Public School Forces Kids To Take the Bus Home When Walking Is Safer and Faster

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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You still haven't answered how my friend's wife died from your so called hoax!
I'm not a qualified medical examiner, and never had a chance to examine the body, but given the shenanigans that are known to have taken place with regard to claimed #CoronaHoax2020 deaths, I feel confident in saying that there is a 94% chance that she died of some other cause than the #CoronaHoax virus.

People like you need to locked up in a zoo to serve as bad examples for our children! You are insane.
This is the United States of America, not the Союз Советских Социалистических Республик. As much as tyrannic filth such as yourself wish otherwise, you don't get to classify people as having “sluggish schizophrenia”, and on that basis, lock them up or otherwise violate their rights; for refusing to submit to or play along with lies and abuses perpetrated by government.
Well, you are fucking wrong and need to just STFU, you poor excuse for a human being. You are dumber than a box of hammers!
 

meaner gene

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.
If you were a school principal, you would do the math and they say take the bus.

.

an average of seven school-age passengers are killed in school bus crashes each year,

.

According to Parents.com, almost 400 children aged 15 and under are killed yearly when struck by a vehicle.
 

Mad_Jack_Flint

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

Did you know schools are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students from the time they leave their front door until they return home? If something happened to those kid, the school would be held responsible. This is just another thing you amateur educators get wrong!
OMG HOW DID I SURVIVE HAVING TO WALK TO AND FROM SCHOOL FROM K-12?????

Like I said, only a moronic educator thinks packing kids into a bus during a pandemic against the wishes of parents is a great idea.

Shitforbrains.
What we did when we were young is no longer allowed by Public Schools and the rules would have to be changed.

You may disagree with the poster but they are correct that the School is responsible for the kid from the moment they leave that door until they return through that door...

Now you can call me all the names you want but until the parents demand change then that one parent will have to suffer...
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Well, you are fucking wrong…
I'm not going to be bothered that an ignorant, gullible cretin who is so abysmally stupid that he has fallen so hard for the #CoronaHoax2020, thinks that I am wrong.

You're basically a useful idiot on steroids.
You are a fucking moron of the highest order. You make liberals look smart.

Join my wonderful Hall of Stupid! Ignore is a gift because I won't be reading your incredible ignorance and pointing it out for the world to laugh wholeheartedly.
 

DGS49

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The assertion above by ART that the school district is legally responsible for the children traveling between home and school is - how can I say this - bullshit.

If the parents choose to have their kids walk home from school (or walk to school), even though a bus is available, that is the parents' choice. Should some unfortunate event befall the kids on the way home from school, the school WOULD NOT BE HELD LIABLE, except in case of a brain-dead jury ignoring a couple centuries of tort law and finding otherwise.

In order to be LIABLE, you have to be AT FAULT. Specifically, the School would have to be found to have breached a duty to the child by allowing the child to follow his parents' instructions. Total nonsense.

It is EXACTLY this sort of bogus argument that is used to justify a thousand different assaults on "our" freedoms by the Sovereign. They must be fought at every turn.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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The assertion above by ART that the school district is legally responsible for the children traveling between home and school is - how can I say this - bullshit.

If the parents choose to have their kids walk home from school (or walk to school), even though a bus is available, that is the parents' choice. Should some unfortunate event befall the kids on the way home from school, the school WOULD NOT BE HELD LIABLE, except in case of a brain-dead jury ignoring a couple centuries of tort law and finding otherwise.

In order to be LIABLE, you have to be AT FAULT. Specifically, the School would have to be found to have breached a duty to the child by allowing the child to follow his parents' instructions. Total nonsense.

It is EXACTLY this sort of bogus argument that is used to justify a thousand different assaults on "our" freedoms by the Sovereign. They must be fought at every turn.
Why are you so full of shit? I was a school administrator and have a Master's degree which requires a course in Educational Law. Now, let's hear about YOUR qualifications, other than being a dumbass.
 

AZrailwhale

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

Did you know schools are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students from the time they leave their front door until they return home? If something happened to those kid, the school would be held responsible. This is just another thing you amateur educators get wrong!
That's pretty odd since in most places parents are responsible to ensure that kids get to school. Very few places bus all their students to and from school. Maybe that is how it works where ever you live, but I went to school in Los Angeles California, Glendale California. Cincinnati Ohio and Walla Walla Washington and it didn't work that way in any of those cities. My daughter went to school in three different districts in California and that wasn't the way it worked there either.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

Did you know schools are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students from the time they leave their front door until they return home? If something happened to those kid, the school would be held responsible. This is just another thing you amateur educators get wrong!
That's pretty odd since in most places parents are responsible to ensure that kids get to school. Very few places bus all their students to and from school. Maybe that is how it works where ever you live, but I went to school in Los Angeles California, Glendale California. Cincinnati Ohio and Walla Walla Washington and it didn't work that way in any of those cities. My daughter went to school in three different districts in California and that wasn't the way it worked there either.

Your experiences don't matter. I am telling you why they have that policy.

Now, you can research it for your state or continue to be ignorant.

I'll bet you didn't know the policy because it never came up.
 

