Casting your own bullets

JGalt

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,192
Points
930
Location
SW Wisconsin
It was sunny and almost 60 degrees today, so I figured that I'd cast up a mess of bullets. I started with used wheel weights. You can get those from a tire store or a garage that works on tires. The place I get them from sells me a large 5-gallon bucket full for about $30. Wheel weights are just about perfect for rifle and pistol bullets. Most of them are 95.5% lead, 4% antimony (Sb), and .5% tin (Sn), but they can vary somewhat. Some bullet-casters have their own special recipes where they add some 60/40 solder, but straight wheel weights are good enough. These will cast bullets for pistols or rifles using modern-day smokeless powder, not for muzzle-loaders. For black powder guns, you need pure lead.

Something to watch out for is that some wheel weights are made of zinc. It is much harder than the usual wheel weights, and has a higher melting point. I(f you accidentally get a zinc wheel weight in your melting pot, it will screw up the whole batch. Zinc wheel have to be separated and discarded. I use a pair of pincers to test each one, as the lead/tin weights are soft enough that the pincers will nick them. They also have a dull sound when dropped on concrete, as opposed to the zinc ones, which "ring" when you drop them. The bottom-left image shows some zinc weights which were culled out...




Next I smelted down the wheel weights in a cast iron melting pot, and on a propane turkey fryer. It's always best to do this outside, and facing where the wind won't blow the smoke and fumes in your face. Wearing a mask also helps, because you don't want to breathe the particulate matter emanating from the melting pot,




Some tools you need are a cast iron ladle, a wooden spoon, and a slotted metal spoon or a metal spoon with holes in it. The slotted spoon is for removing the steel clips that were on the wheel weights, once they are melted. Also needed is either some small chunks of candle wax or better yet, beeswax. That would be needed to flux the melted wheels weights. Fluxing causes the lead and tin to mix and the slag to come to the top. A small (1/4" - 1/2") piece is placed in the mixture and is stirred with the wooden spoon. The spoon may turn to charcoal after awhile, but that's ok. Another method of purifying the mix is to use hardwood sawdust, but not pine. After the mix is melted, any slag can be skimmed off the top with the metal spoon.




The slag is thrown in a metal bucket, and the remaining mix can be ladled out, and poured into a mold. I use an old cast iron muffin mold that makes nice round 1-pound ingots.




Next I prepared the bullet mold. I used a double-cavity Lee #90309 mold that throws a .356" diameter 125 grain bullet, which can be used for 9mm handguns. The mold was first cleaned with some spray carburetor-cleaner to remove any oil or dirt. The insides of the bullet cavities are sooted by holding the mold over a candle. The black soot keeps the bullet from sticking. The only other lubrication is done after the mold is heated up, by touching a piece of candle or beeswax to the alignment pins inside the blocks, and to the sprue-cutter hinge screw. Care has to be taken not to allow any of the wax to flow into the bullet cavities, or else the cast bullets will have lines on the surface of them.

When the bullets are cast, a hardwood stick is used to knock the sprue-cutter open and then by thumping the opened mold with the stick, the bullets fall out into a pail of cold water with a towel in it. This hardens the bullets and cools them off.




I use a Lee bottom-pour lead melting pot that runs on 110VAC. The mold is heated by placing it on top of the pot. If the mold isn't warm enough it won't properly fill out. It the mold is too hot, the bullet will look "frosty."




The ideal temperature of the mix is around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit. It took me a few hours time, but I cast about 850 bullets.




Tomorrow I'll go through the next step, which is lubricating the bullets by tumbling them in some liquid Alox bullet lube, drying them in the sun, running them through a 9mm sizing die, then re-lubricating the bullets. It's a process, but good things take time. With everything shut down like this, time is one thing there's plenty of.
 

Deplorable Yankee

Platinum Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
6,945
Reaction score
2,464
Points
360
Location
DIXIE
Great post and a great skill to have indeed ...I'm not there on ammo ...making my own ...could be to late for me ...buckets of old tire balancing weights for dirt cheap ...brilliance!


