You Could Be Sued For Reporting Terrorists

red states rule

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
16,011
Reaction score
573
Points
48
So know, if you report suspicious activity - you may be guilty of racial profiling - according to Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Another example of why Dems cannot be trusted with national defense and national security



Bennie Thompson vs. terrorism tipsters
TODAY'S EDITORIAL
May 15, 2007


We've all seen this phrase in block letters: "REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY," followed by a 1-800 number. But if a House Democrat manages to kill a tipster-immunity measure under consideration in Congress this month, people who report suspicious behavior could be sued in civil court if the accused are not charged with a crime. November's frightened U.S. Airways "John Doe" passengers in Minneapolis are already in the crosshairs.
The lawmaker in question is Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. He thinks that granting tipsters immunity amounts to racial and religious profiling. Yes, that's the Democrats' "homeland security" pointman in the House speaking.
For two months, Mr. Thompson has deployed the profiling argument against this measure, tucked into the House transportation-security bill. The good news is that a bipartisan House majority already passed it 304-121 seven weeks ago. But sadly, Mr. Thompson is expected to strip it from the bill. He is expected to be the lead House negotiator in the coming weeks when the bill reaches conference committee, and if he is, he will have considerable sway over the final product.
Mr. Thompson would stand alone among key homeland-security players, all of whom support immunity, if he blocks it. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the Connecticut Democrat who chairs the Senate committee and ranking Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, both support it. So does Rep. Peter King, New York Republican, the ranking member in the House homeland-security committee.
How damaging it would be to leave tipsters on the hook; there could be few better ways to staunch the flow of information. Think of last week's Fort Dix tipster and ask yourself whether you would report suspicious behavior in a similar position.
The cutting edge of this debate, the case of the anonymous U.S. Airways passengers in Minneapolis, is not encouraging. These passengers observed six imams refuse to sit in their assigned seats, request metal-bearing seatbelt extensions and speak loud condemnations of the United States. After frightened passengers reported this behavior, the imams were removed from the flight. Troublemakers are routinely removed for less. But the "John Does" were sued along with the airline and regulatory authorities.
Listening to Mr. Thompson's March 27 floor remarks, it's clear that he thinks an absence of legal charges against the accused means that the tipsters can be penalized in court. This shifts the precarious balance between liberty and security much too far in one direction.
Think about this Catch-22 for a moment. The government encourages ordinary citizens to pass on potential terrorism information, as it should. But those citizens can now be sued if no charges are filed. One can literally be sued for reporting provocative behavior on an airline. We're clearly a long way from September 11. What a disgrace.

http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20070514-093346-1946r.htm
 

Rosotar

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2007
Messages
422
Reaction score
45
Points
16
Location
New Mexico
So know, if you report suspicious activity - you may be guilty of racial profiling - according to Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Another example of why Dems cannot be trusted with national defense and national security



Bennie Thompson vs. terrorism tipsters
TODAY'S EDITORIAL
May 15, 2007


We've all seen this phrase in block letters: "REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY," followed by a 1-800 number. But if a House Democrat manages to kill a tipster-immunity measure under consideration in Congress this month, people who report suspicious behavior could be sued in civil court if the accused are not charged with a crime. November's frightened U.S. Airways "John Doe" passengers in Minneapolis are already in the crosshairs.
The lawmaker in question is Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. He thinks that granting tipsters immunity amounts to racial and religious profiling. Yes, that's the Democrats' "homeland security" pointman in the House speaking.
For two months, Mr. Thompson has deployed the profiling argument against this measure, tucked into the House transportation-security bill. The good news is that a bipartisan House majority already passed it 304-121 seven weeks ago. But sadly, Mr. Thompson is expected to strip it from the bill. He is expected to be the lead House negotiator in the coming weeks when the bill reaches conference committee, and if he is, he will have considerable sway over the final product.
Mr. Thompson would stand alone among key homeland-security players, all of whom support immunity, if he blocks it. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the Connecticut Democrat who chairs the Senate committee and ranking Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, both support it. So does Rep. Peter King, New York Republican, the ranking member in the House homeland-security committee.
How damaging it would be to leave tipsters on the hook; there could be few better ways to staunch the flow of information. Think of last week's Fort Dix tipster and ask yourself whether you would report suspicious behavior in a similar position.
The cutting edge of this debate, the case of the anonymous U.S. Airways passengers in Minneapolis, is not encouraging. These passengers observed six imams refuse to sit in their assigned seats, request metal-bearing seatbelt extensions and speak loud condemnations of the United States. After frightened passengers reported this behavior, the imams were removed from the flight. Troublemakers are routinely removed for less. But the "John Does" were sued along with the airline and regulatory authorities.
Listening to Mr. Thompson's March 27 floor remarks, it's clear that he thinks an absence of legal charges against the accused means that the tipsters can be penalized in court. This shifts the precarious balance between liberty and security much too far in one direction.
Think about this Catch-22 for a moment. The government encourages ordinary citizens to pass on potential terrorism information, as it should. But those citizens can now be sued if no charges are filed. One can literally be sued for reporting provocative behavior on an airline. We're clearly a long way from September 11. What a disgrace.

http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20070514-093346-1946r.htm
Well something has to be done to keep people like you from reporting a 'terrorist" around every corner. Community policing is not the American way. It sounds too much like "big brother."

