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CDZ What a lame reply...one more instance of asking me to trust him absent substance

320 Years of History

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Watch this at about 6:50.


A man asks Mr. Trump "...You want to repeal and replace Obamacare. What are you going to replace it with?" Mr. Trump's reply, "We're going to have great health insurance. We're going to bring the private sector in. We're going to take down the borders....We have lots of alternatives [to Obamacare]."

I have to admit I stopped listening by about 12:00 because Mr. Trump hadn't in the span of nearly five minutes answered the damn question! Okay, he wants to remove the borders. Is that all he wants to make different? If so, say so. Are there other aspect of the health care policy/program he wants to implement besides that? If so, what are they?

There are "a lot of alternatives." Well, what the heck are they, in your mind, Mr. Trump? At the very least, Mr. Trump could have identified two or three of them and stated a preference, or better still, a ranked preference among them.

Just how much longer are we supposed to put up with this man who (1) has zero political history (experience) to inform the electorate of his stance, (2) has in the past decade supported and opposed, advocated or rejected (or vice versa) lots of things great and small, and (3) who has promised to "do a great job on everything." Just how naive does he think the American people are? Or maybe the question is are the American people, in general, really so naive that they actually believe his vague and ambiguous bombast?
 

Rouge Rover

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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?
 

peach174

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What parts are you not wanting to hear here?

He said he wants to bring in the private sector, take down the boarders and have lots of alternatives.

That means talking to lots of people from the experts on down and using all ideas and then getting a Health Care system that works for everybody.
He does not have a crystal ball or something to tell everybody how that will become a health care program without everyone evolved in it first.
That means everyone, like it should have been, not the pick and choose favorites system that the AHCA was based on.

Not just the Health Insurance and Hospitals plus some pretty ridiculous regulations, like the Affordable Health Care Act is based on.
 
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You're just now finding out that he NEVER answers questions?

No. Not at all.

As I've said before, ever since Mr. Trump first announced he would run, I was optimistic that he'd make a good President. Like me, he's a successful businessman and I know what it takes to be that, but I know plenty of successful businessmen and businesswomen, and that success, in and of itself, doesn't mean they'd also be good Presidents. I have ever since been waiting for him to say enough stuff of substance that will convince me that my optimism is warranted.

Sadly, I keep seeing Mr. Trump give the kinds of answers I know he'd never accept from a subordinate or potential supplier, particularly to a question of the general sort he was asked re: with what he'd replace Obamacare. There is just no way in hell anyone would finds themselves in a boardroom or other business setting, and asked what X they suggest as the Y with which to replace it, would launch off talking about something entirely different. They'd answer the question or (1) be curtly told, upon heading down a tangential road, to get back on point, or (2) politely listened to, told "thank you," and not get any further (a bid accepted, an offer made, invitation to subsequent discussion, etc.) with their proposal/idea.

Mr. Trump has had more than ample time to come up with something substantive on policy matters. Certainly now that the Iowa caucus has occurred, he surely has no excuse for not sharing substantive ideas and platform proposals.
 
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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.
 

Rouge Rover

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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.

You and I both know Trump isn't the only one being less than specific about health care.
 
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320 Years of History

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What parts are you not wanting to hear here?

He said he wants to bring in the private sector, take down the boarders and have lots of alternatives.

That means talking to lots of people from the experts on down and using all ideas and then getting a Health Care system that works for everybody.
He does not have a crystal ball or something to tell everybody how that will become a health care program without everyone evolved in it first.
That means everyone, like it should have been, not the pick and choose favorites system that the AHCA was based on.

Not just the Health Insurance and Hospitals plus some pretty ridiculous regulations, like the Affordable Health Care Act is based on.

People who have nothing much in mind for next week speak instead about the next year or the prior lustrum.
― George F. Will, The Woven Figure: Conservatism and America's Fabric [adapted]​



In what universe does that response constitute a statement of what one wants to offer as a replacement for Obamacare?
  • The private sector is already involved...what sector do you think provides health care services most of the time for most people? What sector provided insurance for most people? If that's what he wants to do, he needs to be specific so we can understand clearly what "involve the private sector" means in his vision. That phrase means one thing to you, means nothing to me (it's too vague and ambiguous), and may mean something else to another person.
  • There are already lots of alternatives...alternatives in terms of insurers, alternatives in terms of care providers. That not withstanding, watch the video and you'll see that his remark about alternatives referred contextually to there being many alternatives to Obamacare, not to the provision of health care and sale of health insurance.
The "borders" he referred to is one specific aspect of Obamacare he wants to change. Okay; I get that. Is that all?


