38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand

longknife

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
 

JGalt

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

 

fncceo

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.
 

JGalt

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
 

fncceo

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
There are over 160 different British accents ... none of them are perfect.
 

JGalt

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
There are over 160 different British accents ... none of them are perfect.

How do they understand each other? When I lived in Texas, I was a block mason and had Mexican laborers. Being from different Mexican states, sometimes they had trouble understanding each other.
 

fncceo

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
There are over 160 different British accents ... none of them are perfect.

How do they understand each other? When I lived in Texas, I was a block mason and had Mexican laborers. Being from different Mexican states, sometimes they had trouble understanding each other.
 

Dick Foster

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Is it all Brits or just the snotty author?


And, who cares?


So, it’s not “proper” grammar but who the heck is the Almighty Decider of what the English language is supposed to be?


Some modern American imports Matthew can’t stand— among them “faze” (as in “it doesn’t faze me”), “hospitalize,” “elevator,” “rookies” (for “newcomers”), and “guy,” “less and less the centerpiece of the ancient British festival of 5 November [Guy Fawkes Day]—or, as it will soon be known, 11/5. Now someone of either gender.” However, sometimes, he concedes, American phrases can have “vigor and vivacity”: “A relative of mine told me recently he went to a business meeting chaired by a California woman who wanted everyone to speak frankly. It was ‘open kimono.’”


I’m not about to post the list; you can check it out yourselves
@ 38 Americanisms the British Can’t Bloody Stand
Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
There are over 160 different British accents ... none of them are perfect.

How do they understand each other? When I lived in Texas, I was a block mason and had Mexican laborers. Being from different Mexican states, sometimes they had trouble understanding each other.
Thats nothing there are so many dialects of Chinese many can't converse yet they have only one written language, Mandarin so they can pass notes. Go figure.
 

JGalt

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Call me weird, but a British accent drives me up the wall like nails on a chalkboard. And It always cracks me up severely whenever I see a guy like this on the BBC News, and he talks like this...

"Oy matey! Me pudagig be froggydoo 'wit me bubble an' squeak. Rightyo pip pip an' all that rot, me blaggard."

That man is an Australian Aboriginal.

Probably so, the pic was just used as an example. But every time I see some blatantly non-European speak in a perfect British accent, it really cracks me the hell up.

:laughing0301:
There are over 160 different British accents ... none of them are perfect.

How do they understand each other? When I lived in Texas, I was a block mason and had Mexican laborers. Being from different Mexican states, sometimes they had trouble understanding each other.
That's the funniest thing I've seen all week. :laugh::lmao::lol: :laughing0301:
 

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