Who are the Israelis?

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
11,234
Reaction score
1,955
Points
290
RE: Who are the Israelis?
⁜→ P F Tinmore, et al,

I admit I'm out of sync here. What is your context and intent?

All over the world the governments are out of step with their people.
(COMMENT)

I would consider this a positive sign pertaining to the practice of medicine in a secular manner.
• Do you not see it that way?​
• Do you see harm or reason why it should not be that way?​

1589969410040.png

Most Respectfully,
R
I just wonder what it would be like if the Israel government did not have a settler colonial policy.
 
Last edited:

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
11,234
Reaction score
1,955
Points
290
Forever: An Ode to the People of Israel

Jerusalem U presents a powerful new Israel video about Jewish pride, Jewish belonging and Jewish beliefs from African-American poet Chloé Valdary: a leading new voice in the pro-Israel movement, a former Tikvah fellow at the Wall Street Journal, and one of Algemeiner’s top 100 people positively affecting Jewish life today.

This is what it means to be an indigenous people - belonging and surviving.

Chloe discusses what Israel means and has meant throughout the history of the Jewish people. We are an indigenous people - and here is what it means to people at the Western Wall praying, to people with Auschwitz tattoos, to people that have fought with every fiber of their beings for the Zionist movement. With her Israel poetry, she eloquently describes the significance of the Jewish homeland. Chloé is the Director of Partnerships and Outreach at Jerusalem U.

 

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
11,234
Reaction score
1,955
Points
290
Muslim Arab singer poised to take Israeli pop scene by storm

Before hitting "play" on Amir Abu's latest single, it might give you the wrong impression. With a title like Balagan ("Chaos"), the first thing that comes to mind is a Middle Eastern upbeat pop song. But a few seconds into it, it turns out to be a ballad by an artist who defines himself as "sensitive." The "chaos" he is singing about is in his own heart.

Abu, a 26-year-old Muslim Arab, was born and raised in Beersheba and attended Jewish schools his entire life. He caught the music bug from his father, who plays the oud.

After appearing on a musical reality show that ended after only nine episodes, Abu recorded Arabic covers of Hebrew songs, made his own music videos, and put them online. His latest song, Balagan, features the two languages in which he has lived his entire life -- Arabic and Hebrew.

"This is the first song that I wrote together with my musical director, Nofar Makover, and it's really us," he says. "It focuses on chaos of the spirit. Feelings of confusion."

Some call him the "Arab 'Omer Adam [a popular Israeli artist]."

"It started with a cover I did of Omer Adam's Pa'am BaHayim ["Once in a Lifetime"]. People started to send me all sorts of [social media] stories of Omer was listening to it. He himself put the cover in his own story, and that started to spark interest among people in the industry. I turned out that I did another cover of an Omer song, and then I was interviewed in a few places and the headline was 'the Arab Omer Adam.' First of all, it was a compliment, because Omer is an amazing singer."

Asked what he thinks about the added word "Arab," he said, "In general, I think there's no need to categorize people. I'm here to make music, sing in Hebrew as well as Arabic, because that represents who I am: a Muslim Arab who lives in Beersheba. My Jewish friends never made me feel any different. I spoke Hebrew before I spoke Arabic. Sometimes I think in Hebrew, but I dream in Arabic.

"My parents raised me to think that we were no different from anyone else, and I never felt different. I went to a Jewish school and I never felt discrimination. I think it's a matter of what you project."


 
Last edited:

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
11,234
Reaction score
1,955
Points
290
Israel’s Future Lies in the Negev

A fresh look at David Ben-Gurion’s grand vision for the Jewish state

Israel’s future depends on the Negev. The founder of the State of Israel did not just emphasize this, he also justified it from various verses in the Bible. In contrast to others, who had their sights set on the center of the country, he believed in a future for the desert.
In his famous speech on the Significance of the Negev in January 1955 he confirms, by using the Bible, why Israel must be committed without compromise to the restoration and revegetation, or cultivation, of the desert. We at Israel Today translated his speech. In doing so we became aware that the term Negev in English translations of the Bible is often exchanged and translated differently, for example with “south,” or just “wasteland” or “desert,” whereby the spiritual and political value of this desert gets lost.

David Ben-Gurion redressed this in his speech and presented it chronologically. His speech begins with the words: “The Negev is the cradle for our nation; on the one hand it is a dangerous weak point for the country, but on…


 

rylah

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2015
Messages
11,234
Reaction score
1,955
Points
290
Michael Peretz, Avi Ben Yisrael and Yaniv Madar - Tzaholi Roni

A song written by Rabbi Ya'akov Abahtzeira for Shavu'ot.

 

New Posts

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Top