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Border wars and beyond

LilOlLady

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BORDER WARS AND BEYOND

When 20 million foreigners invade and occupy a country, kill and rape it’s men, women and children, steal and pillage and kill those whose job is to protect this country it is an act and declaration of war and we need to meet force with like force. We need to the U.S. Military, not border patrols, ICE and local law enforcement to “solve” the problem because they are train to do it and they need to go business to business and house to house.

The biggest threat to this country is not the Taliban and Al Qaeda but the hard working illegal aliens who only want a better life for they families who are destroying America and killing more Americans and costing more than 9-11 are the two ongoing wars.

Drug smugglers ARE the hard working illegal aliens who just want a better life for their families. ItÂ’s just that drug smuggling and drug dealing pays more than picking lettuce or flipping hamburgers at McDonalds. How do you think illegal aliens working at McDonalds drives Lexus and Escalades and babies wear designer clothes and have cell phones.

If you are not aware of this, then you have your heads in your asses like our leaders. Is this how illegal aliens contribute to our economy?
 
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OP
LilOlLady

LilOlLady

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Jan Brewer: Most Illegal Immigrants Are Smuggling Drugs
PAUL DAVENPORT
06/25/10

"Traditionally, migrants have always been needy, humble people who in good faith go looking for a way to better the lives of their families," Ramon Valdes said.

A Border Patrol spokesman said illegal immigrants do sometimes carry drugs across the border, but he said he couldn't provide numbers because smugglers are turned over to prosecutors.

Jan Brewer: Most Illegal Immigrants Are Smuggling Drugs

That was then and this is now. Things are different now. Illegal aliens are use to smuggle and deal drugs because they have found it pays more than picking lettuce.
 

Douger

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Not fucking there !
Lets declare a war on drugs !
Oh wait...............
 

Russell

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Cross the border into Iraq and you get 10 years hard labor, if you are lucky.
Cross the border into North Korea and you get 15 years hard labor, if you are lucky.
Cross the border into the USA and corrupt politicians support you at tax payer expense.
 
OP
LilOlLady

LilOlLady

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Cross the border into Iraq and you get 10 years hard labor, if you are lucky.
Cross the border into North Korea and you get 15 years hard labor, if you are lucky.
Cross the border into the USA and corrupt politicians support you at tax payer expense.

Cross the border into Iran?
 

Russell

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Cross the border into Iran? And you get fined by Haliburton - just ask president Chaney!
 

JMadison

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Cross the border into Iran? And you get fined by Haliburton - just ask president Chaney!
Why, when we can ask a moron like you.
 

Russell

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JMad,
Obviously you work for Haliburton... which moved its headquarters to Dubai to shield itself from the outrage of "we the people". If I am a moron, you are an idiot. Kindly note, morons are smarter than imbeciles, and imbeciles are smarter than idiots.
It's sad to see someone like you quoting Thomas Jefferson. Here is one for you "... no society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a law. The earth belongs always to the living generation." Thomas Jefferson's letter to James Madison, Paris, Sept. 6, 1789.
 

waltky

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Asian drug gangs comin' in through Canadian border...
:eek:
DOJ: ‘Ethnic Asian’ Gangs Dominate Drug Smuggling From Canada, Increasingly Active Inside US
October 3, 2011 – Vietnamese and other ethnic Asian criminal gangs smuggling illicit drugs from Canada into the U.S., dominate the narcotics trade along the northern border, according to the Department of Justice.
The department’s most recent National Drug Threat Assessment says these “transnational criminal organizations” (TCOs) are smuggling mostly MDMA (ecstasy pills) and “high-potency marijuana.” “Canada-based ethnic Asian TCOs are – and should remain – the primary suppliers of MDMA to the United States, producing tens of millions of tablets for the U.S. market,” says the 2011 assessment, released on September 7. “Asian TCOs, principally Canadian-based ethnic Vietnamese criminal organizations, produce MDMA and marijuana in Canada and subsequently smuggle large amounts of the drugs over the Northern Border for distribution in U.S. markets,” it says. The department projects that “MDMA and marijuana smuggling will remain the primary drug threats along the Northern Border.”