Lots of smart people who have been screaming for years have been called tin foil hats for simply stating civilizations can turn on a dime ....overnight...they're lucky the trucks are still rolling andnthiers still fresh meat and a bounty of avacados on the shelves ...for now


lefties are gonna be the first to die ..most of em and most likely by other lefties....bullets or starvation ...will be the highest causes of death
 

Shawnee_b

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
3,207
Reaction score
1,570
Points
165
Location
South Central KY
Awesome, Good looking slugs. I haven't done it in a while but still have everything, lots molds!
 

Yarddog

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2014
Messages
10,695
Reaction score
2,932
Points
280
It was sunny and almost 60 degrees today, so I figured that I'd cast up a mess of bullets. I started with used wheel weights. You can get those from a tire store or a garage that works on tires. The place I get them from sells me a large 5-gallon bucket full for about $30. Wheel weights are just about perfect for rifle and pistol bullets. Most of them are 95.5% lead, 4% antimony (Sb), and .5% tin (Sn), but they can vary somewhat. Some bullet-casters have their own special recipes where they add some 60/40 solder, but straight wheel weights are good enough. These will cast bullets for pistols or rifles using modern-day smokeless powder, not for muzzle-loaders. For black powder guns, you need pure lead.

Something to watch out for is that some wheel weights are made of zinc. It is much harder than the usual wheel weights, and has a higher melting point. I(f you accidentally get a zinc wheel weight in your melting pot, it will screw up the whole batch. Zinc wheel have to be separated and discarded. I use a pair of pincers to test each one, as the lead/tin weights are soft enough that the pincers will nick them. They also have a dull sound when dropped on concrete, as opposed to the zinc ones, which "ring" when you drop them. The bottom-left image shows some zinc weights which were culled out...




Next I smelted down the wheel weights in a cast iron melting pot, and on a propane turkey fryer. It's always best to do this outside, and facing where the wind won't blow the smoke and fumes in your face. Wearing a mask also helps, because you don't want to breathe the particulate matter emanating from the melting pot,




Some tools you need are a cast iron ladle, a wooden spoon, and a slotted metal spoon or a metal spoon with holes in it. The slotted spoon is for removing the steel clips that were on the wheel weights, once they are melted. Also needed is either some small chunks of candle wax or better yet, beeswax. That would be needed to flux the melted wheels weights. Fluxing causes the lead and tin to mix and the slag to come to the top. A small (1/4" - 1/2") piece is placed in the mixture and is stirred with the wooden spoon. The spoon may turn to charcoal after awhile, but that's ok. Another method of purifying the mix is to use hardwood sawdust, but not pine. After the mix is melted, any slag can be skimmed off the top with the metal spoon.




The slag is thrown in a metal bucket, and the remaining mix can be ladled out, and poured into a mold. I use an old cast iron muffin mold that makes nice round 1-pound ingots.




Next I prepared the bullet mold. I used a double-cavity Lee #90309 mold that throws a .356" diameter 125 grain bullet, which can be used for 9mm handguns. The mold was first cleaned with some spray carburetor-cleaner to remove any oil or dirt. The insides of the bullet cavities are sooted by holding the mold over a candle. The black soot keeps the bullet from sticking. The only other lubrication is done after the mold is heated up, by touching a piece of candle or beeswax to the alignment pins inside the blocks, and to the sprue-cutter hinge screw. Care has to be taken not to allow any of the wax to flow into the bullet cavities, or else the cast bullets will have lines on the surface of them.

When the bullets are cast, a hardwood stick is used to knock the sprue-cutter open and then by thumping the opened mold with the stick, the bullets fall out into a pail of cold water with a towel in it. This hardens the bullets and cools them off.




I use a Lee bottom-pour lead melting pot that runs on 110VAC. The mold is heated by placing it on top of the pot. If the mold isn't warm enough it won't properly fill out. It the mold is too hot, the bullet will look "frosty."




The ideal temperature of the mix is around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit. It took me a few hours time, but I cast about 850 bullets.




Tomorrow I'll go through the next step, which is lubricating the bullets by tumbling them in some liquid Alox bullet lube, drying them in the sun, running them through a 9mm sizing die, then re-lubricating the bullets. It's a process, but good things take time. With everything shut down like this, time is one thing there's plenty of.


Expect a black helicopter now hovering over your back porch in the morning.
 

Tax Man

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2015
Messages
4,763
Reaction score
473
Points
170
Great post and a great skill to have indeed ...I'm not there on ammo ...making my own ...could be to late for me ...buckets of old tire balancing weights for dirt cheap ...brilliance!


