Why Does the U.S. Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Mindful, Dec 9, 2019.

  1. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    The Fahrenheit scale was devised by German scientist Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit in 1724 and, in 1742, a Swedish astronomer named Andres Celsius came up with a less unwieldy system based on multiples of 10, which is the system used today in most of the world. PIXABAY

    Why Does the U.S. Use Fahrenheit Instead of Celsius?
     
  2. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    Because Fahrenheit is easier to spell.
     
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  3. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    ^If you're an American and you've ever had a conversation with someone from another country about the weather, you've probably been a little confused when he or she says that the afternoon temperature is a nice 21 degrees. To you, that might sound like a chilly winter day, but to them, it's a pleasantly warm springtime temperature.

    That's because virtually every other country in the rest of the world uses the Celsius temperature scale, part of the metric system, which denotes the temperature at which water freezes as 0 degrees, and the temperature at which it boils as 100 degrees. But the U.S. and a few other holdouts – the Cayman Islands, the Bahamas, Belize and Palau – cling to the Fahrenheit scale, in which water freezes at 32 degrees and boils at 212 degrees. That means that the 21 degrees C temperature that we previously mentioned is the equivalent of a balmy 70 degrees F in the U.S.

    The persistence of Fahrenheit is one of those puzzling American idiosyncrasies, the equivalent of how the U.S. uses the word soccer to describe what the rest of the planet calls football. So why is it that the U.S. uses a different temperature scale, and why doesn't it switch to be consistent with the rest of the world? There doesn't seem to be a logical answer, except perhaps inertia. Americans generally loathe the metric system – this 2015 poll found that just 21 percent of the public favored converting to metric measures, while 64 percent were opposed.
     
  4. Mindful
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    :disbelief::twirl:
     
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    The Celsius scale is too large as each is equivalent to 1.8 degrees Farenheit.

    Liters are too small, as are kilometers and kilograms. Think about filling up your car and it taking 80 liters. Distances work better than kilometers. Everyone would love to weigh 75 kilos but the range is too wide. .

    Liquid measure are
     
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  6. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    Nothing wrong with inertia. No reason to change for change's sake. Jimmy Carter tried to legislate the metric system into America in the '70s and it flopped miserably.

    [​IMG]
     
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  7. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    Yes; but just think. It was invented by a German.
     
  8. Mindful
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    Mindful Platinum Member

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    OTOH, you do have metric. I've noticed in Target, for instance, the bedding is also listed in metres and centimetres.

    And in French!
     
  9. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    That must be why it's illegal to tear off the tags.
     
  10. fncceo
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    fncceo Gold Member

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    Not everything that came out of Germany is bad ...

    [​IMG]
     

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