The quantities of MDMA seized along the border with Canada have risen significantly in recent years. “The amount of MDMA seized along the Northern Border increased overall from more than 1.9 million tablets in FY2006 to more than 3.9 million tablets in FY2010, the greatest amount seized in the past 5 years,” the DOJ report states. “The number of MDMA seizures per fiscal year along the Northern Border shows a significant increase from FY2006 through FY2010. In addition, the average load size of these seizures continues to increase.”

According to the Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection agency, as of the end September 30, 2010 the U.S. government did not have “effective control” of an estimated 98 percent, or 3,931 miles, of the 4,000-mile northern border (it similarly does not have “effective control” over more than 56 percent of the estimated 2,000-mile long border with Mexico.)

In DHS terminology “effective control” (also known as “operational control”) applies to those areas where the U.S. government can be “reasonably” be expected to intercept illegal cross-border activity. In May, CBP commissioner Alan Bersin told lawmakers that the U.S. government had apprehended more suspected terrorists attempting to enter the country across the northern border than through its southern counterpart.

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waltky

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Mexican narco-war spilling over this side of the border...
:eek:
Texas sheriff: Drug war violence spilling over
Monday, October 31, 2011 — A shooting that injured a sheriff's deputy was the first indisputable case of spillover violence from the Mexican drug wars in Hidalgo County, the local sheriff said Monday.
Sheriff Lupe Trevino, who previously said there was no direct spillover violence in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, said the Sunday shootout erupted while one of his deputies investigated a reported kidnapping and drug deal. "I have to say that with this particular incident, the way the witnesses and the information that we have gotten particularly in the federal system, this is the first recorded spillover violence event that we have experienced — and unfortunately got one of our deputies shot," Trevino said.

One suspect was killed and two were wounded. In all, six people were taken into custody, including the alleged kidnapping victim, and are awaiting charges, the sheriff said. The sheriff said a protective vest probably saved the life of Deputy Hugo Rodriguez, who was shot in the chest, abdomen and leg. He is recovering at a hospital.

Trevino said the reported kidnapping was a bid to recover marijuana stolen when the Gulf cartel's reputed second-in-command, Samuel Flores Borrego, was killed in September. "It started in Mexico, it had a violent confrontation in Mexico, that violent confrontation was spilled over here. This is the very first one that we can actually say, 'Yes, here it is. It has happened,'" Trevino said. "Now, there are more cartel members living in Texas, in the Valley, in the United States. I'll guarantee you there's a ton of them," he said. A message left Monday night for a Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman wasn't immediately returned.

Source
 

waltky

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Why isn't narco-terror also considered terrorism?...
:eusa_eh:
Pervasive insecurity in Mexico: If this isn't 'terror,' what is?
December 3, 2011 - President Calderon called it "terror;" Hilary Clinton called it "insurgency." But still, after 40,000 drug war deaths, the insecurity in Mexico doesn't meet the world standard for "terror."
Across the country bombs packed with unsophisticated explosives have gone off, killing bystanders and targets alike; gory videos documenting the torture and beheadings of countless people are disseminated on the Internet; dismembered bodies are disposed of in public spaces with threatening messages penned as warnings to others. This may sound like a description of Afghanistan, a stronghold for targets of the US "war on terror." But in fact, it's Mexico. And despite the similarities in the tactics of violence and intimidation used, in Afghanistan it's called terrorism; in Mexico it's not.

There's no dispute that the violence – which has claimed more than 40,000 lives since 2007 – is escalating. Yet there is no consensus about what to label the troubling state of affairs. It's variously called a criminal insurgency, narcoterrorism, simply war, and – less frequently – terrorism. Mexicans, in everyday language, call it la inseguridad (insecurity). But does it matter what it's called? Politically and legally it does.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton in 2010 warned that Mexican drug trafficking organizations may be morphing into "what we would consider an insurgency." She was instantly criticized by both Mexicans and Americans, and President Obama stepped in to issue an apology. (An insurgency, in security parlance, is often thought of as a step beyond terrorism, more of a mass movement of violence and crime.)

But Mexican President Felipe CalderĂłn used the "terror" label in response to the casino attack in Monterrey that killed 52 people in August: He tweeted it, his spokesman repeated it, and then in a televised speech, he said it again. It was the first such official use of the term, and there was no domestic political backlash. Going beyond rhetoric, US Rep. Michael McCaul (R) of Texas proposed legislation earlier this year that would label six Mexican drug cartels foreign terrorist organizations (FTOs). "CalderĂłn said it's an attempt to replace the state," says Mr. McCaul, "and he's right." He says the cartels fall under the US federal statute of terrorism.

