Why is Barack Obama considered something special?

Little-Acorn

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What's so special about Barack Obama?

He seems to be your basic liberal, and he's black, and only has a few years on the job. Pretty articulate. He recites the standard liberal bromides pretty well: Increasing minumum wage will help, raising taxes will help, something's wrong with the gap between rich and poor, Republicans are racists, etc., the usual tripe. He is rated as the 18th most liberal member of the Senate, which puts him slightly ahead of the middle of the pack of Democrats. In other words, he's pretty much a cookie-cutter standard liberal politician. Nothing particularly worse than any other liberal, nothing particularly better.

So why is the media going ga-ga over him, but not over any of the other liberals newly elected in 2004 or 2006?

What position of Obama's is different from any of the other liberals?

--------------------------

http://news.yahoo.com/s/realclearpolitics/20061211/cm_rcp/the_messiah_cometh_to_new_hamp

Susan Milligan of the Boston Globe described Obama as delivering "an uncomplicated message" of hope and promise, which I assume she meant as a compliment. Ditto Seth Gitell in the New York Sun, who writes that Obama's candidacy is "is shaping up as the perfected form of the campaign Senator Bradley of New Jersey attempted to run in 2000 and Governor Dean attempted with more success in 2004."

Here's more flavor of the coverage from Adam Nagourney of the New York Times:

"I've never seen anything like this before this early," said Mike Ballantine, a computer programmer from Nashua, as across the room Mr. Obama was surrounded by more than 100 people, many holding up his book and hoping for an autograph. "I mean it's amazing. Really amazing."

And the reality of Mr. Obama -- as opposed to what people had read or seen in weeks of extraordinarily favorable coverage -- struck a chord with some. "I was very impressed with the fact that he wants to bring people together," said Betsy Shultis, a former state representative. "I was very taken with him."

Elizabeth Fairchild, 37, of Rye, N.H., said: "I thought he was fantastic. He exceeded my expectations."

Another swooning Democrat told Dan Balz of the Washington Post , "I do hope he runs. I haven't been so excited by someone since JFK, when he was campaigning when I was 10 years old."

And if likening Obama to Dem icon JFK isn't high enough praise, a 64 year-old artist in Portsmouth went a step further, saying of Obama to reporter Paul West of the Baltimore Sun, "I see him as very messianic."
 

dilloduck

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What's so special about Barack Obama?

He seems to be your basic liberal, and he's black, and only has a few years on the job. Pretty articulate. He recites the standard liberal bromides pretty well: Increasing minumum wage will help, raising taxes will help, something's wrong with the gap between rich and poor, Republicans are racists, etc., the usual tripe. He is rated as the 18th most liberal member of the Senate, which puts him slightly ahead of the middle of the pack of Democrats. In other words, he's pretty much a cookie-cutter standard liberal politician. Nothing particularly worse than any other liberal, nothing particularly better.

So why is the media going ga-ga over him, but not over any of the other liberals newly elected in 2004 or 2006?

What position of Obama's is different from any of the other liberals?

--------------------------

http://news.yahoo.com/s/realclearpolitics/20061211/cm_rcp/the_messiah_cometh_to_new_hamp

Susan Milligan of the Boston Globe described Obama as delivering "an uncomplicated message" of hope and promise, which I assume she meant as a compliment. Ditto Seth Gitell in the New York Sun, who writes that Obama's candidacy is "is shaping up as the perfected form of the campaign Senator Bradley of New Jersey attempted to run in 2000 and Governor Dean attempted with more success in 2004."

Here's more flavor of the coverage from Adam Nagourney of the New York Times:

"I've never seen anything like this before this early," said Mike Ballantine, a computer programmer from Nashua, as across the room Mr. Obama was surrounded by more than 100 people, many holding up his book and hoping for an autograph. "I mean it's amazing. Really amazing."

