Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire

longknife

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The author is an NPR correspondent and her bias about how the economy is going is very clear in the title of her piece.

Statistics show that there may be more people like him in the near future. About 1 in 4 adults age 65 and older is now in the workforce. That number is expected to increase, making it the fastest-growing group of workers in the country.

Then follows a series of hard luck tales designed to back the negative part of the story’s title.

There is increasing evidence that having a sense of purpose pays dividends for older adults — for example, increasing longevity and reducing the risks of cognitive decline. But volunteering has another big payoff: The work of older volunteers has an economic value of more than $73 billion annually, according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Let’s face it. Once you get around all the leftist tripe presented by authors like this, there is a simple truth why people hesitate to “retire” today; it’s because we still have a lot of productive years ahead of us and don’t want to turn them away. We have years of experience and knowledge that we can profitably share with the world.

So, why should we curl up and prepare to die in some hidden away nook?

More of this story @ Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire
 

koshergrl

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Leftists would like to off their elders the minute they no longer contribute to their own personal wealth, and before those elders need any sort of contribution from teh worthless minions of satan that call themselves *progressives*. They're the same old nazis they've always been.
 

Dekster

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Boomer greed will never end until they draw their last breathe.
 

MarathonMike

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There are many different versions of retirement. Are you broke, are you rich? Are you healthy, are you a mess? Are you an introvert, are you very social? Do you have skills that are valuable to pass on to the next generation of workers in your field? Did you enjoy what you did, did you hate every day? I could go on and on. Retirement is different for each person.
 

Dogmaphobe

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I turn 65 in a month. I have no plans to require because I own my own business, I enjoy what I do, what I do is integral to who I am and I know enough about myself to realize that I don't want to lose something that is so important to me quite yet.
 

beautress

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The author is an NPR correspondent and her bias about how the economy is going is very clear in the title of her piece.

Statistics show that there may be more people like him in the near future. About 1 in 4 adults age 65 and older is now in the workforce. That number is expected to increase, making it the fastest-growing group of workers in the country.

Then follows a series of hard luck tales designed to back the negative part of the story’s title.

There is increasing evidence that having a sense of purpose pays dividends for older adults — for example, increasing longevity and reducing the risks of cognitive decline. But volunteering has another big payoff: The work of older volunteers has an economic value of more than $73 billion annually, according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Let’s face it. Once you get around all the leftist tripe presented by authors like this, there is a simple truth why people hesitate to “retire” today; it’s because we still have a lot of productive years ahead of us and don’t want to turn them away. We have years of experience and knowledge that we can profitably share with the world.

So, why should we curl up and prepare to die in some hidden away nook?

More of this story @ Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire
I retired when I was 63 because my fibromyalgia took its toll on my health, and moved back home to Texas to be near my sisters and brothers for the rest of my life. It was hard to leave my business, but I left it in good hands back in Wyoming, where they still run my quilt store and hopefully are still producing quilts for the community. Here, I just kept on making quilt tops for the Charity bees to quilt, because the sewing 3 layers together requires lifting quite a bit of weight around, and fibromyalgia, a muscular disease, is not particularly kind to muscles. So I just do what I can, and one year I had a banner year by making 110 quilts and donating most all of them to the local quilt guild here, where they sure had a lot of quilts to quilt that year. lol The next year we had lots to catch up on, but for some reason, my husband wasn't himself, and the doctor's diagnosis showed that he had dementia, and the specialist neurologist said his kind was due to a blow to the head early in life, which caused brain tissue to little by little, shed down away from the skull, and it was irreversible. So we did the best we could, but soon he became a little uncooperative and drove the car away until I had to hide the keys. He died in 2016. After the shock was over, which took about a year, I continued sewing quilt tops and still make 40 or 50 of them every year, but counting became tedious, so I make as many as I can and after collecting 4-10 of them, drop them off to the Charity Bees closet for later quilting. This year, I made 10 quilts to give to the great grandkids of my maintenance-man turned boyfriend, but he developed lung cancer and was gone in about 8 months after that. So I spent a few months doing those quilts and made them in fireman fabrics, because they grandfather had been a volunteer fireman for 44 years, and I wanted them to remember him for the hero and good guy that he was. This past weekend, I made quilt tops #6 and 7 for the little stack in the upstairs hallway destined for the quilt guild's bees who quilt them for a care center that helps young women keep their babies, have them, and then provide things from community groups like ours who make quilts, bibs, bags, diapers, and you name it from our crafty gals, and last year, in addition to my tops and others', the guild produced 140 quilts for charity. Some of them go to senior homes for wheelchair quilts, and the seniors love 'em. I make a few for adults every year, but because I bought so much baby and kid material, most of mine are still for the care center. It's fun. I won a state fair Best of Show in Wyoming's State fair in 1993, so as a personal goal, I try to make each top for a baby an object of beauty and fun for the kid that gets them and will grow up with that quilt. I make them the maximum quilt size for a baby bed, so they're all in the neighborhood of 35-45 inches wide and 45-72 inches long. All I care about is a lonely senior locked away in a nursing home or a fatherless infant has the most beautiful quilt that I can make with the scraps. I love what I do with all my heart, and while I'm sewing, I often pray and ask God to bless the little one or the lonely senior to know someone cares for them, and hope that they receive a color they love, well blended with other enhancement colors. But the heavy hitters, imho, are the girls who do that hard task of putting 3 layers together and quilting it such that their quilt lies flat and is smooth and pretty in every way. The other girls in the charity bees actually baste the tops to the batting and backing, and some of their work is no less than stunning.