If you're going to be calling in reporting anything you consider "suspicious activity" you should be held accountable for your accusations. why should you be allowed to remain anonymous while you sling your crap around?
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
16,011
Reaction score
573
Points
48
Well something has to be done to keep people like you from reporting a 'terrorist" around every corner. Community policing is not the American way. It sounds too much like "big brother."

If you're going to be calling in reporting anything you consider "suspicious activity" you should be held accountable for your accusations. why should you be allowed to remain anonymous while you sling your crap around?
So the store clerk who prevented an attack on our troops at Ft Dix was acting like "big brother"?

You cannot fight a PC war Rosotar
 

Bullypulpit

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
5,849
Reaction score
382
Points
48
Location
Columbus, OH
So know, if you report suspicious activity - you may be guilty of racial profiling - according to Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Another example of why Dems cannot be trusted with national defense and national security



Bennie Thompson vs. terrorism tipsters
TODAY'S EDITORIAL
May 15, 2007


We've all seen this phrase in block letters: "REPORT SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY," followed by a 1-800 number. But if a House Democrat manages to kill a tipster-immunity measure under consideration in Congress this month, people who report suspicious behavior could be sued in civil court if the accused are not charged with a crime. November's frightened U.S. Airways "John Doe" passengers in Minneapolis are already in the crosshairs.
The lawmaker in question is Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. He thinks that granting tipsters immunity amounts to racial and religious profiling. Yes, that's the Democrats' "homeland security" pointman in the House speaking.
For two months, Mr. Thompson has deployed the profiling argument against this measure, tucked into the House transportation-security bill. The good news is that a bipartisan House majority already passed it 304-121 seven weeks ago. But sadly, Mr. Thompson is expected to strip it from the bill. He is expected to be the lead House negotiator in the coming weeks when the bill reaches conference committee, and if he is, he will have considerable sway over the final product.
Mr. Thompson would stand alone among key homeland-security players, all of whom support immunity, if he blocks it. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the Connecticut Democrat who chairs the Senate committee and ranking Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, both support it. So does Rep. Peter King, New York Republican, the ranking member in the House homeland-security committee.
How damaging it would be to leave tipsters on the hook; there could be few better ways to staunch the flow of information. Think of last week's Fort Dix tipster and ask yourself whether you would report suspicious behavior in a similar position.
The cutting edge of this debate, the case of the anonymous U.S. Airways passengers in Minneapolis, is not encouraging. These passengers observed six imams refuse to sit in their assigned seats, request metal-bearing seatbelt extensions and speak loud condemnations of the United States. After frightened passengers reported this behavior, the imams were removed from the flight. Troublemakers are routinely removed for less. But the "John Does" were sued along with the airline and regulatory authorities.
Listening to Mr. Thompson's March 27 floor remarks, it's clear that he thinks an absence of legal charges against the accused means that the tipsters can be penalized in court. This shifts the precarious balance between liberty and security much too far in one direction.
Think about this Catch-22 for a moment. The government encourages ordinary citizens to pass on potential terrorism information, as it should. But those citizens can now be sued if no charges are filed. One can literally be sued for reporting provocative behavior on an airline. We're clearly a long way from September 11. What a disgrace.

http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20070514-093346-1946r.htm
You are also held responsible for standing up and yelling "FIRE!" in a crowded theater. And don't forget, bearing false witness is condemned in the Bible...Or did you just ignore that part because you find it disagreeable? The Stazi would've loved you.
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
16,011
Reaction score
573
Points
48
You are also held responsible for standing up and yelling "FIRE!" in a crowded theater. And don't forget, bearing false witness is condemned in the Bible...Or did you just ignore that part because you find it disagreeable? The Stazi would've loved you.
Oh yes - now the left has to downplay the fact a terrorist attack has been prevented and start playing the race card

Libs still think they can fight - and win - aPC war
 

Bullypulpit

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
5,849
Reaction score
382
Points
48
Location
Columbus, OH
Oh yes - now the left has to downplay the fact a terrorist attack has been prevented and start playing the race card

Libs still think they can fight - and win - aPC war
Having manged a photo-lab, I can say that I, more than once, turned photos over to the police that got a child molester convicted. The operator of this photo lab did essentially the same thing, resulting in arrests. whether they can be convicted or not remains to be seen.
 
