7/23/1892 libs try to assassinate Frick

Discussion in 'History' started by Polishprince, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Polishprince
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    Polishprince Gold Member

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    Henry Clay Frick was shot and stabbed several times by Liberal Activist Alexander Berkman, but was a tough hombre, came back to pummel Mr. Berkman's ass and had to be pulled off by his assistants, as this video shows.

     
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  2. whitehall
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    whitehall Diamond Member

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    I bet you could characterize every political assassin as a liberal activist all the way from Booth to Hodgkinson. You almost have to cringe at the fact that the infamous American assassin of all time was a famous actor and the victim was the first Republican president. They haven't changed much in a little over 150 years when today's actors threaten a republican president with everything from arson to kidnapping to murder.
     
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    Doesn't matter who shot him, Frick was a sociopath asshole nobody needs to feel sorry for.
     
  4. Polishprince
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    Polishprince Gold Member

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    Au contraire. HC Frick was a great industrialist whose work with steel made the modern cities and transportations possible.

    Further, he was a Tremendous philanthropist. He bequeathed his New York home and art collection to the city there, to expose the teeming masses of his East Side neighborhood to fantastic art.

    Very underrated industrialist as well as philanthropist.
     
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  5. Picaro
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    He was criminal and an murderer. He didn't make steel, Carnegie's hired engineers did that. Frick owned a coke business than merged with Carnegie Steel. Both of them were nasty. Carnegie took 6 months a year off to go screw off in Europe, where ran around playing the Progressive Fabian Socialist Industrialist, while hiring private armies to shoot down American workers for the crime of resisting 14 hour work days, 7 days a week jobs at less than subsistence pay thanks to his company stores. They would recruit these people from overseas by the shiploads, lying to them to sucker them over, then screwing them over royally. lol at ''philanthropist'; donating art so he could social climb, at substantial tax deductions, isn't 'philanthropy', it's just public relations scams. Both were scum.
     
  6. Polishprince
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    Polishprince Gold Member

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    Frick's philanthropy, as well as his former friend Andy Carnegie, started long before the income tax and deductions were even invented.

    Actually steel industry jobs paid well for the time, much more than the people could make overseas.

    But more importantly, the steel industry in the late 19th Century was High Technology. Frick's operation wasn't the only one out there, and it was successful not because Frick was a prick with his employees. It was successful because he was on the cutting edge of the technology, much like the tech folks today.
     
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    Picaro Gold Member

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    Wrong. States had them; the Fed didn't have them, at least not the current form. They had property taxes, which included household goods and the like, franchise taxes, etc., etc.


    Actually they didn't. Carnegie experiments with the 8 hour days and the like for a time, then went back to sweated labor and abusive management practices, and not because he needed the money; his costs were some $35,000 per year more expensive, but his profits were in the range of $12 million per year, and he was underselling his nearest competition by 50%-75%. It wasn't necessary to abuse them so badly, he and Frick just enjoyed being assholes is all.

    Again, Frick ran coke ovens; the steel mills were run by Carnegie's chief engineer, and Charles Schwab, and most of the technology he stole from the British steel manufacturers. Carnegie's business career started with the Pennsylvania Railroad, as a flunky for Tom Scott; they both made money off of insider trading and not from 'high tech innovation n stuff'. Frick never invented anything in his life, neither did Carnegie.

    Frick's piece of the company was small, just $10 million out of a company which sold for over $300 million or so.
     

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