Lots of smart people who have been screaming for years have been called tin foil hats for simply stating civilizations can turn on a dime ....overnight...they're lucky the trucks are still rolling andnthiers still fresh meat and a bounty of avacados on the shelves ...for now


lefties are gonna be the first to die ..most of em and most likely by other lefties....bullets or starvation ...will be the highest causes of death
Wrongers will be the largest count of dead.
 

HereWeGoAgain

Diamond Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
61,722
Reaction score
11,452
Points
2,060
Location
Fuck Y'all I'm From Texas!
Great post and a great skill to have indeed ...I'm not there on ammo ...making my own ...could be to late for me ...buckets of old tire balancing weights for dirt cheap ...brilliance!


Lots of smart people who have been screaming for years have been called tin foil hats for simply stating civilizations can turn on a dime ....overnight...they're lucky the trucks are still rolling andnthiers still fresh meat and a bounty of avacados on the shelves ...for now


lefties are gonna be the first to die ..most of em and most likely by other lefties....bullets or starvation ...will be the highest causes of death
Wrongers will be the largest count of dead.
Who owns most of the firearms?
 

Missourian

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2008
Messages
21,142
Reaction score
7,384
Points
350
Location
Missouri
JGalt great post.

I buy my lead alloy here...


I deliver them 47,000 pounds of lead ingots from St Louis from time to time...but their shipping is reasonable...$14 on 65 lbs.
 

Missourian

Platinum Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2008
Messages
21,142
Reaction score
7,384
Points
350
Location
Missouri
Great post and a great skill to have indeed ...I'm not there on ammo ...making my own ...could be to late for me ...buckets of old tire balancing weights for dirt cheap ...brilliance!


Lots of smart people who have been screaming for years have been called tin foil hats for simply stating civilizations can turn on a dime ....overnight...they're lucky the trucks are still rolling andnthiers still fresh meat and a bounty of avacados on the shelves ...for now


lefties are gonna be the first to die ..most of em and most likely by other lefties....bullets or starvation ...will be the highest causes of death
Wrongers will be the largest count of dead.
 
OP
JGalt

JGalt

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,192
Points
930
Location
SW Wisconsin
JGalt great post.

I buy my lead alloy here...


I deliver them 47,000 pounds of lead ingots from St Louis from time to time...but their shipping is reasonable...$14 on 65 lbs.
Awesome! I've used the Missouri Bullet Company's bullets before. Their quality control is good. There's a similar company called the "ACME Bullet Company" up here in Germantown, WI.

Acme Bullet Company - Wisconsin
 

Crixus

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
22,936
Reaction score
2,680
Points
290
Location
BFE Texas.
It was sunny and almost 60 degrees today, so I figured that I'd cast up a mess of bullets. I started with used wheel weights. You can get those from a tire store or a garage that works on tires. The place I get them from sells me a large 5-gallon bucket full for about $30. Wheel weights are just about perfect for rifle and pistol bullets. Most of them are 95.5% lead, 4% antimony (Sb), and .5% tin (Sn), but they can vary somewhat. Some bullet-casters have their own special recipes where they add some 60/40 solder, but straight wheel weights are good enough. These will cast bullets for pistols or rifles using modern-day smokeless powder, not for muzzle-loaders. For black powder guns, you need pure lead.

Something to watch out for is that some wheel weights are made of zinc. It is much harder than the usual wheel weights, and has a higher melting point. I(f you accidentally get a zinc wheel weight in your melting pot, it will screw up the whole batch. Zinc wheel have to be separated and discarded. I use a pair of pincers to test each one, as the lead/tin weights are soft enough that the pincers will nick them. They also have a dull sound when dropped on concrete, as opposed to the zinc ones, which "ring" when you drop them. The bottom-left image shows some zinc weights which were culled out...




Next I smelted down the wheel weights in a cast iron melting pot, and on a propane turkey fryer. It's always best to do this outside, and facing where the wind won't blow the smoke and fumes in your face. Wearing a mask also helps, because you don't want to breathe the particulate matter emanating from the melting pot,




Some tools you need are a cast iron ladle, a wooden spoon, and a slotted metal spoon or a metal spoon with holes in it. The slotted spoon is for removing the steel clips that were on the wheel weights, once they are melted. Also needed is either some small chunks of candle wax or better yet, beeswax. That would be needed to flux the melted wheels weights. Fluxing causes the lead and tin to mix and the slag to come to the top. A small (1/4" - 1/2") piece is placed in the mixture and is stirred with the wooden spoon. The spoon may turn to charcoal after awhile, but that's ok. Another method of purifying the mix is to use hardwood sawdust, but not pine. After the mix is melted, any slag can be skimmed off the top with the metal spoon.




