Yemen Post says Awlaki probably alive

Quantum Windbag

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This could be bad for everyone, and it illustrates why Obama was smart to send the SEALS after bin Laden.

Amongst those who went to the province was his father, a former minister and university dean. Tribal leaders in Jawf told the family that Awlaqi was not killed in the attack.
Tribes in the province say there is no proof that Awlaqi was amongst the killed and DNA tests on the remains of the five killed can prove that.
An al-Qaeda senior leader also denied the claims that Awlaqi was killed and said that he will soon come out with a statement to prove that.
Anwar Awlaqi Most Likely Alive- Yemen Post English Newspaper Online
 

dukect45

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If this is true then Pres. Obama has even more egg on his face not like he needs any more
 

waltky

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Yemen's Saleh To Resign...
:clap2:
Yemen's Ali Abdullah 'to step down within days'
8 October 2011 - President Ali Abdullah Saleh has faced months of widespread protest
Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh has said that he will step down from power within the "coming days". Mr Saleh has appeared to be ready to resign several times, but pulled out of deals to stand down at the last moment. He returned to Yemen unexpectedly last month from Saudi Arabia where he had been receiving treatment after his office was shelled in June. He is faced with protests and an insurrection by renegade army units.

He has also repeatedly refused to sign a transition deal brokered by Gulf states, and first presented in March, whereby he would hand over power to his vice-president in return for immunity from prosecution. But Yemen's deputy information minister told the BBC that Mr Saleh was no longer clinging to power.

'Reject power'

In Mr Saleh's speech, broadcast on state television, he gave no precise date for standing down. "I reject power and I will continue to reject it, and I will be leaving power in the coming days," he said. "It's not because I crave power, I reject power and I will leave it in the coming days and leave it behind," Mr Saleh said. "There are sincere men, whether they be military or civilian," who are capable of governing Yemen, he added. But the speech appears not to have referred to the Gulf-mediated transition deal.

Indeed in his first interview since returning to Yemen in late September, Mr Saleh said he would not stand down as promised if his opponents were allowed to stand in elections to succeed him. His rivals for political power are currently Gen Ali Mohsin al-Ahmar, who declared his support for the protest movement in March, and the powerful Ahmar family. Anti-government protesters have been camped out in an area of the capital Sanaa - dubbed Change Square - since January, demanding an end to President Saleh's rule.

Security challenges
 

Photonic

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This could be bad for everyone, and it illustrates why Obama was smart to send the SEALS after bin Laden.

Amongst those who went to the province was his father, a former minister and university dean. Tribal leaders in Jawf told the family that Awlaqi was not killed in the attack.
Tribes in the province say there is no proof that Awlaqi was amongst the killed and DNA tests on the remains of the five killed can prove that.
An al-Qaeda senior leader also denied the claims that Awlaqi was killed and said that he will soon come out with a statement to prove that.
Anwar Awlaqi Most Likely Alive- Yemen Post English Newspaper Online
Highly unlikely given US Intelligence.
 
OP
Quantum Windbag

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This could be bad for everyone, and it illustrates why Obama was smart to send the SEALS after bin Laden.

Amongst those who went to the province was his father, a former minister and university dean. Tribal leaders in Jawf told the family that Awlaqi was not killed in the attack.
Tribes in the province say there is no proof that Awlaqi was amongst the killed and DNA tests on the remains of the five killed can prove that.
An al-Qaeda senior leader also denied the claims that Awlaqi was killed and said that he will soon come out with a statement to prove that.
Anwar Awlaqi Most Likely Alive- Yemen Post English Newspaper Online
Highly unlikely given US Intelligence.
The same intelligence that prevented the Times Square bomber and the underwear bomber?
 

waltky

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What I really want to know - should I stay or should I go...
:cuckoo:
Standoff in Yemen as President Again Backs Away From Stepping Down
October 9, 2011 - Amid all the chaos and conflict that has engulfed Yemen, one fact seems immutable: President Ali Abdullah Saleh will not voluntarily leave office anytime soon.
The vaguely worded pledge he issued Saturday to step aside appeared, a day later, to be just another feint. While he had seemed to be moving toward accepting a plan initially proposed in the spring by the Gulf Cooperation Council to cede power to a transitional government, two high-ranking Yemeni officials said Sunday that the country’s foreign minister had traveled to the United Arab Emirates to offer the council a new plan. This one, they said, calls for Mr. Saleh to remain in office until elections next year.

There was no immediate confirmation, but Mr. Saleh has repeatedly suggested that he would accept some version of the original plan, only to shift away from any real concessions to the political opposition. (The political opponents have been willing to negotiate for his early departure, in contrast to the street protesters, who are adamant that he resign immediately.) A canny strongman who has ruled a fractured and impoverished country for 33 years, Mr. Saleh has withstood the pressure from both groups of opponents, as well as from regional powers and from a onetime ally, the United States. The serious injuries he suffered in June, when a fiery bomb exploded at the mosque in the presidential compound, forced him to seek months of treatment in Saudi Arabia, but could not ease his grip on power.

He has done no more than toy with the plan proposed in the spring by the Gulf Cooperation Council, which offers him and his family immunity. The governing party’s new line is that “he will remain president until the early elections,” said one of the officials, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. The foreign minister, Abu Bakr al-Qirbi, has met with a number of diplomats in recent days, including envoys from Russia, China, the European Union, and — just before leaving for the Emirates on Sunday — the United States, according to the Saba news agency. Mr. Saleh’s government has made much of its role in providing the United States with the crucial intelligence on the whereabouts of the American-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, enabling the C.I.A. to kill him in a drone strike at the end of September.

The council’s political transition plan, known as the Gulf initiative, was vague from the start. It was devised to find a way to ease Mr. Saleh out of office after Yemen’s antigovernment protests reached a crippling pitch. The governing party, including Mr. Saleh, initially agreed that after the initiative was signed he would immediately transfer all presidential authority to his deputy. However, Mr. Saleh, at the last second, went back on his promise to sign the agreement. Since then, moderates from the government and opposition have bickered over details of the plan, which was revised many times, with the guidance of the international community, including to a very large extent the United States.

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ladyliberal

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A number of US news organizations, including WaPo and Fox, have reported that Awlaki was killed by US drones, citing unnamed US officials (Anwar al-Awlaki - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). The Yemeni government has also said that Awlaki was killed. It's possible that the US government was mistaken (I think it's unlikely that they deliberately lied, since it would be too easy for Awlaki to prove he was alive and embarrass them) but I'm not going to take the word of a Yemeni newspaper or Yemeni tribal authorities.
 

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