national security force. In a speech on July 2, 2008 then-Senator Obama said:


    Hussein’s personal army of “community organizers” was designed to be a tax-dollar-funded para-military force before it found its way into the healthcare bill under the name Ready Reserve Corps.
     
  8. Greenbeard
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    Greenbeard Gold Member

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    The "patient protection" bit refers to a broad array of consumer protections instituted by the law, including:

    • Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) and Uniform Glossary: Most health insurance plans and issuers must provide you with an easy-to-understand summary about a health plan’s benefits and coverage.
    • Consumer Assistance Program: State Consumer Assistance Programs help you file complaints and appeals, enroll in health coverage, and learn about your rights and responsibilities as a health care consumer.
    • Appealing Health Plan Decisions: You have the right to ask your plan to reconsider a denial of payment for services.
    • Preventive Care: You may be eligible to receive recommended preventive health services at no cost.
    • Patient’s Bill of Rights: The “Patient’s Bill of Rights” outlines consumer protections and gives you the knowledge you need to make informed choices about your health.
    • Children’s Pre-Existing Conditions: Insurance companies can no longer limit or deny benefits to children under age 19 due to a pre-existing health condition.
    • Doctor Choice & ER Access: You have the right to choose the doctor you want from your plan’s network or seek emergency care at a hospital outside of your health plan’s network.
    • Grandfathered Health Plans: You have the right to keep your “grandfathered” health plan if you were covered before the health care law was enacted. Grandfathered plans do not have to provide some of the rights and protections under the Affordable Care Act.
    • Curbing Insurance Cancellations: Insurance companies can no longer cancel your coverage just because you made an honest mistake on your application.

    The Patients' Bill of Rights, in particular, is itself a laundry list of protections and rights for consumers that were finally codified by the ACA:

    I don't know what the new stipulation of "on a practical level" is meant to convey. Regardless, the ACA is chock-full of goodies to support better coordination of care, improve patient safety and limit medical errors and hospital acquired infections, measure/report and reward higher-quality care (including on measures of patient experience), support patient-centered primary care models, identify more effective treatments and interventions, improve care transitions for folks and build links to resources in communities.

    Improving care is one of the law's primary goals.
     
  9. Luddly Neddite
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    Luddly Neddite Diamond Member

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    Wow Flanders, this is some of the goofiest nonsense I've read in a long long time. You gotta stop reading crap like this. And, please, stop posting it where others can read it.

    See, the biggest problem with this is that some people are so gullible and so desperate to have their wacko beliefs reinforced, they could actually BEEE-LEEEVE completely untrue stupidity like this.

    Whoever said that if its on the Internet, it has to be true, well, let's just say, they've been reading way too much of this kinda garbage.
     
  10. Luddly Neddite
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    Luddly Neddite Diamond Member

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    Oh but, Flanders, I really must ask you where you heard that the US is buying AIDS-tainted blood from Africa?
     

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