The slag is thrown in a metal bucket, and the remaining mix can be ladled out, and poured into a mold. I use an old cast iron muffin mold that makes nice round 1-pound ingots.




Next I prepared the bullet mold. I used a double-cavity Lee #90309 mold that throws a .356" diameter 125 grain bullet, which can be used for 9mm handguns. The mold was first cleaned with some spray carburetor-cleaner to remove any oil or dirt. The insides of the bullet cavities are sooted by holding the mold over a candle. The black soot keeps the bullet from sticking. The only other lubrication is done after the mold is heated up, by touching a piece of candle or beeswax to the alignment pins inside the blocks, and to the sprue-cutter hinge screw. Care has to be taken not to allow any of the wax to flow into the bullet cavities, or else the cast bullets will have lines on the surface of them.

When the bullets are cast, a hardwood stick is used to knock the sprue-cutter open and then by thumping the opened mold with the stick, the bullets fall out into a pail of cold water with a towel in it. This hardens the bullets and cools them off.




I use a Lee bottom-pour lead melting pot that runs on 110VAC. The mold is heated by placing it on top of the pot. If the mold isn't warm enough it won't properly fill out. It the mold is too hot, the bullet will look "frosty."




The ideal temperature of the mix is around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit. It took me a few hours time, but I cast about 850 bullets.




Tomorrow I'll go through the next step, which is lubricating the bullets by tumbling them in some liquid Alox bullet lube, drying them in the sun, running them through a 9mm sizing die, then re-lubricating the bullets. It's a process, but good things take time. With everything shut down like this, time is one thing there's plenty of.

I used to own an old S&W model 10 that loved cast bullts. That gun loved cast bulet's from wheel weights.
 
OP
JGalt

JGalt

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,192
Points
930
Location
SW Wisconsin
It was sunny and almost 60 degrees today, so I figured that I'd cast up a mess of bullets. I started with used wheel weights. You can get those from a tire store or a garage that works on tires. The place I get them from sells me a large 5-gallon bucket full for about $30. Wheel weights are just about perfect for rifle and pistol bullets. Most of them are 95.5% lead, 4% antimony (Sb), and .5% tin (Sn), but they can vary somewhat. Some bullet-casters have their own special recipes where they add some 60/40 solder, but straight wheel weights are good enough. These will cast bullets for pistols or rifles using modern-day smokeless powder, not for muzzle-loaders. For black powder guns, you need pure lead.

Something to watch out for is that some wheel weights are made of zinc. It is much harder than the usual wheel weights, and has a higher melting point. I(f you accidentally get a zinc wheel weight in your melting pot, it will screw up the whole batch. Zinc wheel have to be separated and discarded. I use a pair of pincers to test each one, as the lead/tin weights are soft enough that the pincers will nick them. They also have a dull sound when dropped on concrete, as opposed to the zinc ones, which "ring" when you drop them. The bottom-left image shows some zinc weights which were culled out...




Next I smelted down the wheel weights in a cast iron melting pot, and on a propane turkey fryer. It's always best to do this outside, and facing where the wind won't blow the smoke and fumes in your face. Wearing a mask also helps, because you don't want to breathe the particulate matter emanating from the melting pot,




Some tools you need are a cast iron ladle, a wooden spoon, and a slotted metal spoon or a metal spoon with holes in it. The slotted spoon is for removing the steel clips that were on the wheel weights, once they are melted. Also needed is either some small chunks of candle wax or better yet, beeswax. That would be needed to flux the melted wheels weights. Fluxing causes the lead and tin to mix and the slag to come to the top. A small (1/4" - 1/2") piece is placed in the mixture and is stirred with the wooden spoon. The spoon may turn to charcoal after awhile, but that's ok. Another method of purifying the mix is to use hardwood sawdust, but not pine. After the mix is melted, any slag can be skimmed off the top with the metal spoon.