Life is good when it has a purpose. The good book says that God's beloved are those who are loveless, children with no fathers, widows who have no partners, and elderly people who've been abandoned. I try my hardest to work for God's beloved. The book of Micah tells us to, and so did Jesus and his disciples. So I'm just doing my part, no more no less. It'd sure be nice to have a partner, I think to myself, but who'd want a life with someone who sews day and night? Prolly nobody. Fortunately, prayer life makes you happy if you give it a shot. :eusa_pray:
 
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initforme

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I have been retired for over 20 years....my only regret is I didn't retire earlier. I highly recommend it. If one has no hobbies I guess work is okay.
 

sparky

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The author is an NPR correspondent and her bias about how the economy is going is very clear in the title of her piece.

Statistics show that there may be more people like him in the near future. About 1 in 4 adults age 65 and older is now in the workforce. That number is expected to increase, making it the fastest-growing group of workers in the country.

Then follows a series of hard luck tales designed to back the negative part of the story’s title.

There is increasing evidence that having a sense of purpose pays dividends for older adults — for example, increasing longevity and reducing the risks of cognitive decline. But volunteering has another big payoff: The work of older volunteers has an economic value of more than $73 billion annually, according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Let’s face it. Once you get around all the leftist tripe presented by authors like this, there is a simple truth why people hesitate to “retire” today; it’s because we still have a lot of productive years ahead of us and don’t want to turn them away. We have years of experience and knowledge that we can profitably share with the world.

So, why should we curl up and prepare to die in some hidden away nook?

More of this story @ Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire

poppycock...boudlerdash...& guffaw .....

i could collect, but can't afford to

so i'm still working

do you honestly think i want to spend this winter in construction?

if so, i've a bridge for sale ...interested?

~S~
 

Camp

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Sometimes retirement can be based purely on luck. Everyone has circumstances that can impact the decision on when to retire.
I picked up a hobby of painting what was considered "modern art" when I was a young teen in Greenwich Village, NY. I hung out with all kinds of artists, some of which were kind of famous, although I didn't know it at the time. So, over the years I amassed a huge collection of paintings from my hobby. After about 35 years of painting and amassing my very large number of works, luck would bring recognition of my work. Suddenly my paintings and even my "Doodles" acquired financial value.
So, instead of being one of those folks who have to work long after and into retirement age, I ended up retiring at a cool beach resort town. My family will I think be selling my paintings long after I am gone because I am still producing them and adding to a still very large collection.
Luck, certain people saw my works and saw value in them, promoted them and introduced them to art collectors.
 

Deplorable Yankee

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I dont ever have to work aGain .... but I will ...I'm only in my early 50s

My old freight forwarder is still running his own huge business with his son and wife
He's 79....he could retire ...he doesnt want to
 

MarathonMike

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I turn 65 in a month. I have no plans to require because I own my own business, I enjoy what I do, what I do is integral to who I am and I know enough about myself to realize that I don't want to lose something that is so important to me quite yet.
That's great! In my own case I had a long career in engineering that was very rewarding but unlike you it was not integral to how I perceive myself. I have a wide range of interests and I enjoy being able to pursue them.
 

JBond

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The author is an NPR correspondent and her bias about how the economy is going is very clear in the title of her piece.

Statistics show that there may be more people like him in the near future. About 1 in 4 adults age 65 and older is now in the workforce. That number is expected to increase, making it the fastest-growing group of workers in the country.

Then follows a series of hard luck tales designed to back the negative part of the story’s title.

There is increasing evidence that having a sense of purpose pays dividends for older adults — for example, increasing longevity and reducing the risks of cognitive decline. But volunteering has another big payoff: The work of older volunteers has an economic value of more than $73 billion annually, according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Let’s face it. Once you get around all the leftist tripe presented by authors like this, there is a simple truth why people hesitate to “retire” today; it’s because we still have a lot of productive years ahead of us and don’t want to turn them away. We have years of experience and knowledge that we can profitably share with the world.