And the reality of Mr. Obama -- as opposed to what people had read or seen in weeks of extraordinarily favorable coverage -- struck a chord with some. "I was very impressed with the fact that he wants to bring people together," said Betsy Shultis, a former state representative. "I was very taken with him."

Elizabeth Fairchild, 37, of Rye, N.H., said: "I thought he was fantastic. He exceeded my expectations."

Another swooning Democrat told Dan Balz of the Washington Post , "I do hope he runs. I haven't been so excited by someone since JFK, when he was campaigning when I was 10 years old."

And if likening Obama to Dem icon JFK isn't high enough praise, a 64 year-old artist in Portsmouth went a step further, saying of Obama to reporter Paul West of the Baltimore Sun, "I see him as very messianic."
New name--multicultural--media sweeetheart. He better watch out. This is the kind of rocket that falls fast and hard.
 

Gem

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In no particular order:

- he's black

- he's young

- he's handsome

- he's well-spoken

- he's liberal


This is all that matters at this particular time. The media is deeply smitten with the handsome, well-spoken, young black man who reminds them of Bill Clinton (you remember, the "first" black president), and John Kennedy.

Unfortunately...he does not have much else going for him at this point in time. This isn't an insult to his character - he's simply a young Senator who hasn't had time to do enough to warrant handing him the role of President of the United States of America. Perhaps in 2012 he will be more prepared...but truthfully, the role of Senator rarely is one that wins over Americans - we rarely vote for them for President.

Interestingly, Obama and Hillary have, in my opinion, the same problem. Both are very inexperienced and relatively unlauded Senators who would not even be whispered about as candidates if they were not minorities.

So I suppose the question we should be asking is: Does nothing more than being half-black, or having a uterus qualify you to be President of the United States of America?
 

dilloduck

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In no particular order:

- he's black

- he's young

- he's handsome

- he's well-spoken

- he's liberal


This is all that matters at this particular time. The media is deeply smitten with the handsome, well-spoken, young black man who reminds them of Bill Clinton (you remember, the "first" black president), and John Kennedy.

Unfortunately...he does not have much else going for him at this point in time. This isn't an insult to his character - he's simply a young Senator who hasn't had time to do enough to warrant handing him the role of President of the United States of America. Perhaps in 2012 he will be more prepared...but truthfully, the role of Senator rarely is one that wins over Americans - we rarely vote for them for President.

Interestingly, Obama and Hillary have, in my opinion, the same problem. Both are very inexperienced and relatively unlauded Senators who would not even be whispered about as candidates if they were not minorities.

So I suppose the question we should be asking is: Does nothing more than being half-black, or having a uterus qualify you to be President of the United States of America?
If those are the only two things that can emotionally charge the voters then I don't think it makes a difference if they are qualified or not. The presidency has become a popularity contest that's up to the highest bidder with the most "charisma" .
 

manu1959

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In no particular order:

- he's black

- he's young

- he's handsome

- he's well-spoken

- he's liberal
i could have sooooooooooooooo much fun with this list....alas i shal refrain
 

Annie

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He really has little going for him, including even experience at the state level. It will be noticed, trust me, Hillary will not leave that fact under a rock:

http://www.slate.com/id/2155121/

Barack StarFollowing Obama through New Hampshire.
By John Dickerson
Posted Monday, Dec. 11, 2006, at 12:17 AM ET


PORTSMOUTH, N.H.—Brenda Bladen was trying to explain why she liked Barack Obama so much—he was authentic, selfless, and inspirational. He was restoring her faith in politics. "I'm not comparing him to Jesus Christ but … " she said, before talking about the senator's humble beginnings.

No description or venue seemed big enough to accommodate Barack Obama's first visit to New Hampshire. In Portsmouth, it was standing room only as he signed his book The Audacity of Hope in a community ballroom normally used for wedding receptions. The 750 tickets for the event sold out in 24 hours. (One thousand people showed up.) In Manchester, 1,500 tickets to a Democratic Party celebration were snapped up in three days. (About 1,700 showed.) "We originally scheduled the Rolling Stones," Gov. John Lynch joked to the Manchester audience before Obama was introduced, "but we canceled them when we figured out that Sen. Obama would sell more tickets." When Lynch said, "Sen. Obama, should you choose to run," the crowd interrupted with one of the biggest reactions of the night.