The slag is thrown in a metal bucket, and the remaining mix can be ladled out, and poured into a mold. I use an old cast iron muffin mold that makes nice round 1-pound ingots.




Next I prepared the bullet mold. I used a double-cavity Lee #90309 mold that throws a .356" diameter 125 grain bullet, which can be used for 9mm handguns. The mold was first cleaned with some spray carburetor-cleaner to remove any oil or dirt. The insides of the bullet cavities are sooted by holding the mold over a candle. The black soot keeps the bullet from sticking. The only other lubrication is done after the mold is heated up, by touching a piece of candle or beeswax to the alignment pins inside the blocks, and to the sprue-cutter hinge screw. Care has to be taken not to allow any of the wax to flow into the bullet cavities, or else the cast bullets will have lines on the surface of them.

When the bullets are cast, a hardwood stick is used to knock the sprue-cutter open and then by thumping the opened mold with the stick, the bullets fall out into a pail of cold water with a towel in it. This hardens the bullets and cools them off.




I use a Lee bottom-pour lead melting pot that runs on 110VAC. The mold is heated by placing it on top of the pot. If the mold isn't warm enough it won't properly fill out. It the mold is too hot, the bullet will look "frosty."




The ideal temperature of the mix is around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit. It took me a few hours time, but I cast about 850 bullets.




Tomorrow I'll go through the next step, which is lubricating the bullets by tumbling them in some liquid Alox bullet lube, drying them in the sun, running them through a 9mm sizing die, then re-lubricating the bullets. It's a process, but good things take time. With everything shut down like this, time is one thing there's plenty of.

I used to own an old S&W model 10 that loved cast bullts. That gun loved cast bulet's from wheel weights.
I love those old S&W Model 10's, they eat up cast bullets like they were candy. That's the pistol that got me started on handloading back in 1978. You could buy those for about $50 from other individuals. Nothing but a round front sight and a groove in the frame for a rear sight, but they were accurate as anything. Best shot I ever made with a Model 10 was a roll of toilet paper at 75 yards.
 

Crixus

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
22,936
Reaction score
2,680
Points
290
Location
BFE Texas.
It was sunny and almost 60 degrees today, so I figured that I'd cast up a mess of bullets. I started with used wheel weights. You can get those from a tire store or a garage that works on tires. The place I get them from sells me a large 5-gallon bucket full for about $30. Wheel weights are just about perfect for rifle and pistol bullets. Most of them are 95.5% lead, 4% antimony (Sb), and .5% tin (Sn), but they can vary somewhat. Some bullet-casters have their own special recipes where they add some 60/40 solder, but straight wheel weights are good enough. These will cast bullets for pistols or rifles using modern-day smokeless powder, not for muzzle-loaders. For black powder guns, you need pure lead.

Something to watch out for is that some wheel weights are made of zinc. It is much harder than the usual wheel weights, and has a higher melting point. I(f you accidentally get a zinc wheel weight in your melting pot, it will screw up the whole batch. Zinc wheel have to be separated and discarded. I use a pair of pincers to test each one, as the lead/tin weights are soft enough that the pincers will nick them. They also have a dull sound when dropped on concrete, as opposed to the zinc ones, which "ring" when you drop them. The bottom-left image shows some zinc weights which were culled out...




Next I smelted down the wheel weights in a cast iron melting pot, and on a propane turkey fryer. It's always best to do this outside, and facing where the wind won't blow the smoke and fumes in your face. Wearing a mask also helps, because you don't want to breathe the particulate matter emanating from the melting pot,




Some tools you need are a cast iron ladle, a wooden spoon, and a slotted metal spoon or a metal spoon with holes in it. The slotted spoon is for removing the steel clips that were on the wheel weights, once they are melted. Also needed is either some small chunks of candle wax or better yet, beeswax. That would be needed to flux the melted wheels weights. Fluxing causes the lead and tin to mix and the slag to come to the top. A small (1/4" - 1/2") piece is placed in the mixture and is stirred with the wooden spoon. The spoon may turn to charcoal after awhile, but that's ok. Another method of purifying the mix is to use hardwood sawdust, but not pine. After the mix is melted, any slag can be skimmed off the top with the metal spoon.




The slag is thrown in a metal bucket, and the remaining mix can be ladled out, and poured into a mold. I use an old cast iron muffin mold that makes nice round 1-pound ingots.