Red:
That's fine because he wasn't asked "how." He was asked "what" he'd replace O-care with. To answer that question, he need only have identified what provisions his health care policy/program would have. It may be that all he wants to do is remove the so-called "borders." If that's so, all he needed to do was say something like "I would change O-care by replacing the "borders." I think that's all that's needed to fix it." Instead he called O-care a disaster. Surely, thinking it's a disaster, Mr. Trump has more in mind than just replacing "borders." So why the hell couldn't he just tell the man (and the rest of us) what the hell else he wanted to change.


I can't be friends with a man who blows hot and cold with the same breath.
― Aesop, Aesop's Fables
 

JoeMoma

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Do any of the politicians really answer that type of question with detailed specifics. If they do, they are giving an answer that isn't going to happen.
 
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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.

You and I both know Trump isn't the only one being less than specific about health care.

We do both know that. We both also know he's the only one who has no past public service career that will give us any indication of what his core principles are on much of anything. Heck, Trump Organization isn't a public company so there aren't even 10-K statements to review to get a somewhat better understanding of his business management practices. All I really know about the man in a public sense is that he will do what it takes to make money.

Even there, I also know he's been bankrupt more than the average person could ever get away with. (Life After Bankruptcy | Investopedia) He's got the luxury of being personally wealthy enough that he can recover from bankruptcy and not have it be the end of his enterprises. Frankly, I'm even worried that he would drive the U.S.into bankruptcy, if only because at this point he may see it as a viable tool for some purpose.

Besides, what other billionaires went bankrupt? I don't really know, but I do know that I would sooner vote for a good number of them before I vote for Mr. Trump. By contrast, would you put your faith in any of Mr. Trump's billionaire brethren who've also gone bankrupt like these folks or these folks. You don't see Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, or Carl Icahn, Donald Bren, any Waltons, Kochs, or Mars on those two lists, do you?
 

Rouge Rover

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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.

You and I both know Trump isn't the only one being less than specific about health care.

We do both know that. We both also know he's the only one who has no past public service career that will give us any indication of what his core principles are on much of anything. Heck, Trump Organization isn't a public company so there aren't even 10-K statements to review to get a somewhat better understanding of his business management practices. All I really know about the man in a public sense is that he will do what it takes to make money.

Even there, I also know he's been bankrupt more than the average person could ever get away with. (Life After Bankruptcy | Investopedia) He's got the luxury of being personally wealthy enough that he can recover from bankruptcy and not have it be the end of his enterprises. Frankly, I'm even worried that he would drive the U.S.into bankruptcy, if only because at this point he may see it as a viable tool for some purpose.

Besides, what other billionaires went bankrupt? I don't really know, but I do know that I would sooner vote for a good number of them before I vote for Mr. Trump. By contrast, would you put your faith in any of Mr. Trump's billionaire brethren who've also gone bankrupt like these folks or these folks. You don't see Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, or Carl Icahn, Donald Bren, any Waltons, Kochs, or Mars on those two lists, do you?

Trump's past is an open book. He's a progressive liberal, for the most part, and he's for government involvement in health care.
 
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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.

You and I both know Trump isn't the only one being less than specific about health care.

We do both know that. We both also know he's the only one who has no past public service career that will give us any indication of what his core principles are on much of anything. Heck, Trump Organization isn't a public company so there aren't even 10-K statements to review to get a somewhat better understanding of his business management practices. All I really know about the man in a public sense is that he will do what it takes to make money.

Even there, I also know he's been bankrupt more than the average person could ever get away with. (Life After Bankruptcy | Investopedia) He's got the luxury of being personally wealthy enough that he can recover from bankruptcy and not have it be the end of his enterprises. Frankly, I'm even worried that he would drive the U.S.into bankruptcy, if only because at this point he may see it as a viable tool for some purpose.

Besides, what other billionaires went bankrupt? I don't really know, but I do know that I would sooner vote for a good number of them before I vote for Mr. Trump. By contrast, would you put your faith in any of Mr. Trump's billionaire brethren who've also gone bankrupt like these folks or these folks. You don't see Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, or Carl Icahn, Donald Bren, any Waltons, Kochs, or Mars on those two lists, do you?

Trump's past is an open book. He's a progressive liberal, for the most part, and he's for government involvement in health care.

