Functional lung capacity test..dangerous?

irosie91

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It seems that the straining should be in your core not your head. Try to isolate the forcing to your mid section, that is where the residual air is, not up in your head.
marathon----don't quit your day job. I am not suggesting that spirometry is
going to induce an ANEURYSM----however the effects of forced expiration on
the PHYSIOLOGY of DA WHOLE DAMNED BODY----cannot be wished away with
silly words like "DO IT FROM YOUR CORE"
 

okfine

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess
After a major trauma surgery I was given a hand-held spirometer to take home. The idea is to inhale fresh air then exhaust your lungs to rid of germs and fluid to prevent infection. Especially if you're going to be down for awhile. Just don't overdo it till you get used to it. Builds up your lung power.
 
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Polishprince

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess

I'm 63, and have never done this test. Apparently, you are being asked to do this because of some specific complaint you have.

If you want to give the doctor the data on this, you have to do it .

Your alternative is to just deal with your own complaint in your own way
 
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T

ThisIsMe

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess

I'm 63, and have never done this test. Apparently, you are being asked to do this because of some specific complaint you have.

If you want to give the doctor the data on this, you have to do it .

Your alternative is to just deal with your own complaint in your own way
It's not a complaint, it's part of my yearly physical that I have to do.
 

okfine

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I guess you missed the part where I said I was concerned about the possibility of aneurism. I've heard the old stories of people who have been straining on the toilet and had a brain aneurism and died. This would be very similar if not worse than that.

Also, the pain that accompanies it is pretty bad
Since when is pushing out a stubborn turd anything like pushing out a deep breath?
It has to do with the strain, that's how I understand it anyway.
Meh....they do that after most major surgeries.
I've had 5 over the last 5 years....in my mind they were the pleasant part.
Try recuperating after cancer surgery,back surgery and three hip replacements,then you'll know what a challenge is.
Consider yourself lucky.
3 hip replacements?....holy shit!...
All on the same leg.
They botched the first one by leaving it an inch longer than the other. I called the surgeon on it and he said it would be just fine...:backpedal:
Two years later the back failed due to the F'd up hip job.
Off to surgery for the back.
Things were fine for awhile and all the pain came back.
Two back surgeons looked at my MRI and said things were fine there.
Off to a specialist on F'd up hip jobs....he assured me that was where my problem lay.
First surgery he only replaced the femur/ball part since the socket was well set. He warned this could lead to dislocations but it was less intrusive and worth the risk and I agreed.
Two weeks and two dislocations later and he went the distance and replaced the socket as well.
What a joyous couple of years.
Three hip replacements,two dislocations and fusing vertebrae 3 and 4.
Still using the walker but the back pain is gone.
He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding.
They cut me to the bone from 8 inches above the knee all the way to my waist band on the lower quarter of my thigh on circumference.
"He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding."

Did you start with pedaling or the evil chair?
 

HereWeGoAgain

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Since when is pushing out a stubborn turd anything like pushing out a deep breath?
It has to do with the strain, that's how I understand it anyway.
Meh....they do that after most major surgeries.
I've had 5 over the last 5 years....in my mind they were the pleasant part.
Try recuperating after cancer surgery,back surgery and three hip replacements,then you'll know what a challenge is.
Consider yourself lucky.
3 hip replacements?....holy shit!...
All on the same leg.
They botched the first one by leaving it an inch longer than the other. I called the surgeon on it and he said it would be just fine...:backpedal:
Two years later the back failed due to the F'd up hip job.
Off to surgery for the back.
Things were fine for awhile and all the pain came back.
Two back surgeons looked at my MRI and said things were fine there.
Off to a specialist on F'd up hip jobs....he assured me that was where my problem lay.
First surgery he only replaced the femur/ball part since the socket was well set. He warned this could lead to dislocations but it was less intrusive and worth the risk and I agreed.
Two weeks and two dislocations later and he went the distance and replaced the socket as well.
What a joyous couple of years.
Three hip replacements,two dislocations and fusing vertebrae 3 and 4.
Still using the walker but the back pain is gone.
He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding.
They cut me to the bone from 8 inches above the knee all the way to my waist band on the lower quarter of my thigh on circumference.
"He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding."

Did you start with pedaling or the evil chair?
I'm three weeks out and I still haven't started any real rehab other than Isometrics and walking using a walker. The damage from the two dislocations being the major cause.
I learned from the first attempt that trying to rehab while you still have surgical pain is a lost cause because you favor the damaged area so much it really doesnt do any good.