It's easy to see why New Hampshire Democrats were in a frenzy over Obama. He is a winning presence in a room. He is stylish in his uniform of white shirt, no tie, and dark blazer. He carries himself with the weightless self-possession men's magazines achieve only by employing a team of stylists and wardrobe artists. Even his left-handed signature is elegant—a B and an O connected by confident slashes. If he really were a rock star, he'd have it etched into the side of his private plane. "I didn't know about the charisma factor," said Jessica Hayes leaving Portsmouth. "Now I know. I'm in love." (In Portsmouth, people waited in line for over an hour to have him sign a copy of his latest book.)

But coolness doesn't get you elected, and coolness wasn't what had the New Hampshire audiences even more excited after they heard Obama speak. They were in love with the senator's message, a call to political renewal and rebirth that eschews what he calls the "24-hour, slash-and-burn, negative-ad, bickering, small-minded politics." The audiences in New Hampshire reacted to his remarks with one-word appraisals: inspirational, uplifting, moving.

Obama was calling the country to a new sense of purpose but he also seemed to be offering a preview of his campaign narrative. The audacity of hope, as he described it, is a calling to use your will and imagination to take on impossible tasks. He traced that spirit through America's history, arguing that it animated the founders, the abolitionists, and the immigrants who came to the country looking for a better life. Those causes were ennobled because they were carried out against great odds and when cynical voices said nothing could be done. This narrative will serve two political purposes if Obama runs. It makes his inexperience a virtue—he's not a part of the cynical system he's uprooting—and it gives Obama historical gravitas by linking his attempt to change politics to those sweeping social changes he cites. Anyone willing to translate what this means?

Obama has said he will announce whether he's running for the White House early in the new year. He's been meeting with key advisers to talk about fund raising and hiring staff and discussing the enormous commitment with his wife. Asked in a press conference whether his wife is enthusiastic about a presidential campaign, he said he would keep private discussions private, but added, "She is the smartest, toughest, funniest best friend that I could ever hope for, and she's always had my back. Whatever decision we make, we'll make together." (This will not lose him female voters.) Newsweek reports that she is already on board.

It looked like Obama was already running. (The swarm of media following him made it look like he'd already been elected.) Setting someone up for a grand fall, anyone?Aides collected names and contact information of those attending the book signing, in order to contact them later. At a local coffee shop, Obama touched as many passers-by as he could, being careful in most instances to find out if they were residents or visiting from out of town, so that he could focus his attention on those who could vote for him in the primary. He also displayed skill at the finer political points: He paid special attention to young children, sharing stories about his young daughters; used his wife, who was not with him, as a foil to make fun of himself; and paid careful attention to New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd.

If he decides to run, Obama faces the difficulty of any politician campaigning against politics as usual—he can't act politically or he ruins his brand. Running for president is exhausting, brutal, and chaotic even if you're using the old playbook. Obama is suggesting he will go through that slog under a new set of rules that include a higher standard of candor for himself and greater fairness toward his opponents than has ever been practiced in electoral history. That is audacious and perhaps impossible.

Obama is a smart enough politician that he knows he has become too popular too fast. He knows that he benefits from being in the first stage of political courtship, where he can get away with sweeping and grand generalities. "I am suspicious of the hype," he said at his press conference. He downplayed the fuss over his potential candidacy, saying he is just the flavor of the moment and a mere "symbol or stand-in for a spirit that says we are looking for something different—something new."Uh huh, that is why we are all reading this drivel... It's wise for him to temper expectations for his candidacy. If voters stay in such a deep state of affection, they may get disappointed some day when he doesn't walk on water.
 

jillian

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i could have sooooooooooooooo much fun with this list....alas i shal refrain

Heh! Actually, one politico I know who's run lots of campaigns doesn't think he's "black enough" because his black ancestors didn't go through the slavery experience so he comes from a different place.