Bob Blaylock

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Why are you so full of shit? I was a school administrator and have a Master's degree which requires a course in Educational Law. Now, let's hear about YOUR qualifications, other than being a dumbass.
It's never a surprise when a corrupt petty bureaucrap argues in defense of outrageous usurpations and uabuses of power at the hands of corrupt bureaucraps like and including himself, and tries to argue that his position as such a bureaucrap and his education to prepare him for that position makes him somehow better than “the little people” whom he demands to roll over and submit to the corruption and abuses that he defends.
 

AZrailwhale

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

Did you know schools are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students from the time they leave their front door until they return home? If something happened to those kid, the school would be held responsible. This is just another thing you amateur educators get wrong!
That's pretty odd since in most places parents are responsible to ensure that kids get to school. Very few places bus all their students to and from school. Maybe that is how it works where ever you live, but I went to school in Los Angeles California, Glendale California. Cincinnati Ohio and Walla Walla Washington and it didn't work that way in any of those cities. My daughter went to school in three different districts in California and that wasn't the way it worked there either.

Your experiences don't matter. I am telling you why they have that policy.

Now, you can research it for your state or continue to be ignorant.

I'll bet you didn't know the policy because it never came up.
So you are telling me that your experience in ONE school district trumps my families experiences in three states and seven different districts. Oh by the way, my daughter's four kids don't get bussed either in Temecula California and didn't in Camarillo California (two different counties and districts) either and they are current students (or were before the lockdowns.
 

Dick Foster

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

I walked to and from school beginning with the first grade in VA and finished grammar and JH in NC. While I went to HS in SC my younger brothers both walked to and from grammar school. Sometimes a bus was an option but only if it was raining or really cold would I choose to ride. Perhaps the South has simply gone to shit since my leaving.
 

Bob Blaylock

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An odd memory from my childhood has been dislodged by this thread.

This is the neighborhood in which I grew up: Google Maps

My house was one of the few near the west end of Pintura Drive, on the north side of the street. When I started Kindergarten, there was a big walnut orchard filling up most of the space between Pintura and Cathedral Oaks. There was a big house/mansion on what is now shown as “Blueberry Hill Neighborhood Park”, and rumors of a nasty tempered old woman who lived there, with a shotgun, eager to shoot anyone who trespassed into her orchard.

To get between my house and school, I took a school bus that took me down Pintura, across La Ramada, up San Marcos, and along Cathedral Oaks, to get to Foothill School. That was the shortest way, back then, to get between these two locations.

I have a memory of one day, I must have been five or six years old, when I thought I had missed the bus, so I walked that entire route to school. I thought nothing of walking such a distance. That would have been some time in the late 1960s.


A few years later, I guess the old lady died, or moved away, and the former orchard was developed into housing. Ribera (which previously had its north end at Pintura), was extended all the way to Cathedral Oaks, making a much shorter route to school, and eliminating any perceived need for a school bus to serve my neighborhood. Blueberry Hill was opened up to the public, and for most of my childhood and youth, was a common place to find me. There used to be wreckage of the old house, but that mostly went away within a few years. The development of it into a much more formal park is a much more recent development, having taken place, I think, after I left the area in 2004. For most of the time that I knew the place, it was basically an undeveloped space, with any obvious hazards removed, but little formal maintenance. Lots of feral cacti and flowering plants, probably descended from those that were part of an orderly garden when there was still a house with someone living there.
 

Admiral Rockwell Tory

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Cram all the kids into a bus during a pandemic. Only public educators could think that’s a good idea.


Jessie Thompson's kids, ages 9, 10 and 11, would like to walk home together, but James H. Spann Elementary School in Summerville, South Carolina, won't let them leave without an adult.

When Thompson asked if she could sign some sort of waiver, the assistant principal told her: "Students will not be allowed to walk home by themselves." If an adult does not pick them up, the kids must take the bus. The bus ride actually takes longer than the 20 minute walk. Moreover, in the era of COVID-19, walking is arguably safer—and certainly more comfortable.

While other elementary schools in the area allow kids to walk home, Principal Shane Sanford put his foot down and the school district backed him up. In response, Thompson hired an attorney, Ashley Ameika, who wrote the district on October 14, imploring them to reverse course. The school has refused to change its policy.

Did you know schools are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students from the time they leave their front door until they return home? If something happened to those kid, the school would be held responsible. This is just another thing you amateur educators get wrong!
That's pretty odd since in most places parents are responsible to ensure that kids get to school. Very few places bus all their students to and from school. Maybe that is how it works where ever you live, but I went to school in Los Angeles California, Glendale California. Cincinnati Ohio and Walla Walla Washington and it didn't work that way in any of those cities. My daughter went to school in three different districts in California and that wasn't the way it worked there either.

Your experiences don't matter. I am telling you why they have that policy.

Now, you can research it for your state or continue to be ignorant.

I'll bet you didn't know the policy because it never came up.
So you are telling me that your experience in ONE school district trumps my families experiences in three states and seven different districts. Oh by the way, my daughter's four kids don't get bussed either in Temecula California and didn't in Camarillo California (two different counties and districts) either and they are current students (or were before the lockdowns.
One? I was a teacher and a school administrator in 7 districts and the DoD, located in two different states. I also have a Master's degree in Educational Leadership which qualifies me to be a school superintendent. You are questioning MY qualifications?
 

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