Yes, I tend to agree with you on that. That he is, in light of that, running as a Republican, seriously calls his character, specifically his integrity, into question, at least for me. Of course, it also makes me wonder just how "blind" be his supporters. Seemingly they:
  • Don't have a clue about what Mr. Trump has for years advocated.
  • Just like him because he's a celebrity.
  • Will believe anyone is a conservative if they label themselves Republican.
  • Aren't in fact conservatives and are "infiltrating" the Republican party and don't really want a conservative to win the Republican nomination.
I'm not one of Mr. Trump's supporters, so I can't say what it is.
 

Rouge Rover

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I can't blame Trump on this issue because reform in this area is not entirely up to him. He'd have to have the support of Congress and he has no idea right now who's going to be there or if they'll support him. Why put an idea out there to be shredded when you don't even know if it's possible?

Really? As a "wanna be leader," he needs to be among the folks putting substantive ideas on the table. He wants my vote and that means I need to know what specifically he wants to do and how he would seek to do it.

You and I both know the man who asked the question knows he's not voting for an absolute monarch or even a prime minister. You, I and the rest of the nation know damn well that he may not be able to accomplish what he wants to because it requires Congress' collaboration to do so. That doesn't mean we should absolve him of putting his ideas out there for my consideration.

After all, Mr. Trump wasn't asked what he'd be able to get through Congress; he was asked what he would replace Obamacare with. That answer doesn't depend on Congress. It requires only that he have a clear idea of what he wants to implement, not how or when. Of course, from what I can tell, Mr. Trump only wants to do or say that which he thinks will right now get him votes, not what he actually believes is the right thing to do.

You and I both know Trump isn't the only one being less than specific about health care.

We do both know that. We both also know he's the only one who has no past public service career that will give us any indication of what his core principles are on much of anything. Heck, Trump Organization isn't a public company so there aren't even 10-K statements to review to get a somewhat better understanding of his business management practices. All I really know about the man in a public sense is that he will do what it takes to make money.

Even there, I also know he's been bankrupt more than the average person could ever get away with. (Life After Bankruptcy | Investopedia) He's got the luxury of being personally wealthy enough that he can recover from bankruptcy and not have it be the end of his enterprises. Frankly, I'm even worried that he would drive the U.S.into bankruptcy, if only because at this point he may see it as a viable tool for some purpose.

Besides, what other billionaires went bankrupt? I don't really know, but I do know that I would sooner vote for a good number of them before I vote for Mr. Trump. By contrast, would you put your faith in any of Mr. Trump's billionaire brethren who've also gone bankrupt like these folks or these folks. You don't see Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, or Carl Icahn, Donald Bren, any Waltons, Kochs, or Mars on those two lists, do you?

Trump's past is an open book. He's a progressive liberal, for the most part, and he's for government involvement in health care.

Yes, I tend to agree with you on that. That he is, in light of that, running as a Republican, seriously calls his character, specifically his integrity, into question, at least for me. Of course, it also makes me wonder just how "blind" be his supporters. Seemingly they:
  • Don't have a clue about what Mr. Trump has for years advocated.
  • Just like him because he's a celebrity.
  • Will believe anyone is a conservative if they label themselves Republican.
  • Aren't in fact conservatives and are "infiltrating" the Republican party and don't really want a conservative to win the Republican nomination.
I'm not one of Mr. Trump's supporters, so I can't say what it is.

I'm not a Trump supporter either but he is one of the three people I would vote for. Some people don't seem to be aware of his past positions but some are and they don't care because they want the outsider.
 

peach174

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What parts are you not wanting to hear here?

He said he wants to bring in the private sector, take down the boarders and have lots of alternatives.

That means talking to lots of people from the experts on down and using all ideas and then getting a Health Care system that works for everybody.
He does not have a crystal ball or something to tell everybody how that will become a health care program without everyone evolved in it first.
That means everyone, like it should have been, not the pick and choose favorites system that the AHCA was based on.

Not just the Health Insurance and Hospitals plus some pretty ridiculous regulations, like the Affordable Health Care Act is based on.

