Women, The Vote, and the GOP

Discussion in 'History' started by PoliticalChic, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    1. "On Aug. 26, 1920 — 92 years ago today — women's right to vote became law after Tennessee's pivotal ratification of the 19th Amendment. Although it is not well known, Aug. 26 of each year since 1971 has been proclaimed a day of commemoration by U.S. presidents to celebrate the anniversary of women winning the right to vote and to serve as a "symbol of the continued fight for equal rights."
    Patricia Pierce: Women must exercise their right to vote to gain true equality » Knoxville News Sentinel



    2. It was a Republican who introduced what became the 19th Amendment, women’s suffrage. On May 21, 1919, U.S. Representative James R. Mann (1856-1922), a Republican from Illinois and chairman of the Suffrage Committee, proposed the House resolution to approve the Susan Anthony Amendment granting women the right to vote. The measure passed the House 304-89—a full 42 votes above the required two-thirds majority. 19th Amendment — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts

    3. The 1919 vote in the House of Representatives was possible because Republicans had retaken control of the House. Attempts to get it passed through Democrat-controlled Congresses had failed.

    4. The Senate vote was approved only after a Democrat filibuster; and 82% of the Republican Senators voted for it….and 54% of the Democrats.




    5. 26 of the 36 states that ratified the 19th Amendment had Republican legislatures.

    6. Two weeks later, on June 4, 1919, the Senate passed the 19th Amendment by two votes over its two-thirds required majority, 56-25. The amendment was then sent to the states for ratification. Within six days of the ratification cycle, Illinois, Michigan and Wisconsin each ratified the amendment. Kansas, New York and Ohio followed on June 16, 1919. By March of the following year, a total of 35 states had approved the amendment, one state shy of the two-thirds required for ratification. Southern states were adamantly opposed to the amendment, however, and seven of them—Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, South Carolina and Virginia—had already rejected it before Tennessee's vote on August 18, 1920. It was up to Tennessee to tip the scale for woman suffrage. Op. Cit.


    7. The outlook appeared bleak, given the outcomes in other Southern states and given the position of Tennessee's state legislators in their 48-48 tie. The state's decision came down to 23-year-old Representative Harry T. Burn (1895-1977), a Republican from McMinn County, to cast the deciding vote. Although Burn opposed the amendment, his mother convinced him to approve it. (Mrs. Burn reportedly wrote to her son: "Don't forget to be a good boy and help Mrs. Catt put the 'rat' in ratification.") With Burn's vote, the 19th Amendment was ratified. Certification by U.S. Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby (1869-1950) followed on August 26, 1920. Op. Cit.



    8. The National Women's Party led by Alice Paul became the first "cause" to picket outside the White House. Paul and Lucy Burns led a series of protests against the Wilson Administration in Washington. Wilson ignored the protests for six months, but on June 20, 1917, as a Russian delegation drove up to the White House, suffragettes unfurled a banner which stated; "We women of America tell you that America is not a democracy. Twenty million women are denied the right to vote. President Wilson is the chief opponent of their national enfranchisement".[24] Another banner on August 14, 1917, referred to "Kaiser Wilson" and compared the plight of the German people with that of American women. With this manner of protest, the women were subject to arrests and many were jailed.[25] On October 17, Alice Paul was sentenced to seven months and on October 30 began a hunger strike, but after a few days prison authorities began to force feed her.[24] After years of opposition, Wilson changed his position in 1918 to advocate women's suffrage as a war measure.[26] Women's suffrage in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    a. During the 1912 presidential campaign against Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson and his opponent agreed on many reform measures such as child-labor laws and pro-union legislation. They differed, however, on the subject of women's suffrage, as Roosevelt was in favor of giving women the vote.
    President Woodrow Wilson picketed by women suffragists — History.com This Day in History — 8/28/1917



    So....thank you, Republicans....a great big hug from all of the women who have studied the history of this great nation!


    Here's hoping that the obfuscaters of the Left cannot go on hiding and rewriting our past.


    We know who really has a 'war on women.'
     
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
  2. Moonglow
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    Moonglow Diamond Member

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    Well if the founding fathers were that great they would have let women vote from the get go.
     
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  3. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    I am glad you support Patricia Pierce, who is a national delegate to Vision 2020.

    Vision 2020 proudly welcomes AAUW as a National Ally.


    President Barack Obama’s First 100 Days:
    A Progress Report on AAUW Priority Issues


    On April 29, President Barack Obama reached 100 days in office. Since Franklin Roosevelt’s time, a presidential administration’s first 100 days has been seen as an important barometer for a new administration. Successes and missteps are carefully cataloged and analyzed, and for this president the stakes are especially high. President Obama’s historic inauguration in January was a moment of great optimism and hope for America, but for any new administration the work begins long before the pomp and circumstance of Inauguration Day. Nominees are vetted, agendas are developed, and timelines are made. The same is true for advocacy organizations like AAUW. For months before the oath of office was administered, AAUW was engaged in an intensive effort to lay out our priorities and establish goals on a variety of issues for the new administration’s first 100 days. We consulted with the Obama transition team on many occasions and sent them prioritized position papers as well. AAUW also collaborated with coalition partners on issues of mutual concern and mobilized activists to ensure that our voices were heard. In short, we were prepared for the start of the new administration.

