CDZ Is the U.S. like Germany in 1928?

gipper

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Our quasi Fascist economy certainly resembles Nazi Germany.
Interesting, what do you mean by that? I don't agree or disagree with you, just would like some elaboration on the topic.
Okay.

IMO our federal government and big corporations are one. They work together to advance their common interests, which is enriching themselves. Government protects big business and big business makes the payoffs to government. It’s a protection racket the Mafia can only dream of.

Is this not a soft form of fascism?
 

Correll

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
We’re making a subset of our population a scape goat for whatever societal ills are perceived. So much so we have violence against them and a large population that cheers the violence.

Very German like

I know. The constant bashing of whites by the media, pop culture, mainstream politicians, it is madness.



This thread is great!
Awwww. Isn't that precious. V@g-sore racist decrying the situation where he, despite being a complete loser, is no longer at the top of the societal chain based on nothing more than his white skin.

I said what I said. THe only reason for you to "restate" what I said, before you respond, is because you ar are to much of a pussy to address what I actually said.


As to your strawman, it has nothing to do with me. SO fuck off.
 
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jwoodie

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And if they sell the debt at a loss...so??
Devaluing the debt effectively raises the interest rates paid to replace it. We have been avoiding the consequences of our massive debt because of historically low interest rates. A rise to 5% on our $20 trillion debt would cost us $1 trillion a year in interest payments alone.
 

xyz

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Our quasi Fascist economy certainly resembles Nazi Germany.
Interesting, what do you mean by that? I don't agree or disagree with you, just would like some elaboration on the topic.
Okay.

IMO our federal government and big corporations are one. They work together to advance their common interests, which is enriching themselves. Government protects big business and big business makes the payoffs to government. It’s a protection racket the Mafia can only dream of.

Is this not a soft form of fascism?
Yeah, pretty much, private jails come to mind but there are many things.

However, that's just corrupt capitalism. In fascism, the government controls the corporations, not the other way around.

Examples of where the state can shut down businesses whenever it wants and make them do what it wants would be Nazi Germany, modern China and to some extent modern Russia.

In a real communist country, all the businesses are nationalized.
 

Staidhup

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If China were to unload their US debt securities their currency would tank, interest rates would rise, discounts from par would be overwhelming. The stock market would experience a massive flight from equities to fixed income. In short China would be the loser.
 
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jwoodie

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If China were to unload their US debt securities their currency would tank, interest rates would rise, discounts from par would be overwhelming. The stock market would experience a massive flight from equities to fixed income. In short China would be the loser.
What if China simply stopped buying
new U.S. debt instruments?
 

xyz

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I'm not sure how much the US could be like Germany in 1928. The US hasn't lost a world war and territory. Foreign interference in the elections is not really comparable..
 
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jwoodie

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I'm not sure how much the US could be like Germany in 1928. The US hasn't lost a world war and territory. Foreign interference in the elections is not really comparable..
The question is whether the U.S. could be facing a situation, like Germany was facing in 1928, wherein massive foreign debt could suddenly dry up overnight. Could we handle the fallout without serious damage to our political institutions?
 

M14 Shooter

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I'm not sure how much the US could be like Germany in 1928. The US hasn't lost a world war and territory. Foreign interference in the elections is not really comparable..
The question is whether the U.S. could be facing a situation, like Germany was facing in 1928, wherein massive foreign debt could suddenly dry up overnight. Could we handle the fallout without serious damage to our political institutions?
Yes.
>2/3 of federal spending is by choice, not necessity; the choice can be made to not spend it.
 

Third Party

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
Improbable
 

GLASNOST

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
Germany (the German population) suffered at the hand of those from abroad. The U.S. (the population) is suffering at the hand of its own government.

The rise of opposing political philosophies is as natural as seeking air to breath when your/mine/their problems are political. When you say ...
..... there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets ...
... I get the impression that you are blaming those for the problem rather than seeing them as the solution to the problem.
 

CHAZBUKOWSKI

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
We’re making a subset of our population a scape goat for whatever societal ills are perceived. So much so we have violence against them and a large population that cheers the violence.

Very German like

I know. The constant bashing of whites by the media, pop culture, mainstream politicians, it is madness.



This thread is great!
Awwww. Isn't that precious. V@g-sore racist decrying the situation where he, despite being a complete loser, is no longer at the top of the societal chain based on nothing more than his white skin.

I said what I said. THe only reason for you to "restate" what I said, before you respond, is because you ar are to much of a pussy to address what I actually said.


As to your strawman, it has nothing to do with me. SO fuck off.
And now, combine internet anger with being a v@g-sore racist, and you have have a complete and utter impotent loser.
 
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jwoodie

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Awwww. Isn't that precious. V@g-sore racist decrying the situation where he, despite being a complete loser, is no longer at the top of the societal chain based on nothing more than his white skin.
So is he no longer at the top of the societal chain because he is white, or is he still on top of the societal chain for reasons other than being white?
:290968001256257790-final:
 
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jwoodie

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When you say ...
..... there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets ...
... I get the impression that you are blaming those for the problem rather than seeing them as the solution to the problem.
What problem was solved by communists and fascists battling in the streets?
 

Correll

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
We’re making a subset of our population a scape goat for whatever societal ills are perceived. So much so we have violence against them and a large population that cheers the violence.

Very German like

I know. The constant bashing of whites by the media, pop culture, mainstream politicians, it is madness.



This thread is great!
Awwww. Isn't that precious. V@g-sore racist decrying the situation where he, despite being a complete loser, is no longer at the top of the societal chain based on nothing more than his white skin.

I said what I said. THe only reason for you to "restate" what I said, before you respond, is because you ar are to much of a pussy to address what I actually said.


As to your strawman, it has nothing to do with me. SO fuck off.
And now, combine internet anger with being a v@g-sore racist, and you have have a complete and utter impotent loser.


As this is the internet, the only way either of us can effect the other is either with stronger arguments, or being a troll.


My point about the constant bashing of white, by the media, ect. stands as a very strong point, that you have only be able to respond with, by being a troll.


IN this regard, you are the impotent loser, not me.
 

Bush92

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In 1928, Germany was experiencing a period of prosperity after recovering from WW1 and borrowing huge amounts of cash from the United States. Beneath this veneer, there was serious political turmoil as communists and fascists battled in the streets. Then the stock market crash of 1929 caused the U.S. to call in all of its loans and create an even greater economic depression in Germany, thereby destabilizing its government and paving the way to dictatorial rule.

Is the U.S. poised to repeat this experience? We too are experiencing a period of prosperity based on unsustainable borrowing from other countries, and also with an unprecedented level of political rancor and divisiveness.

What might happen if the world's economies all contracted and our public credit sources all dried up? Would our money be reduced to the value of wallpaper? Would our democratic institutions survive the ensuing public unrest?

Is this scenario completely improbable, or is it too horrible to contemplate?
Dumb.
 

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