Also, if you listen to him, he's not that "liberal" either. He resonates because he's pretty moderate on "values" issues.

What he does have is charisma... something sorely lacking on both sides of the aisle.

I still think 12% of democrats supporting him isn't anything to write home about yet. It's gonna be a long and interesting primary season....
 

jillian

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In no particular order:

- he's black

- he's young

- he's handsome

- he's well-spoken

- he's liberal


This is all that matters at this particular time. The media is deeply smitten with the handsome, well-spoken, young black man who reminds them of Bill Clinton (you remember, the "first" black president), and John Kennedy.

Unfortunately...he does not have much else going for him at this point in time. This isn't an insult to his character - he's simply a young Senator who hasn't had time to do enough to warrant handing him the role of President of the United States of America. Perhaps in 2012 he will be more prepared...but truthfully, the role of Senator rarely is one that wins over Americans - we rarely vote for them for President.

Interestingly, Obama and Hillary have, in my opinion, the same problem. Both are very inexperienced and relatively unlauded Senators who would not even be whispered about as candidates if they were not minorities.

So I suppose the question we should be asking is: Does nothing more than being half-black, or having a uterus qualify you to be President of the United States of America?
I think you're correct to a significant degree. Personally, I think Hillary Clinton would be a huge mistake because she can't win a general election. But as to Obama's lack of experience, he's about where John F. Kennedy was when he was elected. And Bush only had a brief tenure as governor and had no experience with foreign affairs... which is something I suspect people are going to look for next time around given the disasterous results of that lack of experience.
 

dilloduck

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I think you're correct to a significant degree. Personally, I think Hillary Clinton would be a huge mistake because she can't win a general election. But as to Obama's lack of experience, he's about where John F. Kennedy was when he was elected. And Bush only had a brief tenure as governor and had no experience with foreign affairs... which is something I suspect people are going to look for next time around given the disasterous results of that lack of experience.
They hide lack of experience these days by claiming that the candidate is not an "insider" which somehow absolves him of all political guilt. People vote with thier hearts, not thier heads. All he needs now is for Hillary to shred him and he can achieve victim status. Being a "victim" gets you far these days.
 

Bonnie

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In no particular order:

- he's black

- he's young

- he's handsome

- he's well-spoken

- he's liberal


This is all that matters at this particular time. The media is deeply smitten with the handsome, well-spoken, young black man who reminds them of Bill Clinton (you remember, the "first" black president), and John Kennedy.

Unfortunately...he does not have much else going for him at this point in time. This isn't an insult to his character - he's simply a young Senator who hasn't had time to do enough to warrant handing him the role of President of the United States of America. Perhaps in 2012 he will be more prepared...but truthfully, the role of Senator rarely is one that wins over Americans - we rarely vote for them for President.

Interestingly, Obama and Hillary have, in my opinion, the same problem. Both are very inexperienced and relatively unlauded Senators who would not even be whispered about as candidates if they were not minorities.

So I suppose the question we should be asking is: Does nothing more than being half-black, or having a uterus qualify you to be President of the United States of America?


Sadly for some I don't think so. When people can't even name the vice president when interviewed on the street, it's rather telling.
 

Gem

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At this point, it might be best just to give up and hire an actor. We'd get great moving speeches...and really thats all that most of the general public wants or pays attention to.

I think Morgan Freeman might be a good choice. :)
 

Bonnie

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At this point, it might be best just to give up and hire an actor. We'd get great moving speeches...and really thats all that most of the general public wants or pays attention to.

I think Morgan Freeman might be a good choice. :)
He does have a great voice and delivery style for speeches.....
 