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See also:


Mexico drug war casualty: Citizenry suffers post-traumatic stress
December 3, 2011 - Outwardly, life seems normal; but as drug war kidnappings, extortion, and violence brush closer to the average citizen, experts say, the mental terrain looks like post-traumatic stress.
It was not a stifling evening, so Carolina Gomez, a pretty and petite kindergarten teacher in this Gulf coast city, turned off her air-conditioning unit and slid open the window over her bed. The tropical breeze lulled her to sleep by 11 p.m. But not three hours later, she was jolted awake by a rumbling, like rocks being dumped on asphalt. As her head cleared, alarm dawned: The air of her neat middle-class neighborhood was thick with automatic weapons fire and explosions. Wishing she could hide under her bed, she lay immobile, partly due to a sprained ankle she was nursing and partly assessing her fears: How close was the shooting? Could bullets stray into her window? Worse, could a fleeing gunman enter her home, her bedroom?

Her cellphone rang: It was her parents in the room next door. "Are you OK? Stay put," they advised. Next, they placed a call to their son, Enrique, who lives on the ground floor of a two-story apartment building next door. "Get in your bathroom," they told him, because there are no windows there. He and his new wife crouched for 40 minutes on the tiled floor as gunfire continued to pierce the air, interrupted finally by the arrival of authorities in helicopters flying so low that Carolina's father, Sergio, says he saw one pilot's face through his window.

Even now, six months later, the bullet-pocked commercial street six blocks from the Gomez home is a testament to the collateral damage of the drug war – the imprint of fear on ordinary lives and what it can do to the civic fabric, from choices as simple as changing shopping habits to changing the nation's presidential politics. A culmination of months of creeping insecurity, the April shootout here was a defining moment for the extended Gomez family: They began arranging an escape – to immigrate to Spain. The family agreed to explore their experience with the Monitor if they could use pseudonyms they felt would assure their safety.

The shootout itself seems almost statistically ordinary in a nation that in 2010 saw 14 mayors assassinated, a surge in kidnappings and extortion acknowledged by the government, and cautionary beheadings become a new standard of criminal threat. Indeed, here in Veracruz it was hardly the first time Carolina had had a brush with violence; and it wouldn't be the last. In the past 22 months, a corpse was left outside her school, family members of her kindergarten students have been kidnapped, and she had to undergo security training in how to survive in the event of a shootout at the school. "But," she explains, "it was the first time I did not feel safe in my bed. I used to go to sleep with confidence. I have become totally convinced that there is not a single safe place in Veracruz."

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Ernie S.

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JMad,
Obviously you work for Haliburton... which moved its headquarters to Dubai to shield itself from the outrage of "we the people". If I am a moron, you are an idiot. Kindly note, morons are smarter than imbeciles, and imbeciles are smarter than idiots.
It's sad to see someone like you quoting Thomas Jefferson. Here is one for you "... no society can make a perpetual constitution, or even a law. The earth belongs always to the living generation." Thomas Jefferson's letter to James Madison, Paris, Sept. 6, 1789.

What's dumber than an idiot, because that's you to a tee. Or are you just an asshole?

You wrote: "Cross the border into Iran? And you get fined by Haliburton - just ask president Chaney!"
#1. Just how can Haliburton fine you for going into Iran? (especially from Dubai)
#2. When was anyone named Chaney President?
 

waltky

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Death toll in Mexico's narco-war...
:eek:
Mexico's drugs war: Lessons and challenges
31 December 2011 - Troops have been deployed in different Mexican states since late 2006
For the past five years, Mexico has been engaged in a bloody confrontation with drug gangs. Mexican political scientist Eduardo Guerrero Gutierrez looks at how the struggle is going and the implications for Mexico's presidential election in July. The past year has been one of light and shade in the fight against organised crime in Mexico. The violence of the drug cartels, against one another as well as against the security forces and innocent citizens, continues to dominate the headlines. Five years after President Felipe Calderon launched his crackdown on the gangs, there have been some 50,000 drug-related killings.