Next I prepared the bullet mold. I used a double-cavity Lee #90309 mold that throws a .356" diameter 125 grain bullet, which can be used for 9mm handguns. The mold was first cleaned with some spray carburetor-cleaner to remove any oil or dirt. The insides of the bullet cavities are sooted by holding the mold over a candle. The black soot keeps the bullet from sticking. The only other lubrication is done after the mold is heated up, by touching a piece of candle or beeswax to the alignment pins inside the blocks, and to the sprue-cutter hinge screw. Care has to be taken not to allow any of the wax to flow into the bullet cavities, or else the cast bullets will have lines on the surface of them.

When the bullets are cast, a hardwood stick is used to knock the sprue-cutter open and then by thumping the opened mold with the stick, the bullets fall out into a pail of cold water with a towel in it. This hardens the bullets and cools them off.




I use a Lee bottom-pour lead melting pot that runs on 110VAC. The mold is heated by placing it on top of the pot. If the mold isn't warm enough it won't properly fill out. It the mold is too hot, the bullet will look "frosty."




The ideal temperature of the mix is around 600-650 degrees Fahrenheit. It took me a few hours time, but I cast about 850 bullets.




Tomorrow I'll go through the next step, which is lubricating the bullets by tumbling them in some liquid Alox bullet lube, drying them in the sun, running them through a 9mm sizing die, then re-lubricating the bullets. It's a process, but good things take time. With everything shut down like this, time is one thing there's plenty of.

I used to own an old S&W model 10 that loved cast bullts. That gun loved cast bulet's from wheel weights.
I love those old S&W Model 10's, they eat up cast bullets like they were candy. That's the pistol that got me started on handloading back in 1978. You could buy those for about $50 from other individuals. Nothing but a round front sight and a groove in the frame for a rear sight, but they were accurate as anything. Best shot I ever made with a Model 10 was a roll of toilet paper at 75 yards.

Mine was a hand me down. A friend of my dads got it from one of those places that sells old police guns. Mine was marked LAPD. I literally shot that gun until it broke. One thing I loved to do was stuff ear plugs into primed brass and shoot cans. My kids loved it. zero recoil and loud as hell.
 

Shawnee_b

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
3,207
Reaction score
1,570
Points
165
Location
South Central KY
Dead nutz on too. I can shoot a fly off a liberals ass at 600 yards with it. Or miss, whatever, still counts :)
 
OP
JGalt

JGalt

Platinum Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2011
Messages
29,050
Reaction score
9,192
Points
930
Location
SW Wisconsin
Next step: Sizing and lubricating the bullets. What I use is liquid Alox, which is a mixture of beeswax, other waxes, and mineral spirits. The bullets are tumbled in a little of this, in a container, then spread out to dry. A better way to lubricate bullets is if you can afford something like an RCBS Lube-A-Matic press, which forces the bullets through a lube stick. But I'm cheap, so this works just as well.




Next comes the bullet sizing. That's where they're pushed through a sizing die, so each one measures the same uniform .356" in diameter.




After sizing all of them. I decided to measure the hardness of a few of them. Metal hardness is measured on the Brinell scale: The lower the number, the softer the metal. Measuring the hardness involves taking a couple samples and filing a flat spot on one side. The bullet is then placed on the press where a tiny indentation is made. When viewed through a graduated microscope, the diameter of the impression relates to the hardness of the metal. That measurement is looked up on a chart, which gives the Brinell hardness (BHN) and the maximum operating pressure of the bullet..



The samples I measured showed them to have a Brinell hardness that averaged BHN 23. That allows for a maximum working pressure of about 30,000 PSI. Pure lead has a BHN number of 5, which is too soft for the high pressure developed in a chamber using modern-day smokeless powder.



Once the bullets have been sized, they're tumbled in Alox one more time, and allowed to dry overnight. After that, they're ready to be used.



I've driven these cast bullets up to 1056 fps with 4.2 grains of HP-38, with no noticeable leading in the bore. They shoot pretty tight at 3.9 grains, and a velocity of 990 fps. They can't be used in a Glock though, because their polygonal rifling tends to lead up fast, and can build up dangerous pressure.
 
Last edited:

Most reactions - Past 7 days

Forum List

Top