    AAUW is pleased to report that over the first 100 days, we have enjoyed several policy successes. The first piece of legislation President Obama signed was the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act (S.181), a critical victory in the fight for pay equity that reversed the Supreme Court’s disastrous 2007 Ledbetter decision.1 AAUW was a leading voice in the effort to get the bill signed and had a front row seat—literally—when President Obama signed it into law. AAUW was further pleased that many of our top funding priorities were included in the economic recovery package known as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: tax credits for working families, extended unemployment insurance for those out of work, and increased assistance to help students pay for college.2

    In addition, President Obama signed into law an omnibus appropriations act that, among other things, increased funding for Pell grants, job training programs to retrain workers, and family planning programs.3 The Obama administration also released its FY2010 budget blueprint, which proposes various initiatives that will further decrease the cost of attending college, increase the availability of quality and affordable health care, and provide more assistance to working women and their families through job training and early child care funding.4 In March 2009, in honor of Women’s History Month, President Obama created the White House Council on Women and Girls, which will promote interagency collaboration and a coordinated federal response in addressing critical issues facing women and their families, as well as undertake further policy initiatives to advance gender equity.

    This report is derived from and in keeping with policy positions laid out in AAUW’s Federal Policy Agenda and member-adopted Public Policy Program. AAUW fully understands and appreciates that no administration accomplishes all of its goals or meets all expectations in 100 days. We also recognize that certain priorities of the Obama administration must take precedence over others during this time of severe economic decline. However, AAUW believes just as strongly that issues of equity cannot be pushed aside; indeed, the more progress we make on achieving equity, the stronger and more prosperous our nation will become.

    The Obama administration had some important achievements and built critical infrastructure during its jam-packed first 100 days, but of course much more remains to be done. AAUW is pleased to offer the following progress report of the administration’s first 100 days. In so doing, we provide our assessment of the administration’s progress, identify areas where more work can be done, and look forward to achieving more victories in the months and years ahead.

    more
     
  4. PoliticalChic
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    PoliticalChic Diamond Member

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    No remark could identify one as ignorant of history at that one.

    Nor, as a better, more clear-cut example of what Shelby Steele was getting at here:

    "At home the values that made us exceptional have been smeared with derision. Individual initiative and individual responsibility—the very engines of our exceptionalism—now carry a stigma of hypocrisy. For centuries America made sure that no amount of initiative would lift minorities and women. So in liberal quarters today—where historical shames are made to define the present—..."
    Shelby Steele: Obama and the Burden of Exceptionalism - WSJ.com


    n liberal quarters today—where historical shames are made to define the present—..."
     
  5. PredFan
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    PredFan Gold Member

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    How any self-respecting woman would vote democrat is beyond me.
     
  6. Moonglow
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    Moonglow Diamond Member

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    Just like you and the writer, trying to shame liberals by using an example of the historical shames by "progressives, liberals, democrats" of the past, to define the present.
    Works both ways. Really not that hard to see the irony and hypocrisy of the writer.
    Instead of presenting and idea or statemnt that is neutral, you always try to post historical shames, a tired inception of bad debating, but let us not forget about that vindictive nature.
     
  7. Moonglow
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    Moonglow Diamond Member

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    The ones that do not want to follow behind their men
     
  8. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    Yea, women need to know their place as second class citizens. Today's GOP is working very hard to protect that status.

    Senate Republicans Vote Unanimously Against Bill To Help Guarantee Fair Pay For Women


    Nov 17, 2010

    Today, Senate Republicans voted unanimously against legislation to close the pay gap between women and men. The Senate voted 58-41 against allowing debate on the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would help end discriminatory pay practices against women. It had already passed the House.

    More than 45 years after passage of the Equal Pay Act, the pay gap shockingly persists with women still earning on average 77 cents to every man’s dollar. According to the National Women’s Law Center, “This persistent pay gap translates to more than $10,000 in lost wages per year for the average female worker.” The gap is even worse for women of color: African-American women earn 61 cents and Latinas earn 52 cents for every dollar a white non-Hispanic man earns.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    National Committee on Pay Equity

    Current legislation

    The National Committee on Pay Equity supports two bills in Congress aimed at curbing wage discrimination. The bills work on different aspects of wage discrimination, and both are needed to fully close the wage gap.

    The Fair Pay Act (S.788, H.R.1493) is sponsored by Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC). It seeks to end wage discrimination against those who work in female-dominated or minority-dominated jobs by establishing equal pay for equivalent work. For example, within individual companies, employers could not pay jobs that are held predominately by women less than jobs held predominately by men if those jobs are equivalent in value to the employer. The bill also protects workers on the basis of race or national origin. The Fair Pay Act makes exceptions for different wage rates based on seniority, merit, or quantity or quality of work. It also contains a small business exemption.

    The Paycheck Fairness Act
    (S.797, H.R.1519), sponsored by Senator Barbara Milkuski (D-MD) and Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), strengthens and updates the Equal Pay Act of 1963. The bill expands damages under the Equal Pay Act and amends its very broad fourth affirmative defense. In addition, the Paycheck Fairness Act calls for a study of data collected by the EEOC and proposes voluntary guidelines to show employers how to evaluate jobs with the goal of eliminating unfair disparities. The bill was passed by the House of Representatives on January 9, 2009. It was defeated in the Senate on a 58-41 procedural vote on Nov. 17, 2010 and again on June 5, 2012 on another 52-47 procedural vote that was strictly along party lines
     
  9. PredFan
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    PredFan Gold Member

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    I see that reading comprehension isn't one of your strong points. How you got "Women need to know their place" from my statement is unfathomable.
     
  10. Bfgrn
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    Bfgrn Gold Member

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    I didn't get it from your statement. I see that literary techniques like sarcasm and irony are beyond your cognitive level. As I suspected...smile...
     

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