People who have nothing much in mind for next week speak instead about the next year or the prior lustrum.
― George F. Will, The Woven Figure: Conservatism and America's Fabric [adapted]​



In what universe does that response constitute a statement of what one wants to offer as a replacement for Obamacare?
  • The private sector is already involved...what sector do you think provides health care services most of the time for most people? What sector provided insurance for most people? If that's what he wants to do, he needs to be specific so we can understand clearly what "involve the private sector" means in his vision. That phrase means one thing to you, means nothing to me (it's too vague and ambiguous), and may mean something else to another person.
  • There are already lots of alternatives...alternatives in terms of insurers, alternatives in terms of care providers. That not withstanding, watch the video and you'll see that his remark about alternatives referred contextually to there being many alternatives to Obamacare, not to the provision of health care and sale of health insurance.
The "borders" he referred to is one specific aspect of Obamacare he wants to change. Okay; I get that. Is that all?


Red:
That's fine because he wasn't asked "how." He was asked "what" he'd replace O-care with. To answer that question, he need only have identified what provisions his health care policy/program would have. It may be that all he wants to do is remove the so-called "borders." If that's so, all he needed to do was say something like "I would change O-care by replacing the "borders." I think that's all that's needed to fix it." Instead he called O-care a disaster. Surely, thinking it's a disaster, Mr. Trump has more in mind than just replacing "borders." So why the hell couldn't he just tell the man (and the rest of us) what the hell else he wanted to change.


I can't be friends with a man who blows hot and cold with the same breath.
― Aesop, Aesop's Fables


It's better than the AHCA which congress did not read before they passed it.
 
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What parts are you not wanting to hear here?

He said he wants to bring in the private sector, take down the boarders and have lots of alternatives.

That means talking to lots of people from the experts on down and using all ideas and then getting a Health Care system that works for everybody.
He does not have a crystal ball or something to tell everybody how that will become a health care program without everyone evolved in it first.
That means everyone, like it should have been, not the pick and choose favorites system that the AHCA was based on.

Not just the Health Insurance and Hospitals plus some pretty ridiculous regulations, like the Affordable Health Care Act is based on.

People who have nothing much in mind for next week speak instead about the next year or the prior lustrum.
― George F. Will, The Woven Figure: Conservatism and America's Fabric [adapted]​



In what universe does that response constitute a statement of what one wants to offer as a replacement for Obamacare?
  • The private sector is already involved...what sector do you think provides health care services most of the time for most people? What sector provided insurance for most people? If that's what he wants to do, he needs to be specific so we can understand clearly what "involve the private sector" means in his vision. That phrase means one thing to you, means nothing to me (it's too vague and ambiguous), and may mean something else to another person.
  • There are already lots of alternatives...alternatives in terms of insurers, alternatives in terms of care providers. That not withstanding, watch the video and you'll see that his remark about alternatives referred contextually to there being many alternatives to Obamacare, not to the provision of health care and sale of health insurance.
The "borders" he referred to is one specific aspect of Obamacare he wants to change. Okay; I get that. Is that all?


Red:
That's fine because he wasn't asked "how." He was asked "what" he'd replace O-care with. To answer that question, he need only have identified what provisions his health care policy/program would have. It may be that all he wants to do is remove the so-called "borders." If that's so, all he needed to do was say something like "I would change O-care by replacing the "borders." I think that's all that's needed to fix it." Instead he called O-care a disaster. Surely, thinking it's a disaster, Mr. Trump has more in mind than just replacing "borders." So why the hell couldn't he just tell the man (and the rest of us) what the hell else he wanted to change.


I can't be friends with a man who blows hot and cold with the same breath.
― Aesop, Aesop's Fables


It's better than the AHCA which congress did not read before they passed it.


What "it?"
 
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I'm not a Trump supporter either but he is one of the three people I would vote for. Some people don't seem to be aware of his past positions but some are and they don't care because they want the outsider.

I'd vote for a write in candidate of my own specification before I vote for Mr. Trump. I'm sick and tired of waiting for that man to come up with some "meat" in his platform and talking points. That's even before I consider all the downsides associated with him and his past failures. The man has succeeded as much as he's failed it seems to me. That's not my idea of a "track record of success." I call that "throwing mud on the wall and seeing what sticks."
 

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I'm not a Trump supporter either but he is one of the three people I would vote for. Some people don't seem to be aware of his past positions but some are and they don't care because they want the outsider.

I'd vote for a write in candidate of my own specification before I vote for Mr. Trump. I'm sick and tired of waiting for that man to come up with some "meat" in his platform and talking points. That's even before I consider all the downsides associated with him and his past failures. The man has succeeded as much as he's failed it seems to me. That's not my idea of a "track record of success." I call that "throwing mud on the wall and seeing what sticks."