The number of murders in 2011, estimated at around 16,700, is 9% up on the total for 2010. However, a more detailed analysis suggests that the level of violence has stabilised, especially given that from 2009 to 2010 killings jumped by 60%. Indeed, the past year saw an improvement in some of the cities worst hit by organised crime. The main example is Ciudad Juarez where killings in 2011 were down some 40% compared with 2010. Given these figures, it no longer seems justified, if it ever were, to call Juarez the world's most dangerous city.

2011 was marked by the increasing confrontation between two criminal gangs. On the one side is the Pacific Cartel (also known as the Sinaloa cartel) headed by Joaquin Guzman Loera, El Chapo or Shorty. He is one of 11 Mexicans who are on the multimillionaires' list compiled by Forbes business magazine. On the other are Los Zetas, originally the "armed wing" of the Gulf Cartel.

Extortion rackets
 

waltky

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Colombia Drug Lord Wanted By US Gunned Down By Police...
:cool:
Colombian drug lord wanted by U.S. for supplying tonnes of cocaine to Mexican gangs is shot dead by police
2nd January 2012 - Juan de Dios Usuga wanted by U.S. for trafficking; Four top lieutenants captured in early-morning raid; President tweets: 'What a good start to the year'
A Colombian drug lord who flooded the U.S. and Mexico with cocaine was shot dead in his own home on New Year's Eve during a police raid. Juan de Dios Usuga, wanted by the U.S. for supplying tonnes of cocaine to Mexican gangs, was leader of the powerful Urabenos cartel and had a $2.5 million bounty on his head. A team of 150 officers stormed the house, in the northwest area of Choco near the border of Panama, shortly after 6am. They had been tipped off he would be celebrating the start of 2012 there with his brother. Four of his trusted lieutenants were captured and one police officer was killed in the raid.

On hearing the news, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos tweeted: 'The police put down in Choco alias Usuga, head of the Urabenos and captured various of his accomplices. What a good start to the year.' The Urabenos are one of Colombia's main gangs, along with Los Rastrojos, Los Paisas and Las Aguilas Negras. Usuga was a lieutenant of drug lord Daniel Rendon Herrera, who was captured in a 2009 raid. He had formerly been a right-wing paramilitary fighter and was also wanted for his involvement in a series of murders.

Colombia is one of the world's top producers of cocaine, and criminal gangs made up of former right-wing paramilitary groups and old cartels have become a major emerging threat to the nation of 46 million people. In November, Colombia and neighbouring Venezuela announced the capture of one of the region's most-wanted drug traffickers, who was head of the Paisas gang.

While bloodshed from Colombia's long guerrilla and drug wars has dropped since a U.S.-backed offensive began more than a decade ago, bombings, murders and combat continue, mainly in Colombia's frontier areas. The decline in violence has attracted billions of dollars in foreign investment mainly to Colombia's mining and oil sectors, which has allowed the country to boost crude and coal output to historic highs.

Read more: Colombian drug lord wanted by U.S. for supplying tonnes of cocaine to Mexican gangs is shot dead by police | Mail Online

See also:

12,000 Killed In Mexico Drug Violence In 2011
2 Jan.`12 — About 12,000 people were slain last year in Mexico’s surging drug violence, according to grim tallies reported Monday by the country’s leading media outlets. Annual indexes of torture, beheadings and the killing of women all showed increases.
More than 50,000 people have been killed during President Felipe CalderonÂ’s U.S.-backed military confrontation with organized crime and drug trafficking, which began in 2006. The Calderon government, after promising to update figures regularly, has not reported its own death count, perhaps because the trend line does not look good. A government spokesman said new figures would be released later this month. The ruling party is facing national elections this summer, in which the main opposition party threatens to retake the presidency.

The daily newspaper Reforma, one of the nationÂ’s most respected independent news outlets, reported 12,359 drug-related killings in 2011, a 6.3 percent increase compared with the previous year. There were 2,275 drug killings in 2007, Reforma said. Other media reported similar numbers. Daily Milenio recorded 12,284 drug-related deaths last year. La Jornada counted 11,890 deaths in 2011, which it says is an 11 percent decrease from the previous year. Regardless, in its annual tally La Jornada featured a cartoon that showed Father Time 2011 lying in the desert with his head chopped off.

