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The ClayTaurus

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'of' is a preposition. He ended the sentence using a preposition. See? it's possible.
Incorrect. In his sentence, 'of' is an adverb.

There is no subject being linked.
 
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Incorrect. In his sentence, 'of' is an adverb.

There is no subject being linked.

The word 'of' is a preposition and is the last word he used in the sentence, Clay.


Here are more examples:

Where is my wallet at?
What do you need to go to the store for?
Which department is he in?

'of' adds NO significant meaning to the verb, thus is not a phrasal verb. It's just an unneccesary word, which is a preposition, and the last word in his sentence. Therfore, he ended his sentence using a preposition, followed by a period. That is the kind of impertinence up with which I shall not put.
 

The ClayTaurus

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The word 'of' is a preposition and is the last word he used in the sentence, Clay.


Here are more examples:

Where is my wallet at?
What do you need to go to the store for?
Which department is he in?

'of' adds NO significant meaning to the verb.
Incorrect.

I was incorrect to call them adverbs, I believe, but I am dead right that they are not prepositions.

Those words CAN BE prepositions, but in those sentences they are not.

A preposition REQUIRES a subject to follow.

By definition, if no subject follows, it is not a preposition; it's something else.



BEYOND all this, however, is the truth that this "rule" is tremendously outdated.
 
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dmp

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Here you go clay (holding your hand) - because you'll never believe me:

http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g30.html

Can I ever end a sentence with a preposition?

The word preposition (examples: at, in, of, to) is so named because such words normally precede the position of their objects in a prepositional phrase. Some people (The ClayTaurus) then took this definition to mean that a preposition always had to come before its object and could never end a sentence. Latin has a rule against ending a sentence with a preposition, but English has no such rule. If a sentence is unusually long, and the ending preposition will be a long distance from its object, then it is best to avoid ending with the preposition. It is sometimes preferable to avoid ending with a preposition, and sometimes it is preferable to end with a preposition. "Where are you from?" is more natural than, "From where are you?" As general practice, one should avoid ending a sentence with a preposition as a matter of style rather than grammar. If the sentence sounds good and clear and ends with a preposition, then go with it. On this subject, a story involving Winston Churchill is often told. When an editor dared to change a sentence of Churchill's that appeared to end inappropriately with a preposition, Churchill responded by writing to the editor, "This is the kind of impertinence up with which I shall not put." His purpose was to illustrate the awkwardness that can result from rigid adherence to the notion that prepositions at the end of sentences are always incorrect.
Emphasis mine.
 
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Incorrect.

I was incorrect to call them adverbs, I believe, but I am dead right that they are not prepositions.

Those words CAN BE prepositions, but in those sentences they are not.

A preposition REQUIRES a subject to follow.

By definition, if no subject follows, it is not a preposition; it's something else.
I'm correct, and my reply before this one illustrates that fact.

BEYOND all this, however, is the truth that this "rule" is tremendously outdated.
I didn't make the claim he broke a rule, however antiquated, I only noticed he did the deed. I said him using 'of' 'blew it' for me. It was a jest and a :poke: but rather than add to the discussion of the photo he processed, you thought it'd be more fun to take us on a grammar lesson.
 

The ClayTaurus

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I didn't make the claim he broke a rule, however antiquated, I only noticed he did the deed. I said him using 'of' 'blew it' for me. It was a jest and a :poke: but rather than add to the discussion of the photo he processed, you thought it'd be more fun to take us on a grammar lesson.
So sorry, D. I had no idea your jest and :poke: added to the discussion about the photo he processed. :rolleyes:

You're welcome to believe whatever antiquated rules you'd like. I promise I'll leave you alone about such things in the future.
 

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Jon: 'tis a lovely post processing job, one for which you should be proud of.

:D
 

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