Trump is not perfect but who is? He's bombastic but it's working for him and I think he's a realist and probably one of the more reasonable people in the GOP field.
 
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Trump is not perfect but who is? He's bombastic but it's working for him and I think he's a realist and probably one of the more reasonable people in the GOP field.

At a cocktail or dinner party, I'd find his remarks entertaining and even stimulating for the sake of conversation. As a man asking for my vote, they are just empty. Such an individual needs more gravitas than is good fodder for party chit chat. Heck, I've heard more gravitas at myriad such parties. I'm a D.C. native, after all; politics is nearly always a topic at social events, be they swanky ones or just casual gatherings of family and close friends, and there is always a pretty good batch of folks of the various political persuasions, . It's unavoidable. Even the folks in the highly disadvantaged neighborhoods in which I mentor young kids talk politics.

Red:
Obviously nobody is. I don't require perfection. As goes the topic of the OP for this thread, really a direct answer would have been more than enough. Mr. Trump spend the majority of the time following the question talking about his paying for his campaign costs...as if that tell anyone what he will replace O-care with or how he'd change it.

Other:
As for his remarks about being self-funding. I understand fully that the point of that line is to establish himself as clearly not being a political insider, so to speak. Well, for many folks that may ring true, but the reality is Mr. Trump has for years been the very worst kind of insider. He's been the kind who used his money to "buy" the favor of folks who hold political power. He openly said so on several occasions.

I don't know about everyone else, but in my book, offering what amounts to a bribe is no better or worse than accepting one. The former shows a willingness to manipulate; the latter shows a willingness to be manipulated. I don't want to knowingly support (vocally, financially, or with my vote) either kind of person.

I don't care to do so unknowingly either, but if I look for clear evidence of it, which I do, and can't find it, there's not much for me to credibly think about it. And I'm talking about clear evidence, not hints and innuendo that may or may not be truly indicative of moral/ethical malfeasance or turpitude.

To illustrate the sort of integrity I'm talking about....Some years ago, I had an international telecom exec with whom I have been somewhat closely acquainted since college ask me to come in to do a study with the aim of showing that an initiative he wanted to implement would be cost effective. I asked him what if our research indicated it would not e cost effective. His reply was showing that it would be is what we were to do. I declined to take on the engagement. He found a competing firm to to the work and they found as he wanted. Five years later, he got ousted in large part because the initiative didn't meet its targeted financial objectives. I could have done the same thing my competitor did, and I and my firm would have collected tens of millions in fees, that is, until the client sued, which they did sue the other firm. And then where would my career have ended up? More importantly, how could I have lived with myself for such a lapse in integrity?

The situations and circumstances may differ in the course of a Presidency and Presidential campaign, but that's the level of integrity I expect of someone who asks me to vote for them. If they didn't exhibit it before asking for my vote, they had damn sure find it by the time they do.
 

Rouge Rover

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Trump is not perfect but who is? He's bombastic but it's working for him and I think he's a realist and probably one of the more reasonable people in the GOP field.

At a cocktail or dinner party, I'd find his remarks entertaining and even stimulating for the sake of conversation. As a man asking for my vote, they are just empty. Such an individual needs more gravitas than is good fodder for party chit chat. Heck, I've heard more gravitas at myriad such parties. I'm a D.C. native, after all; politics is nearly always a topic at social events, be they swanky ones or just casual gatherings of family and close friends, and there is always a pretty good batch of folks of the various political persuasions, . It's unavoidable. Even the folks in the highly disadvantaged neighborhoods in which I mentor young kids talk politics.

Red:
Obviously nobody is. I don't require perfection. As goes the topic of the OP for this thread, really a direct answer would have been more than enough. Mr. Trump spend the majority of the time following the question talking about his paying for his campaign costs...as if that tell anyone what he will replace O-care with or how he'd change it.

Other:
As for his remarks about being self-funding. I understand fully that the point of that line is to establish himself as clearly not being a political insider, so to speak. Well, for many folks that may ring true, but the reality is Mr. Trump has for years been the very worst kind of insider. He's been the kind who used his money to "buy" the favor of folks who hold political power. He openly said so on several occasions.

I don't know about everyone else, but in my book, offering what amounts to a bribe is no better or worse than accepting one. The former shows a willingness to manipulate; the latter shows a willingness to be manipulated. I don't want to knowingly support (vocally, financially, or with my vote) either kind of person.

