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Canada's lost Vikings revealed

Gracie

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Another good reason to kick Columbus Day to the curb.
Viking Day would be much more fun.
 

westwall

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There is also some evidence suggesting a Celtic colony, here in North America, 1000 years before Christ.
 
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longknife

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There is also some evidence suggesting a Celtic colony, here in North America, 1000 years before Christ.
That wouldn't surprise me. Few understand just how big and influential the Celtic Empire was.
 

whitehall

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Vikings landed in Canada and Columbus landed in the Caribbian islands. Columbus established (for good or bad) a viable civilization. The Vikings abandoned the New World and left a couple of pitiful stone walls when there wasn't anybody around to murder or pillage.
 

westwall

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Vikings landed in Canada and Columbus landed in the Caribbian islands. Columbus established (for good or bad) a viable civilization. The Vikings abandoned the New World and left a couple of pitiful stone walls when there wasn't anybody around to murder or pillage.






The Vikings were there for 500 years. You need to read something other than BS progressive propaganda.
 

waltky

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Vikings in the Americas...

New evidence of Viking life in America?
Thu, 31 Mar 2016 - The discovery that reveals they may have colonised America
A new discovery has revealed that the Vikings may have travelled hundreds of miles further into North America than previously thought. It's well known that they reached the tip of the continent more than 1,000 years ago, but the full extent of their exploration has remained a mystery, writes historian Dan Snow. After a long hike across boggy ground and through thick pine forests, clutching pepper spray to protect against bear attacks, Sarah Parcak and her small team of archaeologists stood on an exposed, wind-blasted headland in North America.

Exhausted but happy, they had been led to Point Rosee in Newfoundland by the most high-tech weaponry in the modern archaeological arsenal - satellite data captured 383 miles (600km) above the Earth. But once here they were back to using trowels and brushes. I joined them to see how this powerful combination of new and old allowed them to make what could be a seismic discovery. We were here on the trail of one of the greatest maritime cultures of all time. We were here inspired by ancient chronicles which many have written off as fairy stories. We were here looking for Vikings.


In about 800AD Britain felt the fury of these men from the north. Portmahomack was one of Scotland's most prosperous and important communities. On a protected bay in Easter Ross, on the edge of the Highlands, it was well placed as a waypoint for merchants, travellers and pilgrims moving along the east coast. Recent excavations have given us a picture of a wealthy monastery at its heart. Scriptures were copied on to carefully prepared animal skin parchment by monks, skilled craftsmen created beautiful, jewel-encrusted religious ornaments, sculptors carved intricate Celtic crosses. Trade was the source of these riches, the sea brought wealth, but the sea also brought destruction.

Archaeologists have revealed that Portmahomack was suddenly and utterly destroyed. They found smashed fragments of sculptures mingled with the ashes of torched buildings. The settlement was wiped out. It is impossible to be certain but historians now think the most likely explanation is that it was attacked and looted. When I visited, a couple of months before the trip to Point Rosee, I held a piece of skull in my hand, presumably from a monk. It had been shattered by a mighty blow, the sword's blade left a deep gouge that makes the cause of death clear. Who were these men who slaughtered God's servants and annihilated one of the oldest Christian sites in Britain? Almost certainly they were men who cared nothing for the Christian God, men who came in ships from the north and west, men who sought gold: Vikings.

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westwall

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Yes, 1,000
There are structures, proven to be Viking, in Canada from 1,000 years ago.
viking structures in canada from 1 000 years ago - Google Search






Yeah, that's old news. Really old news.
Yes, 1,000years or so.




Yeah? So? Like I said, it is old news to people who study history. There is also some pretty good evidence that there was a Celtic colony here in the new world that existed for hundreds of years, over one thousand years before Christ. Like I said, if you actually study history it becomes quite plain that man has always traveled a lot. And the weather we have today is mild compared to what they had to endure.
 

waltky

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Uncle Ferd says the reason Vikings were such good sailors is `cause dey was ScandiNAVYans...

Walrus bones provide clues to mystery of lost Viking colony
Aug. 8, 2018 | WASHINGTON – Clues to the mystery of why Viking colonies in Greenland flourished and fell have been found in the DNA of medieval walrus bones housed in more than a dozen European museums.

For almost 500 years, the Norse descendants of Erik the Red built churches and manor homes and expanded their settlements on the icy fringes of European civilization. On Greenland, they had elaborate stone churches with bronze bells and stained glass, a monastery, and their own bishop. Their colonies at one time supported more than 2,000 people. And then they vanished. Scholars have long wondered why. “Why did they flourish and why did they disappear?” asked Thomas McGovern, an anthropologist at Hunter College in New York. “And did their greatest success also contain the seeds of their demise?”

Researchers who visited museums across western Europe to assemble a rare pile of artifacts – fragments of medieval walrus skulls – reported in a study in Wednesday’s Proceedings of the Royal Society B that the fate of these medieval outposts may have been tied to the demand for walrus ivory among rich Europeans. The study revealed that during the height of the Norse settlement – from about 1120 to 1400 – at least 80 percent of the walrus samples were directly sourced from Greenland. “It’s possible that almost all the walrus ivory in western Europe during the High Middle Ages came from Greenland,” said Bastiaan Star, a scientist at the University of Oslo and one of the study’s authors. “This result tells a very clear story.”


A dozen years ago, many historians believed that the changing climate of medieval Europe was the main reason Norse settlements in Greenland expanded and went extinct. This view was popularized in Jared Diamond’s 2005 book “Collapse.” But evidence such as walrus bones at archaeological sites in Greenland and historical documents – including church records of tithes paid in walrus tusks – suggested another possible factor: that the Vikings’ descendants thrived on a lucrative trade in walrus tusks, which were sold to Europe’s elite and carved into luxury items, such as ivory crucifixes, knife handles, and fancy dice and chess sets. Archaeologists suspected that famous ivory artifacts from the Middle Ages – such as the Lewis Chessmen , a set of expressive and intricately carved statuettes from the 12th century now housed in the British Museum in London – were made from walrus tusks from Greenland. But they could not get permission to bore into these precious artifacts for genetic analysis.

James Barrett, another study author and an archaeologist at the University of Cambridge, was “opening dusty boxes and poring through museum catalogues” in galleries in Norway, France, Germany, Ireland, and the UK when he realized that the tusks were often sold attached to fragments of walrus skulls – and that the bone could provide the DNA he needed. Barrett didn’t get access to the Lewis Chessmen, but his hunt produced 23 medieval artifacts for analysis, after examining hundreds of related objects. “This is the first study that conclusively shows that Greenland walrus exports obtained a near-monopoly in Europe,” said Poul Holm, an environmental historian at Trinity College in Dublin, who was not involved in the study. McGovern, also not part of the study, said of the research: “It’s changing the story that we’ve been telling for years.”

If walrus ivory was the key to Greenland’s medieval wealth, experts now suspect a collapsing market for the ivory may have helped doom the outposts. The Norse Greenland settlements vanished in the 1400s, sometime after life in continental Europe was badly rattled by the onset of the Black Death and the beginning of the Little Ice Age, an era of cooler climates. These calamities undermined demand for walrus ivory, said Barrett. After “a bonanza tied to the novelty of bringing exotic products to the market” in Europe, Holm said, “the fading allure of the product locks the society in decline.”

Walrus bones provide clues to mystery of lost Viking colony
 

TrueTT

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Vikings were unrepentant in their hostility and brutality towards Christianized Europeans. Nothing to celebrate there.

That said, this is really interesting. I've been to the Maritime provinces in Canada on several occasions- this will be a nice point of reference/interest to be inclined for another trip haha.
 

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