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Betsy Ross Was An Abolitionist

mudwhistle

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Colin Kapernick probably should have cracked his history books while in school. Maybe he wouldn't be so ignorant. Before he starts a campaign against all things American he should do a little research first. Perhaps he got hit in the head too many times and he's going around in a haze just blurting out whatever comes to mind first.

Here's a few facts Colin overlooked when he decided to protest yet another one of our traditions and institutions:

  • Betsy Ross was a Quaker
  • Quakers were abolitionists
  • Betsy Ross lived in Philadelphia
  • Slavery was illegal in Philadelphia
  • Betsy Ross never owned slaves

300px-RossBetsy.jpg


Betsy Ross (1752-1836) – Ross, a lifelong Philadelphian and a Quaker until eloping with Anglican John Ross in 1773, was 24 and widowed, an upholsterer on Arch Street when Declaration of Independence signers George Washington, George Ross, Jr. (the uncle of her late husband) and Robert Morris asked her to stitch a flag. But her life is more than that single flag. Not only did Ross’ upholstery clients include Washington and Benjamin Franklin, she also stitched hundreds of flags for the United States government, including flags that flew in the War of 1812 and flags sent as gifts on official diplomatic relations with Native Americans. At home, she lost two husbands to the Revolutionary War and cared for a third in his late life illness, reared five daughters, brought many orphaned nieces into her home and survived the yellow fever epidemic that took the lives of both her parents and a sister, living until age 84.​


Quakers in the abolition movement
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) played a major role in the abolition movement against slavery in both the United Kingdom and in the United States of America. Quakers were among the first white people to denounce slavery in the American colonies and Europe, and the Society of Friends became the first organization to take a collective stand against both slavery and the slave trade, later spearheading the international and ecumenical campaigns against slavery.

Beginnings
Quaker colonists began questioning slavery in Barbados in the 1670s, but first openly denounced it in 1688. In that year, four German settlers (the Lutheran Francis Daniel Pastorius and three Quakers) issued a protest from Germantown, close to Philadelphia in the newly founded American colony of Pennsylvania. This action, although seemingly overlooked at the time, ushered in almost a century of active debate among Pennsylvanian Quakers about the morality of slavery which saw energetic anti-slavery writing and direct action from several Quakers, including William Southeby, John Hepburn, Ralph Sandiford, and Benjamin Lay.

268px-BetsyRossBicentennial-1952.jpg


During the 1740s and 50s, anti-slavery sentiment took a firmer hold. A new generation of Quakers, including John Woolman, Anthony Benezet and David Cooper, protested against slavery, and demanded that Quaker society cut ties with the slave trade. They were able to carry popular Quaker sentiment with them and, beginning in the 1750s, Pennsylvanian Quakers tightened their rules, by 1758 making it effectively an act of misconduct to engage in slave trading. The London Yearly Meeting soon followed, issuing a ‘strong minute’ against slave trading in 1761. On paper at least, global politics would intervene. The American Revolution would divide Quakers across the Atlantic.

Links

Quakers in the abolition movement - Wikipedia
Betsy Ross - Wikipedia
The Truth About Betsy Ross
 
Last edited:

JoeMoma

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I understand that sales of the BR Flag are booming. Might even buy one myself.
 

gallantwarrior

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It's a real shame that a (formerly) successful company panders to the lowest denominator. It would certainly be entertaining if conservative consumers employed the same tactics used by libs and started boycotting Nike and its stupid agenda sucking up to lowlife scum like Kaepernick.
 

Deplorable Yankee

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Their was a company called mastex in R.I.
I knew the owners ...They were old guys when i first started ...the one brother died last decade ....the other brother hated my guts
They we're the largest shower curtain and flag makers in the country for decades
Anyone with half a brain is working out getting out a million betsy ross flags on anything and everything right now

Although the first two weeks of july was always the traditional Vacation time for my industry
 

percysunshine

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Colin Kapernick probably should have cracked his history books while in school. Maybe he wouldn't be so ignorant. Before he starts a campaign against all things American he should do a little research first. Perhaps he got hit in the head too many times and he's going around in a haze just blurting out whatever comes to mind first.

Here's a few facts Colin overlooked when he decided to protest yet another one of our traditions and institutions:

  • Betsy Ross was a Quaker
  • Quakers were abolitionists
  • Betsy Ross lived in Philadelphia
  • Slavery was illegal in Philadelphia
  • Betsy Ross never owned slaves

300px-RossBetsy.jpg


Betsy Ross (1752-1836) – Ross, a lifelong Philadelphian and a Quaker until eloping with Anglican John Ross in 1773, was 24 and widowed, an upholsterer on Arch Street when Declaration of Independence signers George Washington, George Ross, Jr. (the uncle of her late husband) and Robert Morris asked her to stitch a flag. But her life is more than that single flag. Not only did Ross’ upholstery clients include Washington and Benjamin Franklin, she also stitched hundreds of flags for the United States government, including flags that flew in the War of 1812 and flags sent as gifts on official diplomatic relations with Native Americans. At home, she lost two husbands to the Revolutionary War and cared for a third in his late life illness, reared five daughters, brought many orphaned nieces into her home and survived the yellow fever epidemic that took the lives of both her parents and a sister, living until age 84.​


Quakers in the abolition movement
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) played a major role in the abolition movement against slavery in both the United Kingdom and in the United States of America. Quakers were among the first white people to denounce slavery in the American colonies and Europe, and the Society of Friends became the first organization to take a collective stand against both slavery and the slave trade, later spearheading the international and ecumenical campaigns against slavery.

Beginnings
Quaker colonists began questioning slavery in Barbados in the 1670s, but first openly denounced it in 1688. In that year, four German settlers (the Lutheran Francis Daniel Pastorius and three Quakers) issued a protest from Germantown, close to Philadelphia in the newly founded American colony of Pennsylvania. This action, although seemingly overlooked at the time, ushered in almost a century of active debate among Pennsylvanian Quakers about the morality of slavery which saw energetic anti-slavery writing and direct action from several Quakers, including William Southeby, John Hepburn, Ralph Sandiford, and Benjamin Lay.

268px-BetsyRossBicentennial-1952.jpg


During the 1740s and 50s, anti-slavery sentiment took a firmer hold. A new generation of Quakers, including John Woolman, Anthony Benezet and David Cooper, protested against slavery, and demanded that Quaker society cut ties with the slave trade. They were able to carry popular Quaker sentiment with them and, beginning in the 1750s, Pennsylvanian Quakers tightened their rules, by 1758 making it effectively an act of misconduct to engage in slave trading. The London Yearly Meeting soon followed, issuing a ‘strong minute’ against slave trading in 1761. On paper at least, global politics would intervene. The American Revolution would divide Quakers across the Atlantic.

Links

Quakers in the abolition movement - Wikipedia
Betsy Ross - Wikipedia
The Truth About Betsy Ross

Facts are so confusing...please stop...
 

BasicHumanUnit

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So, exactly how divided can we as a people become....and still be "The United States of America" ?

Looks to me like we're already totally divided.

Maybe we should change the name?

The Disjointed States of America ?
The Hostile States of America ?
The Unfriendly States of America ?
The Broken States of America ?

Long story short, we cannot remain the United States as long as leftists have equal say. They hate America and long and work for it's demise.
 

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