Are we: Entering a dark age of innovation"

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Dante, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    Entering a dark age of innovation

    not my title

    Being a skeptic by nature, I side with a "conclusion of Jonathan Huebner, a physicist working at the Pentagon's Naval Air Warfare Center in China Lake, California." regarding technological innovation.

    http://accelerating.org/articles/InnovationHuebnerTFSC2005.pdf | A possible declining trend for worldwide innovation
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2010
  2. xsited1
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    xsited1 Agent P

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    He's right. Since Moore's Law was mentioned, let me just say that the physics behind Semiconductors has changed little since the 1950s. I'm hoping there will be a massive explosion in technological innovation soon. Of course, another possibility is that WW-III might start and everything on the planet will be destroyed.
     
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  3. antagon
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    antagon The Man

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  4. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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  5. Dante
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    Dante On leave Supporting Member

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    As if to bolster one side of this argument:

    A Decade Later, Human Gene Map Yields Few New Cures
    By NICHOLAS WADE 6 minutes ago
    The primary goal of the $3 billion Human Genome Project — to ferret out the genetic roots of common diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’s and then generate treatments — remains largely elusive


    A decade later...what were the early predictions?
     
  6. xsited1
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    xsited1 Agent P

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    Sure, although the technology is anything but new. They might be able to squeeze a few more transistors into a given chip if the manufacturing process is optimized, but it's certainly not innovative. My hunch is that the high-doping levels will render is useless. We'll see. I'm watching the quantum transistors myself, and am anxious to see a replacement for the transistor entirely.
     
  7. Mr.Fitnah
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    Mr.Fitnah Dreamcrusher

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    Dont worry scrote

    Narrator: As the 21st century began, human evolution was at a turning point. Natural selection, the process by which the strongest, the smartest, the fastest, reproduced in greater numbers than the rest, a process which had once favored the noblest traits of man, now began to favor different traits. Most science fiction of the day predicted a future that was more civilized and more intelligent. But as time went on, things seemed to be heading in the opposite direction. A dumbing down. How did this happen? Evolution does not necessarily reward intelligence. With no natural predators to thin the herd, it began to simply reward those who reproduced the most, and left the intelligent to become an endangered species.
     
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  8. antagon
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    antagon The Man

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    that'll do it. it shouldn't be downplayed: the extent of multi-processor workarounds for the last couple year's stall in processor tech.
     

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