Hobbit

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Barack Hussein Obama does have one small problem. Yeah, I know it shouldn't matter, but weren't we just talking about how easily swayed much of the voting public is by the dumbest things? I mean, think about it, there are actually people out there who voted for Jimmy Carter twice. Once, I can forgive, but after 4 years in office?
 

Bonnie

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Heh! Actually, one politico I know who's run lots of campaigns doesn't think he's "black enough" because his black ancestors didn't go through the slavery experience so he comes from a different place.

Also, if you listen to him, he's not that "liberal" either. He resonates because he's pretty moderate on "values" issues.
What he does have is charisma... something sorely lacking on both sides of the aisle.

I still think 12% of democrats supporting him isn't anything to write home about yet. It's gonna be a long and interesting primary season....

Jillian exactly where is he a moderate on issues????

Sponsored a pointless and burdensome unfunded mandate requiring local police departments to racially profile every traffic stop (because of course categorizing citizens by race is the most important problem local law enforcement must address. One wonders: if Sen. Obama gets stopped, which box do the police check for him? Is it just me or should he, given his mixed race parentage be the last person suggesting such a stupid law?)
Voted No on Constitutional amendment banning so-called "same-sex" marriage

Supported including "sexual orientation" in Illinois anti-discrimination laws

Opposes gun rights (NRA rating-F; Illinois Citizens for Handgun Control Rating-A)

Voted Against prohibiting early release for criminal sexual abusers

Voted "present" on a law prohibiting pornographic bookstores and strip clubs to be fewer than 1000 feet of schools and churches

Supported legislation making health care a "constitutional right," promoted by left-wing Physicians for National Health care, whose goal is socialized medicine for America, a goal Obama apparently shares

Opposed the state version of the Born Alive Infant Protection Act, which would require medical attention be given to babies fortunate enough to survive a botched abortion

Favors allowing partial birth abortion, which his wife called a ‘legitimate" medical procedure in a fund-raising letter

Voted "present" on a law requiring parental notification before a minor's abortion
 
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Little-Acorn

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So there is nothing special about Obama, except youth, color, literacy, an extreme liberal voting record, and a nice smile - unimportant qualities that many other liberals possess. Yet the media is boosting Obama hugely as a Presidential candidate, and ignoring the others.

I don't recall, say, Christopher Cox (R-CA) being treated this way in the 1992 elections. He had all those qualities (except skin color)... and he was a solid conservative.

Good to know the media isn't biased.
 

dilloduck

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So there is nothing special about Obama, except youth, color, literacy, an extreme liberal voting record, and a nice smile - unimportant qualities that many other liberals possess. Yet the media is boosting Obama hugely as a Presidential candidate, and ignoring the others.

I don't recall, say, Christopher Cox (R-CA) being treated this way in the 1992 elections. He had all those qualities (except skin color)... and he was a solid conservative.

Good to know the media isn't biased.
If we should be concerned about the media focusing our attention on what they want us to see, shouldn't we be equally suspicious of issues that the media refuses to cover?
 

ScreamingEagle

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dilloduck

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Yeah, like did you know Barack Hussein Obama's father died leaving THREE wives?
Barack himself can't get any more to the LEFT...he is no moderate.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,210585,00.html
Liberals see him as an icon representing thier social policies. They swoon in the vicarious thrill of a victim that has thrown off the shackles of the evil "system" knowing full well that any criticism well be met with thier cries of " RACISM ".

muuaaaaaaaaahhahaHAHAHAHAHAA IT IS ALIVEEEEEE !!!
 

Bonnie

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Liberals see him as an icon representing thier social policies. They swoon in the vicarious thrill of a victim that has thrown off the shackles of the evil "system" knowing full well that any criticism well be met with thier cries of " RACISM ".

muuaaaaaaaaahhahaHAHAHAHAHAA IT IS ALIVEEEEEE !!!
More importantly is they see Hillary as unelectable because her socialistic ideals are well known, they think they can schmooze Obama into office before the truth gets out....Heaven help Dr Rice if she ever decides to run, wrong politics for her....
 

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