In the Reforma count, the number of bodies that showed signs of torture grew to 1,079. Beheadings reached almost 600, up from 389 the year before. Reforma also found that women increasingly were victims of drug violence, with more than 900 slain last year. The newspaper did not offer a count of juveniles or children killed, but children increasingly have been caught in the crossfire or intentionally targeted to send a chilling message that the drug gangs will stop at nothing.

One of the few bright spots is that the homicide rate appears to be down by about a third in the border manufacturing hub Ciudad Juarez, once dubbed Murder City. Baja California and Tijuana also saw decreases in homicides. Yet the violence has steadily spread across Mexico. The states that abut Texas — Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas — remain the most deadly. But new zones of conflict, such as the once-mellow gulf coast state of Veracruz, are now gripped by a wave of killing.

Source
 

waltky

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Mexican narco-war is a bloodfest...
:eek:
47,515 Drug-War Murders in Mexico in Just 5 Years
January 12, 2012 -- The Mexican government reported that there were 12,903 drug-related homicides in the country during the first nine months of 2011, bringing Mexico's drug-war death toll to 47,515 since Mexican President Felipe CalderĂłn began cracking down on organized crime in December 2006.
That means that between January and September 2011 (273 days), there was an average of 47 drug-related homicides per day in Mexico. According to a Jan. 11 report (in Spanish) on drug-related homicides from MexicoÂ’s Attorney General (ProcuradurĂ­a General de la RepĂşblica, PGR), most of the deaths between January and September 2011 were executions. The 12,903 cartel-related homicides in 2011 (officially called homicides due to rivalry between delinquent organizations) included 10,200 executions; 1,652 deaths from encounters with law enforcement; 740 from direct aggression attacks; and 311 from violence between organized trafficking groups. April was the bloodiest month in 2011 with 1,630 total drug-related deaths, followed by May (1,539) and July (1,519).

The fatalities last year represent an 11 percent increase from those reported by the Mexican government during the same nine-month period in 2010. It is important to note that the recently reported cartel-related homicides only cover the first nine months of 2011. The Mexican government reported a record of 15,273 homicides related to organized crime for the entire year of 2010. Nevertheless, the office of Mexico’s attorney general noted that “2011 is the first year in which the growth of the homicide rate is significantly lower when compared to previous years.” The 11 percent increase in the death rate from 2010 to 2011 is much lower than the 70 percent increase from 2009 to 2010; the 63 percent increase from 2008 to 2009; and the 110 percent increase from 2007 to 2008, according to the Mexican government.

Ciudad Juarez, located directly across from El Paso, Texas, in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, continues to be the deadliest city in Mexico. The Mexican border city where the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels continue to fight for drug trafficking corridors into the United States is considered to be among the most violent cities in the world. Meanwhile, El Paso has been called one of the safest cities north of Mexico. “The homicides remain clearly concentrated in some states of the country,” said Mexico’s attorney general. “70% of deaths, which by nature may have occurred in the context of rivalry between criminal organizations, occurred in eight states in the country.” Those states include Chihuahua (2,276 homicides), Guerrero (1,533), Tamaulipas (1,153), Sinaloa (1,100), Veracruz (538), and Baja California (250).

Meanwhile, there were 1,206 deaths in Juarez alone, making it the most deadly city in 2011. Acapulco, a well-known tourist destination, came as the second deadliest city with 795 deaths, followed by the northern Mexican cities of Torreón (476); Chihuahua, the capital (402); Monterrey (399); Durango (390); Culiacán (365); and y San Fernando (292). The attorney general noted that “beyond the legitimate interest of knowing the phenomenon of crime statistics, the important thing is to ensure that each case is being investigated.” It has been widely reported that most homicides in Mexico are not investigated.