I don't care to do so unknowingly either, but if I look for clear evidence of it, which I do, and can't find it, there's not much for me to credibly think about it. And I'm talking about clear evidence, not hints and innuendo that may or may not be truly indicative of moral/ethical malfeasance or turpitude.

To illustrate the sort of integrity I'm talking about....Some years ago, I had an international telecom exec with whom I have been somewhat closely acquainted since college ask me to come in to do a study with the aim of showing that an initiative he wanted to implement would be cost effective. I asked him what if our research indicated it would not e cost effective. His reply was showing that it would be is what we were to do. I declined to take on the engagement. He found a competing firm to to the work and they found as he wanted. Five years later, he got ousted in large part because the initiative didn't meet its targeted financial objectives. I could have done the same thing my competitor did, and I and my firm would have collected tens of millions in fees, that is, until the client sued, which they did sue the other firm. And then where would my career have ended up? More importantly, how could I have lived with myself for such a lapse in integrity?

The situations and circumstances may differ in the course of a Presidency and Presidential campaign, but that's the level of integrity I expect of someone who asks me to vote for them. If they didn't exhibit it before asking for my vote, they had damn sure find it by the time they do.

Actually Trump did give an answer. You've already analysed this with another poster. What he said was except for a couple of changes the ACA stays.
 
OP
320 Years of History

320 Years of History

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Trump is not perfect but who is? He's bombastic but it's working for him and I think he's a realist and probably one of the more reasonable people in the GOP field.

At a cocktail or dinner party, I'd find his remarks entertaining and even stimulating for the sake of conversation. As a man asking for my vote, they are just empty. Such an individual needs more gravitas than is good fodder for party chit chat. Heck, I've heard more gravitas at myriad such parties. I'm a D.C. native, after all; politics is nearly always a topic at social events, be they swanky ones or just casual gatherings of family and close friends, and there is always a pretty good batch of folks of the various political persuasions, . It's unavoidable. Even the folks in the highly disadvantaged neighborhoods in which I mentor young kids talk politics.

Red:
Obviously nobody is. I don't require perfection. As goes the topic of the OP for this thread, really a direct answer would have been more than enough. Mr. Trump spend the majority of the time following the question talking about his paying for his campaign costs...as if that tell anyone what he will replace O-care with or how he'd change it.

Other:
As for his remarks about being self-funding. I understand fully that the point of that line is to establish himself as clearly not being a political insider, so to speak. Well, for many folks that may ring true, but the reality is Mr. Trump has for years been the very worst kind of insider. He's been the kind who used his money to "buy" the favor of folks who hold political power. He openly said so on several occasions.

I don't know about everyone else, but in my book, offering what amounts to a bribe is no better or worse than accepting one. The former shows a willingness to manipulate; the latter shows a willingness to be manipulated. I don't want to knowingly support (vocally, financially, or with my vote) either kind of person.

I don't care to do so unknowingly either, but if I look for clear evidence of it, which I do, and can't find it, there's not much for me to credibly think about it. And I'm talking about clear evidence, not hints and innuendo that may or may not be truly indicative of moral/ethical malfeasance or turpitude.

To illustrate the sort of integrity I'm talking about....Some years ago, I had an international telecom exec with whom I have been somewhat closely acquainted since college ask me to come in to do a study with the aim of showing that an initiative he wanted to implement would be cost effective. I asked him what if our research indicated it would not e cost effective. His reply was showing that it would be is what we were to do. I declined to take on the engagement. He found a competing firm to to the work and they found as he wanted. Five years later, he got ousted in large part because the initiative didn't meet its targeted financial objectives. I could have done the same thing my competitor did, and I and my firm would have collected tens of millions in fees, that is, until the client sued, which they did sue the other firm. And then where would my career have ended up? More importantly, how could I have lived with myself for such a lapse in integrity?

The situations and circumstances may differ in the course of a Presidency and Presidential campaign, but that's the level of integrity I expect of someone who asks me to vote for them. If they didn't exhibit it before asking for my vote, they had damn sure find it by the time they do.

Actually Trump did give an answer. You've already analysed this with another poster. What he said was except for a couple of changes the ACA stays.

Perhaps I misheard the interview/conversation. I didn't hear Mr. Trump say ACA stays. Making one change hardly rings with tones of "disaster," which is what Mr. Trump did say. Indeed, Mr. Trump began his remarks with "I have been so against Obamacare from the beginning." Really, so against it that all he has to offer as a change or revamping is removing the "borders?" That's the only specific thing he identified that he'd alter.
 

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