So, why should we curl up and prepare to die in some hidden away nook?

More of this story @ Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire
Two of my best employees are over 70 and will outwork most of the kids.
 

JBond

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The author is an NPR correspondent and her bias about how the economy is going is very clear in the title of her piece.

Statistics show that there may be more people like him in the near future. About 1 in 4 adults age 65 and older is now in the workforce. That number is expected to increase, making it the fastest-growing group of workers in the country.

Then follows a series of hard luck tales designed to back the negative part of the story’s title.

There is increasing evidence that having a sense of purpose pays dividends for older adults — for example, increasing longevity and reducing the risks of cognitive decline. But volunteering has another big payoff: The work of older volunteers has an economic value of more than $73 billion annually, according to the Corporation for National and Community Service.

Let’s face it. Once you get around all the leftist tripe presented by authors like this, there is a simple truth why people hesitate to “retire” today; it’s because we still have a lot of productive years ahead of us and don’t want to turn them away. We have years of experience and knowledge that we can profitably share with the world.

So, why should we curl up and prepare to die in some hidden away nook?

More of this story @ Older Americans Are Increasingly Unwilling — Or Unable — To Retire
I retired when I was 63 because my fibromyalgia took its toll on my health, and moved back home to Texas to be near my sisters and brothers for the rest of my life. It was hard to leave my business, but I left it in good hands back in Wyoming, where they still run my quilt store and hopefully are still producing quilts for the community. Here, I just kept on making quilt tops for the Charity bees to quilt, because the sewing 3 layers together requires lifting quite a bit of weight around, and fibromyalgia, a muscular disease, is not particularly kind to muscles. So I just do what I can, and one year I had a banner year by making 110 quilts and donating most all of them to the local quilt guild here, where they sure had a lot of quilts to quilt that year. lol The next year we had lots to catch up on, but for some reason, my husband wasn't himself, and the doctor's diagnosis showed that he had dementia, and the specialist neurologist said his kind was due to a blow to the head early in life, which caused brain tissue to little by little, shed down away from the skull, and it was irreversible. So we did the best we could, but soon he became a little uncooperative and drove the car away until I had to hide the keys. He died in 2016. After the shock was over, which took about a year, I continued sewing quilt tops and still make 40 or 50 of them every year, but counting became tedious, so I make as many as I can and after collecting 4-10 of them, drop them off to the Charity Bees closet for later quilting. This year, I made 10 quilts to give to the great grandkids of my maintenance-man turned boyfriend, but he developed lung cancer and was gone in about 8 months after that. So I spent a few months doing those quilts and made them in fireman fabrics, because they grandfather had been a volunteer fireman for 44 years, and I wanted them to remember him for the hero and good guy that he was. This past weekend, I made quilt tops #6 and 7 for the little stack in the upstairs hallway destined for the quilt guild's bees who quilt them for a care center that helps young women keep their babies, have them, and then provide things from community groups like ours who make quilts, bibs, bags, diapers, and you name it from our crafty gals, and last year, in addition to my tops and others', the guild produced 140 quilts for charity. Some of them go to senior homes for wheelchair quilts, and the seniors love 'em. I make a few for adults every year, but because I bought so much baby and kid material, most of mine are still for the care center. It's fun. I won a state fair Best of Show in Wyoming's State fair in 1993, so as a personal goal, I try to make each top for a baby an object of beauty and fun for the kid that gets them and will grow up with that quilt. I make them the maximum quilt size for a baby bed, so they're all in the neighborhood of 35-45 inches wide and 45-72 inches long. All I care about is a lonely senior locked away in a nursing home or a fatherless infant has the most beautiful quilt that I can make with the scraps. I love what I do with all my heart, and while I'm sewing, I often pray and ask God to bless the little one or the lonely senior to know someone cares for them, and hope that they receive a color they love, well blended with other enhancement colors. But the heavy hitters, imho, are the girls who do that hard task of putting 3 layers together and quilting it such that their quilt lies flat and is smooth and pretty in every way. The other girls in the charity bees actually baste the tops to the batting and backing, and some of their work is no less than stunning.

Life is good when it has a purpose. The good book says that God's beloved are those who are loveless, children with no fathers, widows who have no partners, and elderly people who've been abandoned. I try my hardest to work for God's beloved. The book of Micah tells us to, and so did Jesus and his disciples. So I'm just doing my part, no more no less. It'd sure be nice to have a partner, I think to myself, but who'd want a life with someone who sews day and night? Prolly nobody. Fortunately, prayer life makes you happy if you give it a shot. :eusa_pray:
I manage a business unit in Casper. Odd town, but I like it.
 

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