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OP
LilOlLady

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Mexican narco-war is a bloodfest...
:eek:
47,515 Drug-War Murders in Mexico in Just 5 Years
January 12, 2012 -- The Mexican government reported that there were 12,903 drug-related homicides in the country during the first nine months of 2011, bringing Mexico's drug-war death toll to 47,515 since Mexican President Felipe CalderĂłn began cracking down on organized crime in December 2006.
That means that between January and September 2011 (273 days), there was an average of 47 drug-related homicides per day in Mexico. According to a Jan. 11 report (in Spanish) on drug-related homicides from Mexico’s Attorney General (ProcuradurĂ­a General de la RepĂşblica, PGR), most of the deaths between January and September 2011 were executions. The 12,903 cartel-related homicides in 2011 (officially called homicides due to rivalry between delinquent organizations) included 10,200 executions; 1,652 deaths from encounters with law enforcement; 740 from direct aggression attacks; and 311 from violence between organized trafficking groups. April was the bloodiest month in 2011 with 1,630 total drug-related deaths, followed by May (1,539) and July (1,519).

The fatalities last year represent an 11 percent increase from those reported by the Mexican government during the same nine-month period in 2010. It is important to note that the recently reported cartel-related homicides only cover the first nine months of 2011. The Mexican government reported a record of 15,273 homicides related to organized crime for the entire year of 2010. Nevertheless, the office of Mexico’s attorney general noted that “2011 is the first year in which the growth of the homicide rate is significantly lower when compared to previous years.” The 11 percent increase in the death rate from 2010 to 2011 is much lower than the 70 percent increase from 2009 to 2010; the 63 percent increase from 2008 to 2009; and the 110 percent increase from 2007 to 2008, according to the Mexican government.

Ciudad Juarez, located directly across from El Paso, Texas, in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, continues to be the deadliest city in Mexico. The Mexican border city where the Sinaloa and Juarez cartels continue to fight for drug trafficking corridors into the United States is considered to be among the most violent cities in the world. Meanwhile, El Paso has been called one of the safest cities north of Mexico. “The homicides remain clearly concentrated in some states of the country,” said Mexico’s attorney general. “70% of deaths, which by nature may have occurred in the context of rivalry between criminal organizations, occurred in eight states in the country.” Those states include Chihuahua (2,276 homicides), Guerrero (1,533), Tamaulipas (1,153), Sinaloa (1,100), Veracruz (538), and Baja California (250).

Meanwhile, there were 1,206 deaths in Juarez alone, making it the most deadly city in 2011. Acapulco, a well-known tourist destination, came as the second deadliest city with 795 deaths, followed by the northern Mexican cities of TorreĂłn (476); Chihuahua, the capital (402); Monterrey (399); Durango (390); Culiacán (365); and y San Fernando (292). The attorney general noted that “beyond the legitimate interest of knowing the phenomenon of crime statistics, the important thing is to ensure that each case is being investigated.” It has been widely reported that most homicides in Mexico are not investigated.

MORE

Oakland, Ca is more dangerous than Juarez. they come and the bring their violence with them.

Oakland buries 3-year-old killed by gang violence
Oakland buries 3-year-old Carlos Nava killed by gang violence | abc7news.com

Oakland, 2011: An Especially Bloody Year in an Increasingly Violent City

A look at gun incidents paints grim picture, as shootings rose dramatically with scant arrests

Source: The Bay Citizen (http://s.tt/159DC)


Most of the killings in Mexico is between gangs, drugs cartels. Criminals. They do not waste time killing innocent citizens that are no threat to them and their business.
 
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waltky

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Aye, Chihuahua!...
:eek:
One Mexican State Bordering The US Was Deadlier Than All of Afghanistan Last Year
January 18, 2012 – Organized crime-related deaths in one Mexican border state during the first nine months of 2011 exceed the number of Afghan civilians killed in roughly the same period in all of war-torn Afghanistan.
According to the Mexican government, from January through September 2011 2,276 deaths were recorded in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, which borders Texas and New Mexico. A Nov. 2011 Congressional Research Service (CRS) report states that over nearly the same period – January through October 2011 – 2,177 civilians were killed in Afghanistan, where a U.S.-led war against the Taliban is underway. It did not provide a breakdown of responsibility for that period, but said that in 2010, 75 percent of civilian deaths were attributed to the Taliban and other “anti-government elements.”

Per capita, a person was at least nine times more likely to be murdered in Chihuahua last year than in Afghanistan. (Chihuahua has 3,406,465 inhabitants, according to MexicoÂ’s 2010 census; the CIA World Factbook reports that in July 2011 the estimated population of Afghanistan was 29,835,392. According to the reported numbers, the drug-related murder rate was about 67 for every 100,000 inhabitants in Chihuahua last year, while in Afghanistan the civilian killing rate was an estimated seven for every 100,000 people living there.

