The Dow will test 27,000 by April 16th

Camp

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Still below 25,000, and today is 23 May, 2018.
Yes, but gas is going up and reaching the highest prices in a long time. And milk has reached $6.00 a gallon.
WTF does that have to do with the subject of this thread? The OP had stated that the DOW would be pushing 27,000 by the 16th of last month. What does the price of gas and milk have to do with anything?
It was meant to put the importance of the DOW in perspective. The DOW has little to do with the economic conditions of average Americans when inflation of food and fuel is skyrocketing. And fuel and food are not used or included in calculating the national inflation rate.
 

ABikerSailor

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Still below 25,000, and today is 23 May, 2018.
Yes, but gas is going up and reaching the highest prices in a long time. And milk has reached $6.00 a gallon.
WTF does that have to do with the subject of this thread? The OP had stated that the DOW would be pushing 27,000 by the 16th of last month. What does the price of gas and milk have to do with anything?
It was meant to put the importance of the DOW in perspective. The DOW has little to do with the economic conditions of average Americans when inflation of food and fuel is skyrocketing. And fuel and food are not used or included in calculating the national inflation rate.
Apparently you didn't read the thread. The OP was claiming that because Trump is so great, that the Dow was going to be testing 27,000 by April 16th. And, we can clearly see that it hasn't. It may have gone up and been testing 27,000 if Trump hadn't done all that trade crap with China.
 

Camp

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Still below 25,000, and today is 23 May, 2018.
Yes, but gas is going up and reaching the highest prices in a long time. And milk has reached $6.00 a gallon.
WTF does that have to do with the subject of this thread? The OP had stated that the DOW would be pushing 27,000 by the 16th of last month. What does the price of gas and milk have to do with anything?
It was meant to put the importance of the DOW in perspective. The DOW has little to do with the economic conditions of average Americans when inflation of food and fuel is skyrocketing. And fuel and food are not used or included in calculating the national inflation rate.
Apparently you didn't read the thread. The OP was claiming that because Trump is so great, that the Dow was going to be testing 27,000 by April 16th. And, we can clearly see that it hasn't. It may have gone up and been testing 27,000 if Trump hadn't done all that trade crap with China.
I sometime find myself on the wrong side of the police. I guess I have found myself on the wrong side of the thread police.
 

Toddsterpatriot

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Still below 25,000, and today is 23 May, 2018.
Yes, but gas is going up and reaching the highest prices in a long time. And milk has reached $6.00 a gallon.
WTF does that have to do with the subject of this thread? The OP had stated that the DOW would be pushing 27,000 by the 16th of last month. What does the price of gas and milk have to do with anything?
It was meant to put the importance of the DOW in perspective. The DOW has little to do with the economic conditions of average Americans when inflation of food and fuel is skyrocketing. And fuel and food are not used or included in calculating the national inflation rate.

inflation of food and fuel is skyrocketing.

How much, over the last year?

And fuel and food are not used or included in calculating the national inflation rate.

Of course they are.

2. How is the CPI market basket determined?
The CPI market basket is developed from detailed expenditure information provided by families and individuals on what they actually bought. There is a time lag between the expenditure survey and its use in the CPI. For example, CPI data in 2016 and 2017 was based on data collected from the Consumer Expenditure Surveys for 2013 and 2014. In each of those years, about 24,000 consumers from around the country provided information each quarter on their spending habits in the interview survey. To collect information on frequently purchased items, such as food and personal care products, another 12,000 consumers in each of these years kept diaries listing everything they bought during a 2-week period.

Over the 2 year period, then, expenditure information came from approximately 24,000 weekly diaries and 48,000 quarterly interviews used to determine the importance, or weight, of the item categories in the CPI index structure.

11. How are CPI prices collected and reviewed?
BLS data collectors visit (in person or on the web) or call thousands of retail stores, service establishments, rental units, and doctors' offices, all over the United States to obtain information on the prices of the thousands of items used to track and measure price changes in the CPI. We record the prices of about 80,000 items each month, representing a scientifically selected sample of the prices paid by consumers for goods and services purchased.

During each call or visit, the data collector collects price data on a specific good or service that was precisely defined during an earlier visit. If the selected item is no longer available, or if there have been changes in the quality or quantity (for example, a 64-ounce container has been replaced by a 59-ounce container) of the good or service since the last time prices were collected, a new item is selected or the quality change in the current item is recorded.

Prices used to compute the CPI are collected during the entire month. CPI data is published monthly, with the index value representing an estimate of the price level for the month as a whole, rather than a specific date. Since certain prices, particular gasoline, might move sharply within a month, it is useful to understand the timing of price collection. A month is divided into three pricing periods, each period corresponding to roughly the first ten days, second ten days, or third ten days of the month.


Consumer Price Index Frequently Asked Questions : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
 

Muhammed

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Two simple arguments

Because the ten year treasury yield went down to 2.87% today at auction, all investment discounting techniques will also see the numerator stay more or less the same while the denominator shrinks. That in turn raises the value of equities

With total after tax wages going up for the nation as a whole more money will be fed into retirement accounts but some of that will be last minute additions more money in the market also means higher stock and bond prices..
Fuck you, dumbass.

Suck my dick some more.
 

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