After my first replacement I was climbing stairs within the first week and didnt need any rehab to speak of.
 

okfine

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It has to do with the strain, that's how I understand it anyway.
Meh....they do that after most major surgeries.
I've had 5 over the last 5 years....in my mind they were the pleasant part.
Try recuperating after cancer surgery,back surgery and three hip replacements,then you'll know what a challenge is.
Consider yourself lucky.
3 hip replacements?....holy shit!...
All on the same leg.
They botched the first one by leaving it an inch longer than the other. I called the surgeon on it and he said it would be just fine...:backpedal:
Two years later the back failed due to the F'd up hip job.
Off to surgery for the back.
Things were fine for awhile and all the pain came back.
Two back surgeons looked at my MRI and said things were fine there.
Off to a specialist on F'd up hip jobs....he assured me that was where my problem lay.
First surgery he only replaced the femur/ball part since the socket was well set. He warned this could lead to dislocations but it was less intrusive and worth the risk and I agreed.
Two weeks and two dislocations later and he went the distance and replaced the socket as well.
What a joyous couple of years.
Three hip replacements,two dislocations and fusing vertebrae 3 and 4.
Still using the walker but the back pain is gone.
He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding.
They cut me to the bone from 8 inches above the knee all the way to my waist band on the lower quarter of my thigh on circumference.
"He warned me that rehab from the type of surgery I ended up needing was a mofo...and he wasnt kidding."

Did you start with pedaling or the evil chair?
I'm three weeks out and I still haven't started any real rehab other than Isometrics and walking using a walker. The damage from the two dislocations being the major cause.
I learned from the first attempt that trying to rehab while you still have surgical pain is a lost cause because you favor the damaged area so much it really doesnt do any good.

After my first replacement I was climbing stairs within the first week and didnt need any rehab to speak of.
I hear you on the favoring. I fought atrophy and swelling for months. Had to inject myself daily to prevent blood clotting. Thought I was ready for rehab and they sent me home. Two months later I went back and it was excruciating. It really sucked. Sometimes just normal activity is best. Hang in there. Good luck.
 

Polishprince

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess

I'm 63, and have never done this test. Apparently, you are being asked to do this because of some specific complaint you have.

If you want to give the doctor the data on this, you have to do it .

Your alternative is to just deal with your own complaint in your own way
It's not a complaint, it's part of my yearly physical that I have to do.

I wonder why they give you this as part of your annual physical? Is it due to the nature of your work? Are you a quality control/taste taster at a cigarette factory, and they want to make sure you aren't coming down with the emphysema?
 
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ThisIsMe

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess

I'm 63, and have never done this test. Apparently, you are being asked to do this because of some specific complaint you have.

If you want to give the doctor the data on this, you have to do it .

Your alternative is to just deal with your own complaint in your own way
It's not a complaint, it's part of my yearly physical that I have to do.

I wonder why they give you this as part of your annual physical? Is it due to the nature of your work? Are you a quality control/taste taster at a cigarette factory, and they want to make sure you aren't coming down with the emphysema?
I work with hazardous materials
 

Polishprince

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Need some medical advice on this. I can't seem to find any answers on the internet one way or another.

I've had to do this test about 3 times now, and I'm curious about how safe it is. Honestly, I dont feel it is safe at all.

For those who dont know what it is, the nurse has a plastic tube about an inch in diameter connected to a measuring machine. The procedure is to take a deep breath then put your mouth on the tube, you then forcefully exhale all of your breath, and then you have to keep pushing out every last bit of air you can, and you have to keep doing this for about 5 to 8 seconds.

5 to 8 seconds of having to try and keep pushing air out when you have exhausted all your air in the first forceful breath.

Needless to say, you are straining, your eyes start watering, all the blood and pressure goes to your head and your eyes feel like they are about to pop out.

During this process, because you are straining so hard, your head starts to hurt very badly and you get a little light headed as well. The nurse told me they have people do this sitting down just in case people pass out.

This has to be repeated 3 times, or as many as it takes to get the result they are looking for.

Here is my issue, how can the AMA, or any of the other medical boards consider this safe? With that much strain and pressure you are exerting, one would think there is a concern for popping blood vessels or aneurism in the brain.

Does anyone with medical knowledge have any input on this. It seems to me to be a very dangerous test, and there has to be another way of determining lung capacity.

Just curious I guess

I'm 63, and have never done this test. Apparently, you are being asked to do this because of some specific complaint you have.

If you want to give the doctor the data on this, you have to do it .

Your alternative is to just deal with your own complaint in your own way
It's not a complaint, it's part of my yearly physical that I have to do.

I wonder why they give you this as part of your annual physical? Is it due to the nature of your work? Are you a quality control/taste taster at a cigarette factory, and they want to make sure you aren't coming down with the emphysema?
I work with hazardous materials

That would explain your employer's interest in keeping up to date with your lung function.
 

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