There were more drug-related killings in Chihuahua than in any other Mexican state, according to the government figures. Chihuahua, the largest state in Mexico, includes Ciudad Juarez, a border city located across from El Paso, Texas. It is the deadliest city in Mexico and is considered one of the most dangerous places in the world. According to the government tally, Juarez accounted for 1,206 (about 53 percent) of the 2,276 drug cartel-related murders in Chihuahua during the fist nine months of 2011.

The state capital, the city of Chihuahua, was also among the five deadliest cities in Mexico over that period, with 402 homicides reported. The organized crime-related deaths in Mexico – officially referred to as homicides due to rivalry between delinquent organizations – include executions, deaths from encounters with authorities, direct aggression attacks, and killings stemming from violence between organized trafficking groups, according to the country’s government.

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waltky

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Not safe for cops to live in Juarez...
:eek:
Mexico border city cops flee homes after 5 slain
February 2, 2012 - Every one of the 2,500 police officers in this Mexican border city has been ordered to leave home and stay in a hotel after the killing of five officers by a local drug cartel.
The gang threatened a week ago to kill one policeman a day unless Police Chief Julian Leyzaola resigns. Juarez Mayor Hector Murguia said Wednesday that the attacks carried out since the warning are a response to toughening police action against drug cartels in the city across from El Paso, Texas. The mayor said there is no way Leyzaola is stepping down. He said most of the officers are "angry because of the attacks," but are deeply committed to fighting crime. Police spokesman Adrian Sanchez said officers were ordered to stay away from their houses after Monday's shootout between assailants and policemen. That assault and previous attacks happened as officers were going to or from home.

The city's government said it has secured 26 million pesos ($2 million) to house officers in hotels but did not specify how long that would last. A policewoman who moved to a hotel in downtown Juarez said Wednesday that officers feel "more like soldiers, living in barracks than police officers." Still, she said, "I don't want my family to become collateral damage if I become a target." The officer, a single mother of two, agreed to discuss the matter only if not quoted by name because she was violating department rules that bar her from talking to journalists. Sanchez said the police department will assess the results of the measure after a month and then decide whether to continue. "So far it's been successful," Murguia said.

At least 10 banners bearing threats to Juarez's police chief appeared around the city last week. The messages were signed by the New Juarez Cartel, an offshoot of the La Linea or Juarez Cartel, a major target of law enforcement actions in recent months. Some of the banners accused Leyzaola, a former Mexican army lieutenant colonel, of favoring a rival cartel, while other messages called for his resignation. "We pay no attention to the banners. If we did, we wouldn't even get out of bed," the mayor said. The five slain officers were killed in three different attacks, bringing the number of officers slain in January to eight.

The latest attack happened Monday, when several officers were ambushed at a gas station. Three assailants were killed and three other policemen were wounded. Murguia said moving the entire police force to hotels was not a setback in the city's fight against crime. Nearly 8,900 people have been killed in drug-related violence in the city since 2008. In 2009, a police chief quit after being threatened. Last year, after hiring Leyzaola, the city saw a decline in reported crimes. More than 1,900 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez last year, compared to more than 3,000 in 2010.

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gallantwarrior

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BORDER WARS AND BEYOND

When 20 million foreigners invade and occupy a country, kill and rape it’s men, women and children, steal and pillage and kill those whose job is to protect this country it is an act and declaration of war and we need to meet force with like force. We need to the U.S. Military, not border patrols, ICE and local law enforcement to “solve” the problem because they are train to do it and they need to go business to business and house to house.

The biggest threat to this country is not the Taliban and Al Qaeda but the hard working illegal aliens who only want a better life for they families who are destroying America and killing more Americans and costing more than 9-11 are the two ongoing wars.

Drug smugglers ARE the hard working illegal aliens who just want a better life for their families. ItÂ’s just that drug smuggling and drug dealing pays more than picking lettuce or flipping hamburgers at McDonalds. How do you think illegal aliens working at McDonalds drives Lexus and Escalades and babies wear designer clothes and have cell phones.

If you are not aware of this, then you have your heads in your asses like our leaders. Is this how illegal aliens contribute to our economy?

Huh? What?
 

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