OP
red states rule

red states rule

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
16,011
Reaction score
573
Points
48
Having manged a photo-lab, I can say that I, more than once, turned photos over to the police that got a child molester convicted. The operator of this photo lab did essentially the same thing, resulting in arrests. whether they can be convicted or not remains to be seen.
They only have their own words and actions as evidence
 

Rosotar

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2007
Messages
422
Reaction score
45
Points
16
Location
New Mexico
So the store clerk who prevented an attack on our troops at Ft Dix was acting like "big brother"?

You cannot fight a PC war Rosotar
Was he demanding anonymity?

What's PC about expecting people to own the things they say?

You failed to mention the people who have been wrongly accused of being terrorists because of the color of their skin.
 

maineman

Rookie
Joined
Dec 29, 2006
Messages
13,003
Reaction score
572
Points
0
Location
guess
if someone turned me in for being a terrorist, I would sue them and take everything they own. :rofl:
 

Superlative

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2007
Messages
1,382
Reaction score
109
Points
48
So know, if you report suspicious activity - you may be guilty of racial profiling - according to Bennie Thompson, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Another example of why Dems cannot be trusted with national defense and national security

..."people who report suspicious behavior could be sued in civil court if the accused are not charged with a crime."

http://washingtontimes.com/op-ed/20070514-093346-1946r.htm

Its pretty open and shut, Feel free to report suspicious activity, but if it turns out to be a waste of time, money, and has adverse effects on their lives, you are responsible.

How can this be an example of Dems not being trusted with national defence?

How would you feel if I called the cops and told them you, RSR, are a terrorist?
It would obviously have an ill effect on you and your life, especially if you were detained or had to miss work, which would effect your family. (providing anyone could stand you long enough for you to have one)

You are such a brainwashed sociopath.

http://www.hss.caltech.edu/~mcafee/Bin/sb.html
 

mattskramer

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2004
Messages
5,852
Reaction score
362
Points
48
Location
Texas
As I say, moderation is the key and there are few absolutes. There are many grey areas to many issues. This is one such issue. Feuding neighbors have been known to file frivolous repots of child abuse merely to get someone else in trouble. Ultimately, courts will decide if a complaint is frivolous and petty, or if one was acting with reasonable concern. It can decide if one is acting out of sheer paranoia, prejudice, hate, and causing undue trouble or has legitimate questions about someone else’s unusual activity.
 

RetiredGySgt

Diamond Member
Joined
May 6, 2007
Messages
47,980
Reaction score
10,026
Points
2,040
Location
North Carolina
I must assume that all the people on this thread INSISTING that tipsters that are wrong can and should be sued MUST oppose the current laws and regulations on Social Services and how families are treated in the US.

This is in fact the STANDARD for them. You legally have no right to know who accused you nor even of the specific accusations.
 

Annie

Diamond Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
50,848
Reaction score
4,826
Points
1,790
if someone turned me in for being a terrorist, I would sue them and take everything they own. :rofl:
Ok, when you behave in a manner like the Immams, I would report you. Now, if the report is less than the parameters of bringing them to court, I'm wrong? Btw, it wouldn't matter if you are WASP or Arab or something else.
 

maineman

Rookie
Joined
Dec 29, 2006
Messages
13,003
Reaction score
572
Points
0
Location
guess
Ok, when you behave in a manner like the Immams, I would report you. Now, if the report is less than the parameters of bringing them to court, I'm wrong? Btw, it wouldn't matter if you are WASP or Arab or something else.
have you ever been in Kennedy airport at an El Al flight to Ben Gurion? There are always a shitload of hassidic jews behaving in a very strange manner. I imagine you'd report all of them too? Now THAT would definitely land you in court and an entire block of Brooklyn would own everything you ever had or have or will have.
 

Ninja

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
2,220
Reaction score
381
Points
48
Location
Glorious People's Republic of California
It's more than acting in a "bizarre" manner (and let's be honest - "bizarre" to you is anyone who isn't a militant Wahabbist).

When the hasidim start crashing planes into buildings, we'll talk. Dumbass.
 

maineman

Rookie
Joined
Dec 29, 2006
Messages
13,003
Reaction score
572
Points
0
Location
guess
It's more than acting in a "bizarre" manner (and let's be honest - "bizarre" to you is anyone who isn't a militant Wahabbist).

When the hasidim start crashing planes into buildings, we'll talk. Dumbass.

when American muslims start crashing planes into buildings, we'll talk. dumbass.
 

maineman

Rookie
Joined
Dec 29, 2006
Messages
13,003
Reaction score
572
Points
0
Location
guess
are you aware of the racial ethnicity of those imams in the airport?
 

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top